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Chris Ogston

Education 338
Unit Plan: Hatchet

Context of the Unit:


This unit is designed for 6th grade students. This class is very reading and literature centered.
These students are all white and the school is in a rural setting. Many of the students also live in
rural, country settings. All of the students show that they care about learning and have a great
capacity to do so. These students are included in the oldest third of all students in the school, so
they have a maturity level that is high, relative to their peers in the school. All of the students
have basic knowledge of computers and electronics and they feel comfortable using these
devices for educational purposes. The reading level of all of the students is also very proficient.
Most of the students are at a reading level that is at or above their actual grade. The time
schedule for the class goes from 9:18 am-10:10, with 52 total minute

Standards that this unit will address:


Michigans Grade Level Content Expectations for 6th Grade English Language Arts
Strand 1: Reading
R.WS.06.01 explain and use word structure, sentence structure, and prediction to aid in decoding
and understanding the meanings of words encountered in context.
R.WS.06.03 automatically recognize frequently encountered words in print with the number of
words that can be read fluently increasing steadily across the school year.
R.NT.06.02 analyze the structure, elements, style, and purpose of narrative genre including
folktales, fantasy, adventure, and action stories
R.NT.06.04 analyze how authors use literary devices including dialogue, imagery, mood, and
understatement to develop the plot, characters, point of view, and theme.
R.MT.06.01 self-monitor comprehension when reading or listening to text by automatically
applying and discussing the strategies used by mature readers to increase comprehension
including: predicting, constructing mental images, visually representing ideas in text,
questioning, rereading or listening again if uncertain about meaning, inferring, summarizing, and
engaging in interpretive discussions.
R.AT.06.01 be enthusiastic about reading and do substantial reading and writing on their own.
Strand 2: Writing
W.GN.06.01 write a cohesive narrative piece such as a personal narrative, adventure, tall tale,
folktale, fantasy, or poetry that includes appropriate conventions to the genre, employing

elements of characterization for major and minor characters; internal and/or external conflict;
and issues of plot, theme, and imagery
W.PR.06.01 set a purpose, consider audience, and replicate authors styles and patterns when
writing a narrative or informational piece.
W.PR.06.02 apply a variety of pre-writing strategies for both narrative (e.g., graphic organizers
designed to develop a plot that includes major and minor characters, builds climax, and uses
dialogue to enhance a theme) and informational writing (e.g., problem/solution or sequence).
W.PR.06.04 draft focused ideas for a specific purpose using multiple paragraphs, sentence
variety, and voice to meet the needs of an audience (e.g., word choice, level of formality, and use
of example) when writing compositions.
W.PR.06.05 proofread and edit writing using grade-level checklists and other appropriate
resources both individually and in groups.
W.GR.06.01 in the context of writing, correctly use style conventions (e.g., Modern Language
Association Handbook) and a variety of grammatical structures in writing including indefinite
and predicate pronouns; transitive and intransitive verbs; adjective and adverbial phrases;
adjective and adverbial subordinate clauses; comparative adverbs and adjectives; superlatives,
conjunctions; compound sentences; appositives; independent and dependent clauses;
introductory phrases; periods; commas; quotation marks; and use of underlining and italics for
specific purposes.
W.SP.06.01 in the context of writing, correctly spell frequently encountered and frequently
misspelled words.
W.HW.06.01 write neat and legible compositions.
Strand 3: Speaking
S.CN.06.03 present in standard American English if it is their first language. (Students whose
first language is not English will present in their developing version of standard American
English.
S.DS.06.03 discuss written narratives that include a variety of literary and plot devices (e.g.,
established context plot, point of view, sensory details, dialogue, and suspense).
S.DS.06.04 plan a focused and coherent informational presentation using an informational
organizational pattern (e.g., problem/solution, sequence); select a focus question to address and
organize the message to ensure that it matches the intent and the audience to which it will be
delivered.
Strand 4: Listening and Viewing

L.CN.06.02 listen to or view critically while demonstrating appropriate social skills of audience
behaviors (e.g., eye contact, attentive, supportive); critically examine the verbal and non-verbal
strategies during speeches and presentations.
L.RP.06.01 listen to or view knowledgeably a variety of genre to summarize, take notes on key
points, and ask clarifying questions.

