TIME

David Treuer

The Ojibwe writer on Elizabeth Warren, the problem with tragedy, and his new book, The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee

You describe your book as a “counternarrative” to the 1970 history Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. What was your reaction the first time you read it? It was in every Indian household, but I didn’t read it until college. I remember feeling both applauded and eradicated. It tries to draw attention to a legacy of injustice, but on the other hand it

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