TIME

THE ART OF DYING

The father of mindfulness returns home to transition to the next life
Thich Nhat Hanh, shown in an undated photo at his Plum Village monastery in France, introduced ways to meditate that anyone could master

AT A BUDDHIST TEMPLE OUTSIDE HUE, VIETNAM’S onetime capital, 92-year-old Thich Nhat Hanh has come to quietly “transition,” as his disciples put it. The ailing celebrity monk—quoted by Presidents and hailed by Oprah Winfrey as “one of the most influential spiritual leaders of our times”—is refusing medication prescribed after a stroke in 2014. He lies in a villa in the grounds of the 19th century Tu Hieu Pagoda, awaiting liberation from the cyclical nature of existence.

At the gate, devotees take photos. Some have flown from Europe for a glimpse of Thay, as they call him, using the Vietnamese word for teacher. Since arriving on Oct. 28, he has made several appearances in a wheelchair, greeted by hundreds of pilgrims, though the rains and his frailty have mostly put a stop to these. On a wet afternoon in December, the blinds were drawn back so TIME could observe the monk being paid a visit by a couple of U.S. diplomats. The Zen master, unable to speak, looked as though he could breathe his last at any moment. His room is devoid of all but basic furnishings. Born Nguyen Xuan Bao,

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

Related Interests

More from TIME

TIME4 min readPolitics
‘Willful Ignorance.’ Inside President Trump’s Troubled Intelligence Briefings
FOR MORE THAN TWO YEARS, THE ELITE CORE OF intelligence professionals stayed silent. But faced with President Donald Trump’s renewed attacks on America’s top spymasters and mounting security challenges around the globe, senior intelligence briefers r
TIME5 min read
Small Countries Lead Big On Climate Change
THE MOST VALUABLE RESOURCE AT THE WORLD ECONOMIC Forum at Davos is time. No one has enough of it, so everyone makes compromises to make the most of it. President Carlos Alvarado Quesada of Costa Rica is no exception. As we near the 10-minute point of
TIME1 min read
A History-making Legislative Session
NEVADA’S NEW LEGISLATIVE SESSION ON FEB. 4 signaled more than the start of government as usual. It carried the weight of history. The session marked the first time in U.S. history that women have made up a majority of any state’s legislature. The oc