Essential (Guiding) questions:

What are ways you can better understand yourself by reading and interacting with the
novel?
What are the main themes and symbols of the novel and how can you relate to them?

Digital Storytelling Sources:


1. Sparknotes.com: Sparknotes is a very helpful tool for reading and understanding literature.
Sparknotes offers chapter summaries, contextual information, thematic information, character
descriptions and analyses. Sparknotes can allow students to read summaries and/or condensed
versions of the text as another way for understanding the material and as another perspective on
the novel. I will use sparknotes as supplement to give to the students when they read at home. I
will tell them to use it before and after reading to look at summaries and analyses.
2. PollEverywhere.com: PollEverywhere is a tool that can be used for class discussion and for
quizzes. With this tool, the teacher can post questions on the projector and students can use
devices such as cell phones or iPads to answer the questions. Also, PollEverywhere can be used
for students to openly write discussion topics or responses that can be posted to the teacher or the
whole class.
3. Storybird.com: Storybird is a website that allows students to digitally create artistic stories
and creations of their own. This website allows for student to creatively produce something that
they can truly call their own.
4. Slidestory.com: Slidestory allows students to combine their narrations with pictures to create
stories or narratives of their own that has a combination of written and visual supports.
5. Piclits.com: Piclits allows for students to take a picture and place words on it as a means for
describing or helping to better understand the picture. This allows for students to use and expand
their vocabulary.
***Storybird, Slidestory and Piclits are all sources that I will encourage students to use on their
final project.

Ways the Unit Will Incorporate Culturally Relevant Teaching


Being aware of culture is extremely pedagogically relevant. Throughout the unit, I will offer
opportunities for students of different learning styles to embrace his or her particular learning
style. The novel will be read in a variety of ways: silent and individual reading; class reading
and turn taking; teacher reading to the students; and students listening to audio recordings of the
readings. By having these various reading strategies, students of different learning styles will
have the opportunity to flourish. Throughout the unit, there will be various times where students
will be asked to write, based on different prompts. Oftentimes I will offer prompts of varying
difficulties so that each student-from higher achieving students to lower achieving students- will
all have the opportunity to write about topics that they fully understand.
Next, the novel being read, Hatchet, is culturally relevant to the students in this context. The
protagonist of the novel is a 13 year old boy, which I feel like is very relatable to the 6th grade
students. I feel that the students will be able to develop a deep connection with this character
and this novel because many of the themes and issues in the novel are relatable and realistic
issues that many of the students may be dealing with.

Overview of Reading Strategies


There will be four main reading strategies: class reading and turn taking; teacher reading to the
students; and students listening to audio recordings of the readings. Throughout the unit,
students will read all of these ways. Silent reading allows for students to go at their own
individual pace and check for understanding in their own ways. Turn taking and reading with the
class is a way for students to gain other perspectives on how the book can be read, while also
forcing students to speak in front of their peers, which will develop communicative and speaking
skill. By reading to the students, I will give them the opportunity to hear how I (as a teacher)
think the book should be read. Pedagogically, reading to the students is a form of modeling; I
will be modeling to them how the book should be read, providing them with a good idea of how
they should read the book when they are reading alone. Lastly, audio recordings will be played as
a form of reading. The audio recordings will help to develop the listening skills of the students.
I will encourage students to follow along and read with the recording, which will incorporate
silent reading with listening and will allow students the chance to flourish more as a silent reader
or as a listener, based on individual and cultural differences.

Assessments

There will be a variety of assessments throughout the duration of the unit. There will be a
combination of formative and summative assessment throughout the unit. Periodically, there will
be summative reading quizzes that assess student comprehension of the reading. The reading
quizzes will consist of mostly concrete questions that check for understanding of the text as well
as checking that the students have done the reading. At various time throughout the unit,
students will have opportunities to anonymously write to the teacher. As a teacher, I will
encourage students to write questions or concerns that they have with the material, assignments
or teaching methods. I will also encourage the students to write things that they found most
useful and least useful, as well as assignments or activities they liked and/or didnt like. These
anonymous writings are a formative assessment that will help me gauge what the students find
most useful, what they enjoy and what is most effective. There will be many assignments
throughout the unit that require students to write and expand upon ideas. All students writing
will be a form of formative assessment that I will be able to use to analyze and use to better
understand my students. At the end of the unit, the students will do a project that culminates
everything that they have learned.

