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From the Publisher

Get your brain fit--and your body will follow!

Conventional wisdom has always been that in order to lose weight, you need to eat less and move more. But skyrocketing obesity rates tell us that it's not that simple. If you really want to get in shape and stay that way, you need to start at the top--with your brain.

The latest research in neuroscience shows that the brains of overweight people are different than the brains of lean people--and not in a good way. Yet, you can train your brain to think like those skinnier counterparts--and leverage that brainpower to drop those extra pounds for good. In Train Your Brain to Get Thin, you'll learn how to:
Control hunger levels to reach and maintain optimum weight Defeat emotional eating at its core Feed the brain the nutrients it needs for optimal performance Trick the brain into working for, not against, weight loss Get "addicted" to exercise, not food And much, much more!
Train Your Brain to Get Thin combines the latest research in both neuroscience and human behavior to give you the brain-changing program you need to get fit, look good, and feel great--for life!
Published: Simon & Schuster on
ISBN: 9781440543623
List price: $12.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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