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Sammy Dawson
Mr. Herrmann & Mr. Rutherford
AP World History
11 July 2015
Chapter 1: The Americans

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Indians were not necessarily the savages they were made out to be. They had sophisticated ways
of living and complicated systems in place to stay alive. Some were even more advanced than
some Europeans had at the time.
The Indians lives were based off of fear. Fear of their gods, fear of other tribes, and fear of not
being able to survive. They lived in a world that was laced with anxiety at every turn.
These Americans were on the cusp of developmental change. If the English had not come when
they did, the natives may had developed just as their European counterparts.
The fur trade was the beginning of the end for the Native Americans. The shift of focus from
their traditional ways messed up the careful balance in their society for survival.
Questions/ Links:
What was the specific role of a shaman in an Indian tribe?
http://www.warpaths2peacepipes.com/native-american-culture/shaman.htm
What were some of the rituals the Indians performed to keep their gods happy?
http://www.oocities.org/moore_brandon_54601/AlgonandIorquois.html
http://www.joyofsects.com/world/indians.shtml#section4
What are more details on the Iroquois League and what they did?
https://www.mpm.edu/wirp/ICW-155.html
What were the roles of women in Native American tribes?
http://www.indians.org/articles/native-american-women.html
http://teachinghistory.org/history-content/ask-a-historian/23931
Chapter 2: Death on a Coastal Fringe

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Thoughts/Comments:
Just as the Native Americans of the time, the Europeans lives were changing as the discovery of
the Americas brought new goods and competition to their world.
The main purpose of the companies that sent men out to explore was for money and power.
Although they claimed it was under the name of God, I find that it was all driven by egoistic
powers of the government, not really understanding what they were getting themselves into.
The Englishs perception of the Native Americans were obscured by their history with the Irish
and fighting between them. Even today, people make a presumption about others based on past
experience. This may have majorly affected the way that the English interacted with the Native
Americans.
The English lived in a superstitious time as well. They were run by fear just as much as the
Native Americans in the unpredictability of life.

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5. Although the Native Americans were known for some of their violent actions, the English were
just as bad with their punishments and persecutions of different people. Both peoples were just as
violent as each other.
6. The English were bound to have issues even before they got to the Americas. There was fighting
on the ships among themselves. The issues from the class system over in Europe followed them
as the educated and the less educated was put together for survival and the balance as they once
understood it was disturbed. Education didnt exactly mean survival.
7. During the Jamestown settlement process, peace treaty attempts (such as those with the
Powhatans) were just covering the underlying and continuous violence that was beginning to
grow between the Native Americans and English. Both sides were intent on survival and the
differences in culture and goals kept them from being able to have peace.
8. The violence and vitiousness that both sides met each other with is not far off from some of the
violence that continues between people today, even a couple centuries later. Humans have an
innate instinct to protect their own, even if it results in disasters that could have been worked out
in a different way.
Questions/Links:
1. What was Adam Smiths childhood like and how did he end up the way he did?
a. http://www.biography.com/people/john-smith-9486928#jamestown-settlement
2. What was the government system like for the Powhatans?
a. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powhatan
3. What were the economic gains of colonizing North America?
a. http://schoolworkhelper.net/reasons-for-settlement-of-north-america-religion-politics-economics/
Chapter 3: The Hammerours Regime

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Thoughts/Comments
The companies are now coming up with a whole new plan for colonization and I think that they
are finally realizing the reality of what is really needed in the new land.
New settlers were definitely given the sugar-coated version of what North America was like.
The constant battle between the Native Americans and the English was so brutal. But the Native
Americans originally started trying to protect the land they had always known. The English
brought something else into the picture when they started a senseless, brutal killing.
The excuse that the English had for their killings (that it was for God and a civilized ending
justified their actions) was just so they didnt feel guilty about being as brutal as the peoples that
they claimed were the devils spawn.
The way that the colonies were successful was through the rigid, military routine that was set up
for the survival of the new settlers. Although some of their treatment was harsh and sometimes
even cruel, this was one of the main reasons that the colonies survived.
The huge misunderstanding between the Indians and the English regarding Pocahontass
marriage shows how when we are not educated on the cultures of others, bad things can happen.
The ignorance of not wanting to understand each other would lead to years of issues and blood
shed.