LESSON 1: INTRODUCTION OF CONTEXT AND PREDICTIONS


Standards Addressed in the lesson:
L.RP.06.01 listen to or view knowledgeably a variety of genre to summarize, take notes on key
points, and ask clarifying questions.
W.PR.06.04 draft focused ideas for a specific purpose using multiple paragraphs, sentence
variety, and voice to meet the needs of an audience (e.g., word choice, level of formality, and use
of example) when writing compositions.
Learning Goals:

The students to be primed for the reading that they will be doing.

Also, students will recognize a context for the novel, which will help them gain a better
understanding of the novel.

Students will develop listening and note-taking skills

Student will make predictions about the novel based on contextual knowledge

Guided Practice/Extension/Application:
The students will be asked to make predictions based on contextual information that will be
given to them. Students will apply their knowledge of the context of the novel to make
predictions.

Step-By-Step of Learning Activities:


First, I will present the students with a powerpoint presentation about the context of the novel. I
will instruct students to ask questions and take notes on the presentation. After the powerpoint
presentation, I will ask students to all write down predictions of what the book will be about,
characters in the book or events in the book. I will instruct students to write down at least five
predictions about the novel. After time is given to write predictions, students will be asked to
share some of their ideas with the class and we will discuss the rationale behind the ideas.
Formative Assessment:
Students will be asked to turn in their predictions at the end of class. This will show me how
they took in the information about the context and how well they applied that information.
Homework: None
Materials:

Paper

Writing utensils

Context Powerpoint

Quiz Questions (Appendix A)

LESSON 2: READ CH. 1 and 2


Standards Addressed in the lesson:
W.GR.06.01 in the context of writing, correctly use style conventions (e.g., Modern Language
Association Handbook) and a variety of grammatical structures in writing including indefinite
and predicate pronouns; transitive and intransitive verbs; adjective and adverbial phrases;
adjective and adverbial subordinate clauses; comparative adverbs and adjectives; superlatives,
conjunctions; compound sentences; appositives; independent and dependent clauses;
introductory phrases; periods; commas; quotation marks; and use of underlining and italics for
specific purposes.
W.SP.06.01 in the context of writing, correctly spell frequently encountered and frequently
misspelled words.
W.HW.06.01 write neat and legible compositions.

R.MT.06.01 self-monitor comprehension when reading or listening to text by automatically


applying and discussing the strategies used by mature readers to increase comprehension
including: predicting, constructing mental images, visually representing ideas in text,
questioning, rereading or listening again if uncertain about meaning, inferring, summarizing, and
engaging in interpretive discussions.
Learning Goals:

Gain an synthesis of the first two chapters

Listen to other students read and be able to follow along with the reading

Construct listening skills

Relate to personal experiences

Guided Practice/Extension/Application:
Students will apply their speaking and listening skills while doing the reading as a class.
Students will expand upon the reading at the end of the lesson by writing on various prompts
about the first two chapters. Students will periodically discuss different aspects of the novel as
we are reading.
Step-By-Step of Learning Activities:
As a class, we will read the first two chapters of the novel. For determining who will read, I will
simply call on different students to read at different points of time. Intermittently, we will pause
in reading and discuss various topics and check for understanding. After the reading, I will give
students a short quiz. After the quiz, I will give students a freewrite to get them thinking and
writing about the first couple of chapters.
Formative Assessment:
During the reading, I will intermittently pause and assess for understanding and clear up any
concerns or lack of understanding. The reading quiz will assess student comprehension of the
first two chapters.
Homework: Read Chapter 3 and 4
Materials:

The novel Hatchet

Paper

Writing utensils

Writing prompts:
o

What do you think is going to happen next?

What would you do if you were stranded in the forest?

LESSON 3: CH. 3 AND 4 DISCUSSION AND GEOGRAPHY INTEGRATION PART 1


Standards Addressed in the lesson:
R.MT.06.01 self-monitor comprehension when reading or listening to text by automatically
applying and discussing the strategies used by mature readers to increase comprehension
including: predicting, constructing mental images, visually representing ideas in text,
questioning, rereading or listening again if uncertain about meaning, inferring, summarizing, and
engaging in interpretive discussions.
R.AT.06.01 be enthusiastic about reading and do substantial reading and writing on their own.
Learning Goals:

Share and expand ideas about chapter 3 and 4

Gain a better recognition of the geography and climate of the setting in the book

Classify the differences in climate that the main character is undergoing

Guided Practice/Extension/Application:
Extension of the readings will occur on the discussion. Students will pose questions about the
novel and we will answer and expand upon those questions in class. The context of the novel
will also be made clearer and more understandable by the students through the geography and
climate assignment. This assignment will be interdisciplinary and will also allow students to
gain a better understanding of the setting in the novel.
Step-By-Step of Learning Activities:
Class will start with a short reading quiz over chapters 3 and 4. After the quiz we will have a
short class discussion about the chapters. I will ask students to come up with any questions they
have. I will write 5-10 of their questions on the board, depending on the complexity of the
questions. As a class, we will briefly discuss each question. After the short discussion, we will
segway into the geography portion. The main character of the novel is travelling from New York
to Northern Canada. Students will use computers to research the geography and climate of the
area where the main character comes from, where he is going and where he is trapped at.

Formative Assessment:
The questions that the students pose for the discussion will serve as a formative assessment for
me. It will show me what the students are confused about in the novel, and will help me learn
where I need to focus and steer future directions. The short reading quiz will assess whether or
not the students comprehend the novel.
Homework: NONE
Materials:

Geography and Climate assignment sheet (Appendix B)

Paper

Writing Utensil

LESSON 4: CH. 5 AND 6


Standards Addressed in the lesson:
L.CN.06.02 listen to or view critically while demonstrating appropriate social skills of audience
behaviors (e.g., eye contact, attentive, supportive); critically examine the verbaland non-verbal
strategies during speeches and presentations.
L.RP.06.01 listen to or view knowledgeably a variety of genre to summarize, take notes on key
points, and ask clarifying questions.
Learning Goals:

Gain comprehension of chapter 5 and 6

Enhancelistening skills

Enhance discussion skills

Relate to personal experiences

Guided Practice/Extension/Application:
Students will apply their speaking and listening skills while doing the reading as a class.
Students will expand upon the reading at the end of the lesson by writing on various prompts
about the first two chapters. Students will periodically discuss different aspects of the novel as
we are listening to the reading.

Step-By-Step of Learning Activities:


As a class, we will listen to an audio recording of chapters 5 and 6. Intermittently, we will pause
the audio recording and discuss various topics and check for understanding. After the audio
recording of the chapters is over, I will give students a short quiz. After the quiz, I will give
students a free write to get them thinking and writing about chapters 5 and 6. For the free write I
will ask students to simply write down anything that they think or feel is relevant to the novel.
This will truly be free write.
Formative Assessment:
During the reading, I will intermittently pause and assess for understanding and clear up any
concerns or lack of understanding. The reading quiz will assess student comprehension of the
first two chapters.
Homework: Read Ch. 7 and 8
Materials:

Writing Utensils

Paper

LESSON 5: CH. 7 AND 8 AND FINISH GEOGRAPHY/CLIMATE ASSIGNMENT


Standards Addressed in the lesson:
R.MT.06.01 self-monitor comprehension when reading or listening to text by automatically
applying and discussing the strategies used by mature readers to increase comprehension
including: predicting, constructing mental images, visually representing ideas in text,
questioning, rereading or listening again if uncertain about meaning, inferring, summarizing, and
engaging in interpretive discussions.
R.AT.06.01 be enthusiastic about reading and do substantial reading and writing on their own.
Learning Goals:

Share and expand ideas about chapter 3 and 4

Incorporate interdisciplinary geography

Gain a better understanding of the geography and climate of the setting in the book

Classify the differences in climate that the main character is undergoing

Guided Practice/Extension/Application:
Extension of the readings will occur on the discussion. Students will pose questions about the
novel and we will answer and expand upon those questions in class. The context of the novel
will also be made clearer and more understandable by the students through the geography and
climate assignment. This assignment will be interdisciplinary and will also allow students to
gain a better understanding of the setting in the novel.
Step-By-Step of Learning Activities:
Class will start with a short reading quiz over chapters 7 and 8. After the quiz we will have a
short class discussion about the chapters. I will ask students to come up with any questions they
have. I will write 5-10 of their questions on the board, depending on the complexity of the
questions. As a class, we will briefly discuss each question. After the short discussion, we will
segway into the geography portion. Students will take the research that they have done on the
geography and climate and work on the poster/map that they will be making for the assignment
for the duration of the class.
Formative Assessment:
The questions that the students pose for the discussion will serve as a formative assessment for
me. It will show me what the students are confused about in the novel, and will help me learn
where I need to focus and steer future directions. The short reading quiz will assess whether or
not the students comprehend the novel.
Homework: NONE
Materials:

Paper

Writing Utensils

Art Supplies

LESSON 6: READ TO STUDENTS CH. 9 AND 10 AND VOCABULARY BUILDER


Standards Addressed in the lesson:
R.WS.06.01 explain and use word structure, sentence structure, and prediction to aid in decoding
and understanding the meanings of words encountered in context.
R.WS.06.03 automatically recognize frequently encountered words in print with the number of
words that can be read fluently increasing steadily across the school year.

L.CN.06.02 listen to or view critically while demonstrating appropriate social skills of audience
behaviors (e.g., eye contact, attentive, supportive); critically examine the verbaland non-verbal
strategies during speeches and presentations.
L.RP.06.01 listen to or view knowledgeably a variety of genre to summarize, take notes on key
points, and ask clarifying questions.
Learning Goals:

Expand listening comprehension skills

Expand upon new ideas about the novel

Create a wider vocabulary

Guided Practice/Extension/Application:
Students will extend their own vocabulary by finding any words in the novel that they do not
know. Students will then use these words to research what they mean and will use them in future
assignments.
Step-By-Step of Learning Activities:
First, we will start the class off with me (teacher) reading to the class chapters 9 and 10. This
will allow students to listen to the way, I as the teacher read it, and will allow me to model for
the students how the text should be read. I will stop at key points and pose questions to the
students for discussion and to also make sure they are still paying attention. After I am finished
reading, I will administer the short reading quiz. After the quiz, students will work on the
vocabulary assignment for the rest of the class.
Formative Assessment:
The reading quiz will assess that the students read. The vocabulary assignment will assess the
level of vocabulary of the students.
Homework: NONE
Materials:

Paper

Writing Utensil

Vocabulary Assignment (Appendix C)

LESSON 7: CH. 11 AND 12 AND FINISH VOCABULARY ASSIGNMENT


Standards Addressed in the lesson:
R.WS.06.01 explain and use word structure, sentence structure, and prediction to aid in decoding
and understanding the meanings of words encountered in context.
R.WS.06.03 automatically recognize frequently encountered words in print with the number of
words that can be read fluently increasing steadily across the school year.
R.MT.06.01 self-monitor comprehension when reading or listening to text by automatically
applying and discussing the strategies used by mature readers to increase comprehension
including: predicting, constructing mental images, visually representing ideas in text,
questioning, rereading or listening again if uncertain about meaning, inferring, summarizing, and
engaging in interpretive discussions.
R.AT.06.01 be enthusiastic about reading and do substantial reading and writing on their own.
Learning Goals:

Gain an understanding of chapter 5 and 6

Listen to a recording of these chapters and be able to follow along in the book

Develop listening skills

Develop discussion skills

Guided Practice/Extension/Application:
Students will continue work on their vocabulary lesson assignment
Step-By-Step of Learning Activities:
First, we will start off reading the chapters as a class. To read, I will ask for students to
volunteer. Whoever volunteers will then choose the next person to read. Periodically, I will stop
the reading to discuss relevant topics and themes. After the reading is finished, the students will
do a short reading quiz. After the quiz, students will be asked to finish their vocabulary lesson. At
the end of class, I will ask students to anonymously write on scrap piece of paper any questions
or concerns that they have about anything about the unit or class. This will be an exit ticket.
Formative Assessment:
The reading quiz will serve as a formative assessment to check for understanding of the reading
and to see if students followed along well. As before, the vocabulary will be an assessment to
see what words students find challenging and how well their range of vocabulary is. The exit

ticket will serve as a formative assessment for students to ask questions and display things they
might not be comfortable displaying if it was not anonymous.
Homework: Read Ch. 13 and 14
Materials:

Paper

Writing Utensil

Vocabulary Assignment Sheet (Appendix C)

LESSON 8: CH 13 AND 14 QUIZ AND WRITING ASSIGNMENT


Standards Addressed in the lesson:
W.PR.06.01 set a purpose, consider audience, and replicate authors styles and patterns when
writing a narrative or informational piece.
W.PR.06.02 apply a variety of pre-writing strategies for both narrative (e.g., graphic organizers
designed to develop a plot that includes major and minor characters, builds climax, and uses
dialogue to enhance a theme) and informational writing (e.g., problem/solution or sequence).
Learning Goals:

