STAT

Squashed in space: Study identifies changes in astronauts’ brains

Without gravity to pull the brain toward astronauts' feet, it shifts toward the top of the skull during prolonged space missions.

Sure, space travel makes bones and muscles atrophy and alters the distribution of blood and other bodily fluids, among other physiological consequences of microgravity, but what does it do to the brain? Since astronauts on a mission to Mars will need their wits about them, NASA and outside scientists have been keen to assess the effects of prolonged weightlessness on the 3 pounds of protoplasm inside the skull.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from STAT

STAT4 min readWellness
New Evidence Points To Possible Cause Of Puzzling Paralysis In Kids
Researchers say they have strong new evidence that a virus is involved in a rare and puzzling polio-like condition affecting U.S. children.
STAT3 min readSociety
Health Officials Ramp Up Ebola Response After First Cases Reported In Uganda
The 5-year-old boy who was infected with Ebola and crossed into Uganda earlier this week has died, the country’s health ministry said Wednesday.
STAT1 min read
Listen: Biohacking Meets Bureaucracy, And The Latest Twist In CRISPR World
Is biohacking a crime? And who came up with the latest #CRISPR trick? Find out on the latest episode of our #biotech #podcast, "The Readout LOUD." Listen now: