• audiobook

From the Publisher

Why do we get so embarrassed when a colleague wears the same shirt? Why do we eat the same thing for breakfast every day, but seek out novelty at lunch and dinner? How has streaming changed the way Netflix makes recommendations? Why do people think the music of their youth is the best? How can you spot a fake review on Yelp?

Our preferences and opinions are constantly being shaped by countless forces - especially in the digital age with its nonstop procession of "thumbs up" and "likes" and "stars." Tom Vanderbilt, bestselling author of Traffic, explains why we like the things we like, why we hate the things we hate, and what all this tell us about ourselves.
 
With a voracious curiosity, Vanderbilt stalks the elusive beast of taste, probing research in psychology, marketing, and neuroscience to answer myriad complex and fascinating questions. If you've ever wondered how Netflix recommends movies or why books often see a sudden decline in Amazon ratings after they win a major prize, Tom Vanderbilt has answers to these questions and many more that you've probably never thought to ask.


From the Hardcover edition.
Published: Random House Audio on
ISBN: 0399567674
Unabridged
Listen on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for You May Also Like: Taste in an Age of Endless Choice
With a 30 day free trial you can listen to one free audiobook per month

    Related Articles

    Nautilus
    1 min read
    Science

    Spark of Science: Robbert Dijkgraaf: The director of the Institute for Advanced Study on the wonders of his childhood attic.

    Robbert Dijkgraaf will sometimes let himself drift back to his childhood attic in the Netherlands. It was there that he did some of his first physics experiments, playing with discarded binocular optics that his father kept stacked in boxes. As he has risen to take the leadership of the Institute for Advanced Study, one of the world’s most prestigious academic institutions, those early experiences have not lost their power. “It’s very important to go back to the origin of your passion,” he says. They have also helped to shape his ideas about science education. Like many educators we talk to, D
    Nautilus
    1 min read
    Science

    Graphing Human Uniqueness

    Throughout this issue, we’ve explored the question of whether humans are unique, and if so, in what ways. In one interactive piece, “The Vocabulary of Our Uniqueness,” we asked readers which words best described what makes us special. And here are the results. Readers cast 1,234 votes for 56 different terms, which we have grouped together thematically (and subjectively). This is obviously not a rigorously precise survey, but it’s enough to give a general snapshot of how people think of the question. The number one choice turned out to be “science,” which also included the terms “math” and “ast
    NPR
    2 min read
    Science

    PHOTOS: Scientists Take To Washington To Stress A Nonpartisan Agenda

    Attendees from across the country descended on the nation's capital to speak up for science. The March for Science unfolded on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, and in multiple cities around the world. Coinciding with Earth Day, the event drew researchers, educators and scientifically-minded people. The event kicked off with open teaching sessions on the Mall, followed by a rally near the Washington Monument, and then a march that traveled to the U.S. Capitol building. NPR spoke to some of the participants about why they decided to attend the March for Science. Brad Slocum, a