Display knowledge of and understanding of chapters 13 and 14

Begin to do pre-writing for larger writing assignment

Develop writing skills

Guided Practice/Extension/Application:
Students will work on a pre-writing activity, based on the novel. This activity will allow them to
apply and develop their writing skills.
Step-By-Step of Learning Activities:
First, I will start the class off with a reading quiz over the assigned chapters. Following, I will
address questions or comments that students had from the previous days exit ticket. After this, I
will give students the writing assignment sheet and write on the board examples of prewriting.
Formative Assessment:

The prewriting that students do will serve as a formative assessment. The prewriting will show
how the students think about the topic and will help to shape their final product.
Homework: Use Prewriting to Write Rough Draft
Materials:

Paper

Writing Utensils

Writing Assignment: Theme (Appendix D)

Prewriting examples from English Teachers Companion


o

Graphic Strategies for Generating and Organizing Ideas (pg.83)

The Shapes of Thought: Tools for Writers and Readers (pg. 81)

LESSON 9: CH. 15 AND 16 AUDIO RECORDINGS AND PEER REVIEW


Standards Addressed in the lesson:
W.PR.06.05 proofread and edit writing using grade-level checklists and other appropriate
resources both individually and in groups.
W.GR.06.01 in the context of writing, correctly use style conventions (e.g., Modern Language
Association Handbook) and a variety of grammatical structures in writing including indefinite
and predicate pronouns; transitive and intransitive verbs; adjective and adverbial phrases;
adjective and adverbial subordinate clauses; comparative adverbs and adjectives; superlatives,
conjunctions; compound sentences; appositives; independent and dependent clauses;
introductory phrases; periods; commas; quotation marks; and use of underlining and italics for
specific purposes.
L.CN.06.02 listen to or view critically while demonstrating appropriate social skills of audience
behaviors (e.g., eye contact, attentive, supportive); critically examine the verbaland non-verbal
strategies during speeches and presentations.
L.RP.06.01 listen to or view knowledgeably a variety of genre to summarize, take notes on key
points, and ask clarifying questions.
Learning Goals:

Use and develop listening skills

Critique peer work

Accept and use criticism of work

Guided Practice/Extension/Application:
The peer review session will allow students to practice looking for grammar or semantic
mistakes and allow them to further understand other perspectives.
Step-By-Step of Learning Activities:
First, students will listen to an audio version of chapters 15 and 16, with periodic pauses for
discussion or questions. After listening to these chapters, the students will take a short reading
quiz. After the quiz, students will peer review their rough drafts. For the peer review, I will
count off the students into groups of three. The students will read over one anothers papers and
rotate to the next person when I tell them to do so. During the first rotation, student will be
reviewing only for grammar. After the first rotation, students will review the papers in another
rotation, only this time they will be reviewing for semantics and meaning. After the review
session, each student will have peer feedback about grammar and semantics from two students.
Formative Assessment:
The reading quiz is a formative assessment to check for understanding of the reading.
Homework: Read Chapter 17 and 18
Materials:

Paper

Writing Utensils

Rough Draft

LESSON 10: WORK DAY FOR FINAL ESSAY


Standards Addressed in the lesson:
W.GN.06.01 write a cohesive narrative piece such as a personal narrative, adventure, tall tale,
folktale, fantasy, or poetry that includes appropriate conventions to the genre, employing
elements of characterization for major and minor characters; internal and/or external conflict;
and issues of plot, theme, and imagery
W.GR.06.01 in the context of writing, correctly use style conventions (e.g., Modern Language
Association Handbook) and a variety of grammatical structures in writing including indefinite

and predicate pronouns; transitive and intransitive verbs; adjective and adverbial phrases;
adjective and adverbial subordinate clauses; comparative adverbs and adjectives; superlatives,
conjunctions; compound sentences; appositives; independent and dependent clauses;
introductory phrases; periods; commas; quotation marks; and use of underlining and italics for
specific purposes.
W.SP.06.01 in the context of writing, correctly spell frequently encountered and frequently
misspelled words.
W.HW.06.01 write neat and legible compositions.
Learning Goals:

Use peer review feedback to work on final essay

Step-By-Step of Learning Activities:


Students will first take a reading quiz. After the quiz, students will be given the remainder of the
time to work on their essays.
Homework: Finish Essay
Materials:

Paper

Writing utensil

Computer

Rough Draft and peer feedback

LESSON 11: CH 19 AND EPILOGUE READ TO CLASS AND INTRODUCTION TO FINAL


PROJECT
Standards Addressed in the lesson:
R.MT.06.01 self-monitor comprehension when reading or listening to text by automatically
applying and discussing the strategies used by mature readers to increase comprehension
including: predicting, constructing mental images, visually representing ideas in text,
questioning, rereading or listening again if uncertain about meaning, inferring, summarizing, and
engaging in interpretive discussions.
Learning Goals:

Develop listening skills

Learn how to use different online tools

Compare and contrast predictions and the novel

Make connections

Step-By-Step of Learning Activities:


First, the lesson will start out with me reading chapter 19 and the prologue to the students. I will
periodically stop and pause to discuss. After the reading I will hand students back the
predictions that they made on day 1. We will then have a discussion about comparisons and
contrasts of the students predictions and the actual novel. After the discussion I will give a short
reading quiz. After the quiz I will handout the assignment sheet for the final project and give
students an opportunity to ask questions. With any extra time that is left, I will give students the
chance to play around with the different digital storytelling tools and learn how to use them.
Formative Assessment:
By comparing the predictions of the students, I will be able to expose the different perspectives
of the book. The reading quiz will also assess for concrete understanding of the last chapters.
Homework: NONE
Materials:

Paper

Writing Utensil

Final Project Assignment Sheet (Appendix E)

LESSON 12: PROJECT WORK DAY

LESSON 13: PROJECT WORK DAY

LESSON 14: PROJECT PRESENTATIONS


Standards Addressed in the lesson:

S.CN.06.03 present in standard American English if it is their first language. (Students whose
first language is not English will present in their developing version of standard American
English.
S.DS.06.04 plan a focused and coherent informational presentation using an informational
organizational pattern (e.g., problem/solution, sequence); select a focus question to address and
organize the message to ensure that it matches the intent and the audience to which it will be
delivered.
Learning Goals:

Students will use speaking skills to present projects

Students will use listening skills to listen to other people present

Step-By-Step of Learning Activities:


Students will present their projects, one at a time to the class.

LESSON 15: PROJECT PRESENTATIONS


Standards Addressed in the lesson:
S.CN.06.03 present in standard American English if it is their first language. (Students whose
first language is not English will present in their developing version of standard American
English.
S.DS.06.04 plan a focused and coherent informational presentation using an informational
organizational pattern (e.g., problem/solution, sequence); select a focus question to address and
organize the message to ensure that it matches the intent and the audience to which it will be
delivered.
Learning Goals:

Students will use speaking skills to present projects

Students will use listening skills to listen to other people present

Step-By-Step of Learning Activities:


Students will present their projects, one at a time to the class.

Appendix A
Reading Quizzes
*For all of the reading quizzes, I will read the questions aloud to the students and they will write
the answers on scrap paper. This is a means to save resources and time.

Ch. 1-2 Quiz:


1. Why is Brian flying to Canada? To Visit his father
2. What happens to the pilot? He has a heart attack as he is flying the plane
3. What does Brians mother give him before he leaves for Canada? A Hatchet

Ch. 3-4 Quiz:


1. Where does the plane land? It crashes into a lake
2. What does Brian discover is The Secret? He sees his mother kissing another man
3. Where is Brian? In the middle of nowhere at a lake.

Ch.5-6
1. What is one thing about the woods that Brian has that he doesnt have in the city? Silence
2. When he returns home, what does Brian decide he will tell his father? The Secret

Ch. 7-8
1. What made Brian ill? Berries that he ate the day before
2. What does Brian encounter at the raspberry patch? A Bear
3. What attacks Brian? A porcupine

Ch. 9-10 (Free Quiz Day)

1. What is your favorite part of the book so far?


Ch. 11-12
1. What does Brian Realize he can use for food? Fish in the lake
2. What kind of tool does Brian use for getting his food? A spear for catching fish
3. What does Brian see in the sky above him? A plane

