The Atlantic

Using D-Day to Remind Trump Who His Real Allies Are

Trump has expressed affection for authoritarian leaders, so it’s unclear what impression the celebrations will make on the president.
Source: Chris Jackson / Pool / Reuters

PORTSMOUTH, England—Strongmen, autocrats, and illiberal adversaries of the United States have long had a place in President Donald Trump’s affections. Democratically elected allies: not so much.

Hosting Trump for a state visit that ended Wednesday, Britain used every bit of pageantry and symbolism in its arsenal to impress upon the “America First” president that it’s important to distinguish friend from foe.

Here in the English harbor town of Portsmouth, a jumping-off point for the D-Day landings that will have taken place 75 years ago on Thursday, Trump watched wartime reenactments and a retelling of the Allied invasion that would repel Hitler’s forces and free Europe from Nazi control.

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