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Questions/Links
What specific goods were sent back to England from the colonies?
http://study.com/academy/lesson/the-13-colonies-developing-economy-overseas-trade.html
What is an English hundred?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hundred_%28county_division%29
Why was Dale so successful in setting up his colonies?
http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Dale_Sir_Thomas_d_1619
Chapter 4: Recruitment, Expansion, and Transformation

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Thoughts/Comments
The propaganda that Sandys put out was a completely sugar-coated version of the Americas. His,
and other companies, desperation to recruit new people would lead to the death of many. I think
that even today, people should not always trust what big companies, and the government, tells
them.
Bringing over vagrant children actually gave them a new chance. Although the journey was
dangerous, and living in the new land was even worse, these kids would have a chance to not live
in complete poverty. This chance to work hard and grow up with land was better than the life
they would have lived in England.
These people who were coming over and lived in the new lands were ignorant in some ways to
how fragile their world was. They were surrounded by angry Native Americans, exposed to
disease and overpopulating a place that was only producing so much food and still hundreds
were sent over. In the past colonies, a lack of a plan and ignorance of the land around them ended
up killing many, many people. Taking short cuts never works out.
People from different classes, different countries, different customs and different religions were
coming together in a borderline primitive society. There are bound to be trouble with this as
people clash together, especially in times of stress.
Women were seen as property, to be sold to the farmer who could pay the most. And at the
beginning, to come over, they had to prove they were good enough to be married off. It is
incredible to think that the world considered women so fragile for so long.
Questions/Links
Why does propaganda work so well on the public?
https://www.stormfront.org/forum/t617256/
What are more details about womens role in society and how they were seen?
http://public.gettysburg.edu/~tshannon/341/sites/Gender%20and%20Sexuality/Gender
%20Roles.htm
What were the different religions that had come over to the Americas at this time?
http://atheism.about.com/library/FAQs/religion/blrel_amrel_chron.htm
What was the population growth in Virginia in the 1920s?
http://dunhamwilcox.net/census/census_pop.htm
Chapter 5: A Flood, a Flood of Bloud

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Thought/Comments
In the English eyes, taking the Native Americans and saving them by introducing their culture
and Christianity was the right thing to do. But in doing this, the English were striping a culture
from its peoples, murdering thousands of years of tradition because they thought they were
better. Is taking the identity of a people any different than physically killing them?
After the brutal killing of hundreds of English, the Native Americans saw it as a symbol of
liberation while the English saw it as an act of the devil. Any act of violence throughout history
has two sides of the story. Both want to protect their own, both do things that are not ethical in
the perspective of today.
I think this specific time in colonization was the beginning of the end for the Native Americans.
Before this massacre, the English looked at the Indians as a race to profit off of and educate to
their way of life. Now they are run purely by emotions, hatred, rage and a need for revenge. The
little bit of respect they may have had for the natives is gone now, and blind emotion like this
leads to death and destruction for the next ten years.
In some ways, the English themselves made the Natives the monsters they thought they were.
They were the ones who were disrespectful of the land, the ones who went in and killed any
Natives that wouldnt cooperate, the ones who tried to force their culture onto them. This attack
on them was not from out of the blue, but in part from the actions that they had been doing over
the years. Its similar to a self fulfilling prophecy.
Much of the devastation that happened in the years that followed the massacre had been waiting
to happen because of the mismanagement. Although Sandys brought the colony back to life, he
was purely looking for gains that the company could have in the goods instead of the people. He
lied, cut corners, and ignored the distress calls from the people who couldnt produce food fast
enough to keep up with the people being sent over. The greed and want of advancement built up
to years of starvation and death.
Its an amazing symbol of human strength and determination that even though colonies had
failed, thousands of people had died and the future for those in the Americas was filled with
disease and starvation, still they pushed on. Never did they lose hope or give up, people kept on
going, for the sake of adventure and a brighter future. Although some of the tactics the English
used to stay there was unethical, their determination and ability to adapy is definitely something
to be admired.
Questions/Links
What were the diseases that were killing off the colonists in the 1920s?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disease_in_colonial_America
What factors caused the Virginia Company of London to go completely bankrupt?
http://www.nps.gov/jame/learn/historyculture/the-virginia-company-of-london.htm
Why did tobacco grow so well in Colonial America?
http://www.nps.gov/jame/learn/historyculture/tobacco-colonial-cultivation-methods.htm
What happened to Edwin Sandys after the London Company went bankrupt?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edwin_Sandys_%28died_1629%29