Ch. 13-14
1. How does Brian try to commit suicide? By cutting himself with his hatchet
2. What happens to the eggs that Brian stores? A skunk eats them
3. How does Brian decide to store fish? He builds a small pond to put them in

Ch. 15-16
1. What is the first meat that Brian eats? Foolbirds
2. What two bad things happen to Brian? He is attacked by a moose and a tornado destroys his
shelter

Ch. 17-18
1. What does Brian want to retrieve from the plane? A survival kit
2. What does Brian make to get to the plane? A raft out of logs
3. What does Brian do when he gets back to his shelter? Falls right asleep

Ch. 19 and Epilogue


1. Why do you think Brian never actually tells his father The Secret?

Appendix B
Geography and Climate Assignment
Brian comes from the city of New York and was on a journey to a place far away from the city
(Canada). However, Brian is stranded out in the wilderness somewhere in between. For this
assignment, you will have to do research on the geography and climate on the following places:
New York City, Northern Canada, and somewhere in between (wherever Brian is stranded).
Research will be done in class in the computer lab. After research is done, you will create a map.
The map should contain the following:

A map of North America

A special mark for New York City, Northern Canada, and the place where Brian is

Graphic depictions (pictures or drawings of the climate or weather of each of the places)

The approximate route that Brian was on before his plane crashed

This assignment is meant to help you better understand the setting and the place in the novel. Be
creative!

Appendix C
Vocabulary Assignment
All books are filled with a wide range of different vocabulary. This novel is no different.
However, there are always words that you do not understand. For this assignment, you will need
to scan through the parts of the book that you have already read and find 15 words that you are
not quite sure about the meaning of. You will then look up the definitions of all of these words.
Using the definitions, you will write five sentences for each word. Each sentence must contain
that specific word. Keep these vocabulary words in mind because you will need to incorporate
them into future writing assignments.
Once you have finished writing all of your sentences you need to find a partner. You will read
your sentences with your partner and your partner will write down his or her definition of each
word, based on your use of the word on your sentences. Each partner will do this for the other
partner. At the end you will both have a list of your own definitions for your partners
vocabulary words. I will be around the room to help or answer any questions.

Appendix D
Writing Assignment: Theme
In this novel, there are many different possible themes. You are to choose one of the following
themes to write about:

Man vs. Nature

The Power of Positive Thinking

Becoming a man

City vs. Wilderness Environments

Dreams and Reality

If you know of or can think of another theme that you want to write about, just run it by me first.
Once you choose a theme you are to give evidence of the theme from the novel. You should
include at least three quotations from the novel your paper.
For the second part of your paper, you are going to think about the theme, the novel and your
own life and then tie all three of them together. In this part, you need to write about how you can
personally relate to the theme that you are writing about.
The paper should be at least 1.5 pages, double spaced, in 12 point font.
We will be working on this in class and we will be doing prewriting and peer editing.

Appendix E
Culminating Unit Project
This novel has been great to read, but I am sure many of you were going over multiple ideas in
your mind about how it could have ended differently. For this final project, I want you to take
everything that you have gotten out of reading this novel and put it all together. Take into
consideration all of the discussions we had, the papers you wrote about and all the activities we
have done. With all this information in mind, I want you to write a new ending to the story. The
ending must be relevant, make sense and be consistent with the rest of the novel. There is a twist
to this assignment: you must use some form of digital storytelling to create this new ending.
Digital storytelling is any digital tool that you use to help tell a story. You cannot just simply
write the new ending in Microsoft Word. Here is a list of a few good digital storytelling tools
that you may use:
1. Storybird.com: Storybird is a website that allows you to digitally create artistic stories and
creations of their own. This website allows for you to creatively produce something that you can
truly call you own.
2. Slidestory.com: Slidestory allows you to combine your narrations with pictures to create
stories or narratives of your own that has a combination of written and visual supports.
3. Piclits.com: Piclits allows for you to take a picture and place words on it as a means for
describing or helping to better understand the picture. This allows for you to use and expand
your vocabulary.

You are not limited to just these tools. If you find another tool that you want to use. Just run it
by me. You will have two class periods to work on this project. If you need any more time, then
you have to use your own time. After the projects are finished, we will spend two class periods
presenting the projects to the rest of the class. This will give the opportunity to enhance and use
your speaking skills in front of the whole class. Remember to think outside of the box and to be
as creative as you can.