The Atlantic

Hong Kong’s Protesters Earn a Victory. They Will Need More.

Officials in Hong Kong said they would suspend controversial proposed legislation. There will be other efforts to erode the city’s freedoms.
Source: Athit Perawongmetha / Reuters

HONG KONG—Call it a victory for Hong Kong’s protesters. But the battle is far from over.

Hours after reportedly having met with a senior Chinese official, a stern-faced Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s Beijing-friendly chief executive, announced that her government would temporarily suspend plans to push through a law that would allow suspected criminals to be extradited to mainland China.

Her speech capped a remarkable week here. Last weekend, hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets to protest the bill, one of the biggest demonstrations the city has ever seen. Indeed, the broad unpopularity of the proposed extradition law is difficult to overstate: It has united students, lawyers, pro-democracy legislators, corporate executives,

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic5 min read
The Fraught Effort To Return To The Moon
NASA wants to put people back on the lunar surface in 2024, but it doesn’t have the budget.
The Atlantic8 min readPolitics
The Nationalists Take Washington
Prominent figures from Tucker Carlson to John Bolton gathered at the Ritz-Carlton to declare war on the conservative establishment and lay the groundwork for a new intellectual movement on the right.
The Atlantic4 min read
Can A Film Be A Love Letter To A Country?
New movies from the writer-directors Lulu Wang and Diana Peralta explore complex questions about national belonging and communal responsibility.