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Chapter 6: Terra-Maria

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Thoughts/Comments
Although the past colonies had bad endings, still people continue to spill over into the new land,
especially after England started having upheavals. Humans have a thirst for new adventures,
even in the face of deadly danger.
Although religion was one of the reasons many of the people in the new land kept hope for so
long, it can also be a large source of instability. These people were bringing an unstable subject
into an unstable world and this is just calling for issues to pop up.
Baltimore told all the Catholics that, in order to not stir any trouble with the Protestants, they
were to be quiet and private with their worship. The irony here is that they left England in order
to be able to worship how they wanted but found they were treated the same in the new land.
I think that the arrogance of the English was one of the main reasons they colonized so well. I
dont believe that their mindset was correct, but their thought that they were the rightful owners
of the land and that God was behind them caused them to have a drive that kept them
determined.
The missionaries had good intentions, in their minds. But it was based on the notion that they
were better than the Indians and that only God could save their damned souls. This mindset could
never really develop peace because the Indians were seen as people underneath the English and
peace and understanding can never develop when one group of people looks down upon another.
The fact that all the settlers were aliens to their environments could have pulled them together in
tough times. But instead everyone was just thinking about themselves and their own beliefs and
this would result in disaster for many people. Instead of using the strange world to unite, it
seemed to pull them apart.
The Jesuits colored Baltimore as some sort of monster for wanting to stop their ministry. But
Baltimore was under enormous stress to balance the Protestants with the Catholics. He didnt
want there to be violence or fighting when he was trying to make a land that could be peaceful
for the Catholics. He was trying his best with what he had, although it turned out bad.
It was sad that all the potential of the Maryland colony was destroyed by its own people and their
intolerance of each other. They were constantly called the Native Americans uncivilized, but the
English were not any better in this new world where they tore the hope of their own world apart.
Questions/Links
What were Catholics status in England at this time?
http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/stuart-england/english-catholics-1603-to-1606/
What was the difference between Catholics and Protestants?
http://www.dts.edu/hendrickscenter/blog/7-key-differences-between-protestant-and-catholicdoctrine-del-rosario-mikel/
What is more information on the people who came over on the Ark?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ark_%28English_ship%29
What exactly is mateship?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mateship

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Chapter 7: The Chesapeakes New World

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Thoughts/Comments
I was shocked to learn that as the plantations started to need more labor as the indentured
servants earned their freedom, the English took their own people and sold them into a system
very similar to slavery. They kidnapped children, forced adults to emigrate, and sold them around
to farmers like property. The need to survive on the plantations seemed to oust any morals
considering the people. Survival seems to do that to humans.
When it comes to the English and the Irish, you are able to see biases that were passed down
generations. They despised each other and treated each other with hatred because of past wars
and differences. This happens all throughout history when one group of people continues to hate
another group because of events that happened years to centuries before. This passing down of
intolerance makes the ability to work together almost impossible.
When the English started to consider using the Africans as a labor force, it never crossed their
minds to treat them like human beings. From the beginning the questions they had about the laws
were corrupt ones. Anyone who was not English were barbarous, and this came through in their
mindset as they created this new network of slavery.
The labors of the first settlers on the land were only just being able to be benefited from. It took
several generations to become stable and secure enough for people to be able to make a profit
and start to be successful. Anything in life takes an adjustment period. All that you can do is hold
on and continue to work hard and hope for the future, which is exactly what they did.
Questions/Links
What is the difference between Puritans and Anglicans?
http://spartacus-educational.com/TUDanglicans.htm
What were the childrens roles in the workforce at the colonies?
http://articles.usa-people-search.com/content-children-in-colonial-america.aspx
What was the Restoration in England?
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-english-restoration
What was the Straffords execution?
http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/world-history/thomas-wentworth-earlstrafford-1593-1641

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Chapter 8: The Dutch Farrago

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Thoughts/Comments
In some ways, it was much easier for the Dutch to settle the land. The English had already carved
out pieces of their own land and killed or driven away many Indians. As a result, the Dutch
colonies focused on many other things besides just survival.
As I read through the book, many times I come across sentences that say this or that person. It
amazes me and saddens me how many people are lost to the gaping mouth of history. Most of us
have that destiny ahead of us, just another statistic in a history book for further generations. Is it
sad? Or should we be glad we have at least this much?
The people of the Dutch colonies desperately wanted some form of an organized government,
perhaps to put some balance into their chaotic, death filled lives. But I think they also didnt
really know what they wanted. They themselves were a product of the violent world around
them.
The leadership of the colonies were complete crap in my opinion. They people higher up were so
busy fighting and bickering among themselves they forgot the real reason they had been put in
that position in the first place. While they scrambled over power, the settlers got more neglected
and restless.
Jonas Michaelius shamed Christianity and all it stands for. His actions were nothing of what a
preachers should have been. I reacted strongly to his story because he is a prime example of
how humans can use and abuse in the name of religion and then give it a bad name.
The fight the common people had against the West India Company was a foreshadowing of when
America would finally break free of Europe decades later. Even then, we see tension building as
the people are tired of being governed by those who do not see the reality of the struggle.
I do not believe Herrman and Van der Donck were horrible men, even if they did bad things
while in politics. They had great minds and great ideas for what could become of the colonies.
They were just very misled in their energies toward what should be accomplished.
Questions/Links
Who were the Walloons and what were their beliefs?
http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/Walloons.aspx
What are quasi-feudal lords?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feudalism
Chapter 9: Carnage and Civility in a Developing Hub of Commerce

Thoughts/Comments
1. Whenever any cultures that are different start to merge, there is always going to be tension. The
Dutch and the English were dealing with the same issues, but unfortunately often only saw the
differences.
2. Whenever humans are run by pure greed, as many of the settlers were when dealing with the
Indians, civility vanishes. The thought process goes to only self-interest, self survival. The direct
result is always going to be violent as contrary beliefs clash together.

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3. I think that Stuyvesants idea that cultural diversity was okay but religious diversity was wrong is
very illogical. Religion is a huge part of culture, intertwined in the most intimate way. To
separate religious ideas from culture is almost impossible to do.
4. As the traders begin to gain power in the government, the Company starts to lose power. This is
good, because now there is a buffer zone between the settlers and the Company. The fact that
traders are now integrating themselves into this part of the colony is showing the stability that is
slowly developing after such chaotic years.
5. Human beings have a strong desire to protect their own in times of instability. The Indians and
the Dutch settlers were filled with fear of their changing worlds. This woke up that protective
instinct. This mindset blocks every logical thought out, and I think thats what happened to both
sides of these brutal conflict. Neither one saw that the other was fighting for the same things.
6. I believe that, although the people of the time gave him much criticism, Stuyvesant was a good
leader. He was stretched thin with chaos on all sides and was trying to keep the peace wherever
conflicts arose. He wasnt perfect, but no leader is. For everything he had to balance, he was
better than a lot of the colonies had.
Questions/Links
1. Who is Baal?
a. http://christianreader.typepad.com/christian_reader/2010/02/who-was-baal.html
2. What were the Quakers beliefs?
a. http://www.quakerinfo.org/quakerism/beliefs
3. What is more information on Margaret Hardenbroeck?
a. http://www.nscdny.org/major-projects/margaret-hardenbroek/
Chapter 10: Swedes, Finns, and the Passion of Pieter Plockhoy

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Thoughts/Comments
Much of America was first settled by those who were seen as criminals by their society. This is
something that many times is not taught in history classes. Often times students hear about hard
working, determined settlers. But not everything is as it seems. Much of the colonies had a
harsh beginning with harsh people.
The leaders, whether its the company, directors or governors, the people are never satisfied.
Maybe this is less about the leaders themselves and more about the chaos that the settlers were
growing up with.
The Finns culture shaped them to be perfect people to settle down in the Americas. They were
used to adapting and figuring out solutions in hard environments. The fact that maybe they
werent as civilized as the English or Dutch may have been the very thing that allowed them to
be more successful when coming over. America needed tough people to settle it, not those
concerned about politics or wars.
I found one paragraph particularly interesting when Israel Acrelius wrote about his feelings to the
generation growing up around him at the time. He was lamenting for the past and how the world
seemed so lost around him. When you look around today, you see people saying the same exact

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thing. It seems that no matter where humans are in time, many pine for a past that cannot come
back and fear the unknown future.
There are specific point in history, where at the time, they seem meaningless and insignificant.
But in fact, there are times where those moments are the ones that will change the world and
cultures forever after. Those that were a part of it were participating in something much bigger
than themselves, but would not be able to see that until it was all history.
I think that the ideas of utopian societies tend to pop up in the world when everything else is
chaotic. Plockhoys ideas were radical because the world was living in a violence, scary time.
His ideas were created by the world in which he lived. Unfortunately, utopian societies rarely
develop the way they are hoped to.
Ideas are one of the most powerful things that human beings create. For even after we die, the
ideas we have planted in this world can grow long after we are gone.
Questions/Links
What was womens role in Swedish society?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_Colonial_Society
Who were the Kalevalans and what were their beliefs?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalevala
Who are the Mennonites and Anabaptists?
http://history.mennonite.net/
What was the Interregnum and what caused it?
https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_Interregnum

Chapter 11: Gods Conventicle, Bradfords Lamentation

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Thoughts/Comments
Through all of the horrible things that humans do, one thing to admire is our determination. The
Pilgrims, though faced with danger and very possible death, still have hope for the future.
Although religion is often something that humans look to for hope, it does not always mean that
there will be peace. Time and time again, people put their prayers in religion but forget the role
that they also play in reality. Religion would not protect them from starvation, or the Indians.
Religion does not mean peace, and unfortunately, this lesson is forgotten throughout history.
The stories that we have learned in school are so different from what actually happened. The
reality was much harsher, violent and volatile. I believe that the parts of history we avoid talking
about are the events we could learn about in order to see the mistakes made and how to avoid
them. There is much to learn from the truth.
Every generation wants to leave behind something for the next. Bradfords words struck me
when he wrote, So much...has been misunderstood, and so much could now, in the perspective
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controversy. How much of history has been lost because of bias and hatred? How much of what
this generation gets is what really happens.
Bradfords sorrow for his crushed hopes comes through the pages two centuries later. His
lamenting echoes millions of people who have disappeared in history with broken dreams. It is
one of the saddest things in life.
Questions/Links
Who were the separatists and what were their beliefs?
http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h575.html
Who were the Brownists and what were their beliefs?
http://www.exlibris.org/nonconform/engdis/brownists.html
What is more information is there about Thomas Morton?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Morton_%28colonist%29
Chapter 12: The New-English Sionists: Fault Lines, Diversity, and Persecution

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Thoughts/Comments
There was one point where Bailyn states that it was not the people who cared little about the religion that
created difficulties but those that were passionate. When people are passionate about something, they
often are convinced that others can benefit from it as well. This could lead to going overboard when
trying to share your passion. I think many of these people crossed over the blurred line of sharing
passionately and enforcing.
John Cotton was correct when he claimed that hereditary was not the correct way to choose the leadership
of the colonies. Just because a father or mother is a powerful leader, does not mean their child will be the
same way. Sometimes the dreams of our parents are not what we live up to.
One huge theme of this chapter is the effect that the culture of your environment has on decisions and
actions that you take. It reminded me of the book Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell. In a stressful
environment, where people want to survive, the last thing they are thinking of is tolerance of those who
are not like them. The collision of these different cultures was bound to cause issues.
Times of great suffering or struggle are often the times where great things happen. It shocks us out of our
usual routine and makes us want to strive for better things. It pushes us to make changes otherwise not
made. Englands intolerance of the religious upheaval taking place made people want a change, a chance.
This pushed people to America like never before. The land that once looked intimidating and filled with
danger was now a place that had opportunity for freedom.
Questions/Links
What is the true story of Mary Tudor?
http://www.luminarium.org/encyclopedia/queenmary.htm
How do close ties affect human interaction?
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/ulterior-motives/201407/why-other-people-are-the-key-ourhappiness
Chapter 13: Abrasions, Utopians, and Holy War

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The opportunities that these people had as they came to America are arguably some of the greatest
humans have had in their hands in a recent history. The land was open, ideas were fresh, and anything

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they imagined was possible in this new land. Unfortunately, many times, how people wanted to use these
opportunities clashed into violence.
It seems from the beginning of time, what we know is what we want to stick with. We see this the most in
generations that are starting to get older as the new one moves in. Younger generations tend to have the
new, radical ideas of their young minds. The older generations tend to want to stay with what they
understand and are used to. This can cause a clash of ideas and was a big factor in the argument between
Ruddock and the General Court.
A society based on religion is not a stable one. Religion is often something that not everyone agrees on
and causes turmoil. To be the thing that society is based around is guaranteeing that there are going to be
issues, especially since religion is something that people are fiercely passionate about. A issue concerning
religion can very easily turn into a violent one as people allow their emotions to take over. This is what is
happening in the colonies at this point in time.
Dangers to our way of life, beliefs, and practices are often attacked from the outside. But nothing is more
dangerous to who we are then what comes from the inside. Erosion from within will destroy faster and
more violently than that from the outside.
Nothing in history ever happens in isolation. Everything affects and influences everything else that is
going on. Often times when reading books that segment parts of history into chapters, it is easy to forget
that much of it is all happening at the same time and is influenced by decades of events beforehand.
Questions/Links
What was the Munster in Germany?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%BCnster
Who were the zealots and what were their beliefs?
https://bible.org/seriespage/6-zealots
What was the General Court ruling over the colonies?
http://score.rims.k12.ca.us/score_lessons/colonial_court/html/colonial_virginia.html
What is the process of enclosure?
http://www.celdf.org/downloads/Enclosure%20or%20inclosure%20is%20the%20process%20which
%20was%20used%20to%20end%20traditional%20rights_1.pdf

Chapter 14: Defiance and Disarray


Thoughts/Comments
1. Anne Hutchinson was rare for her time, a woman who was clever and brave enough to have her
voice heard. The society was afraid of women and what would happen if they were let out of
their oppressed lives under men. I think this is a big reason so much attention was given to Anne
and her trial.
2. In anything in life, sometimes you have to go through struggles before you find yourself. This is
what is happening with the American colonies. It is a land where they have to reinvent much of
what they believed and did. Change is always going to cause turmoil and strife, that is the nature
of change.
3. Fear controlled much of what these people believed. Anything different was considered demonic
because it threatened their way of life. And for many of these people, their beliefs were the one
thing that was keeping them going. To challenge their beliefs was challenging their world.

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4. One thing seen throughout all of history is that where religion is condemned, it tends to flourish
remarkably. To try to take away a persons beliefs can make them more determined to stand by
them.
5. Much of what was happening in the colonies was influenced by the events in England. The
migrations, economy and even way of life was being influenced by England. Even all the way
across the ocean, the place the people had come from was in their lives.
6. The next generation after the long battle for Puritanism found that they werent too interested in
the battles of their fathers. The fight for their religion is the thing that kept that generation alive,
what pushed them across oceans and into unimaginable event. But their predecessors did not
have this deep connections with it. Time goes on and things change, causing things that were
once important to fade away from our timeline.
Questions/Links
1. What was Anne Hutchinsons childhood like?
a. http://www.history.com/topics/anne-hutchinson
2. Who was Lady Deborah Moody?
a. http://www.nscdny.org/major-projects/lady-deborah-moody/
3. What was the Fifth Monarchist?
a. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fifth_Monarchists
4. What is more information on Englands Civil War?
a. http://www.history.com/topics/british-history/english-civil-wars
Chapter 15: The British Americans

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Thoughts/Comments
These early societies were purely run by fear. Fear of death, starvation, violence, Indians, and
internal issues. Fear tends to make people do things that they normally wouldnt and much of
went on those years was fueled by fear. The evidence was from the killing, the grip people had
on religion and the intolerance that permeated the colonies.
This was the first time that this amount of diversity had come together in human history. It was
what would make America so great, but also what would cause so many issues. People didnt
know how to cope. Even today, nearly three centuries later, our society still struggle with total
tolerance and acceptance. Its a never ending battle.
A huge question these people had were who they were. With so much mixing of cultures, some
lost exactly who they were as they tried to find where they fit in. This lost identity could also
cause tensions as people lashed out from their insecurities, trying to hold on to what they knew.
We cant ever forget where we came from and the journey it took to get there, but holding onto
the past too hard can harm as well. This makes it so it is hard to change in a way you can survive
in the new world being created.
The settlers did horrible things to call America their own, things that go against every moral code
in the book. But it was a time of savagery and violence in the face of rivals. Humans have a
natural tendency to want to dominate, call what is not theirs their own. I think the one thing to
think about is this. Today, in our society, we condemn the way the Europeans went about

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a.
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conquering America. But honestly, if we were to be truthful with ourselves, would the people
who are alive today, be any different from those actions the Europeans took? Do humans really
change that much, or do we always have that savage, primitive creature inside us?
Questions/Links
Who were the Huguenots and what were their beliefs?
http://huguenotsocietyofamerica.org/?page=Huguenot-History
Who was the Duke of Alba?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_of_Alba
What was the House of Burgesses?
http://www.ushistory.org/us/2f.asp
What was the Northern Neck controversy?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Neck