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Lesson Plan Template Overview

For a more detailed explanation, including examples, of each section within the
Lesson Plan Template, please view the Lesson Plan Handbook.

Content Area or Developmental Focus: Social/Emotional/Diversity and Character


Age/Grade of Children: 4 years old
Length of Lesson: 20 minutes
Goal
Objective
Standards Included

To see the children able to express emotions/feelings in a healthy way and able
to distinguish between the different emotions.
Help children identify their feelings/emotions and express them.

Ages 3 to 5: Early Learning Guidelines. Click HERE to locate the Early


Learning Guidelines for your state.

Materials
Introduction

Lesson Development:

Differentiation

Assessment
(Practice/ Checking for
Understanding)

Closing

Small Paper plates, markers, flannel board, emotion face cutouts, books,
crayons, popsicle sticks, wiggly eyes, glue
This would be done as a large group activity. We would start out with circle
time and a book related to emotions/feelings. Then as a group we would recall
parts of the story and also express how we are feeling.
Feelings and emotions are very important in a childs development. Feelings
are a part of who we are and expressing them is healthy. With my guidance the
group with express how they feel through art activities, and also work
expressing how we feel to each other in class.
I would do one on one time with a child who may have problems expressing
feelings/emotions. Provide alternative activities for children who seem to have
a difficult time adjusting to the activity.
By using emotion cutouts on the flannel board I would want the children to
show me different emotions when I give them a name of one. I also would
give a recall time for books read to see if the children are understanding the
different emotions.

This lesson is a way of letting children express themselves in a healthy and


productive way. This is beneficial to the emotional/social development of the
child. Also, helps children feel comfortable expressing themselves without
fear of being ridiculed for doing so.

Lesson Plan Template


Developed by Kristina Bodamer and Jennifer Zaur, Full-Time Faculty, College of Education, ECE/CD Department

Content Area or Developmental Focus: Cognitive Development


Age/Grade of Children:4 years old
Length of Lesson: 20 minutes
Goal

Children will be able to distinguish between different shapes after the shape
sorting activity.

Objective
Standards Included

Help children identify different shapes. (e.g circle, square, triangle, etc)
Ages 3 to 5: Early Learning Guidelines. Click HERE to locate the Early
Learning Guidelines for your state.

Materials
Ice trays, shape cut outs, books about shapes, flash cards with shapes
Introduction

Lesson Development

Differentiation
Assessment
(Practice/ Checking for
Understanding)

This lesson is focusing on the cognitive development area. This would be


done in small group for ice tray activity but flash cards, books would be done
in circle (carpet time). This promotes memory and recalling what the children
just saw.
This was developed to help children learn shapes and be able to sort them in
the correct place. Also to help children remember parts of story and flash card
recalled.
One on one time or independent learning for a child who does not learn well
with the group. Guide the child on what to do and see if they can do it.
Let children tell me what each shape is by using the flash cards and also what
shapes are in the room to see how many shapes they remember.

Closing
This activity promotes cognitive development with the focus on shapes. It is
important for children to be able to recognize shapes and is a milestone at this
age. I will continue to promote these types of activities in the classroom

Developed by Kristina Bodamer and Jennifer Zaur, Full-Time Faculty, College of Education, ECE/CD Department

References
Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes. (2014). State-By-State. Retrieved from
http://ceelo.org/state-information/state-map/.
Common Core State Standards Initiative. (2015). Standards by State. Retrieved from
http://www.corestandards.org/standards-in-your-state/
Head Start. (2011). Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework. Retrieved
from: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/teaching/eecd/Assessment/Child
%20Outcomes/HS_Revised_Child_Outcomes_Framework(rev-Sept2011).pdf .
National Center on Child Care Quality Improvement. (2014). State/Territory Early Learning
Guidelines. Retrieved from
https://childcareta.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/state_elgs_web_final.pdf.
Office of Child Care (2015). State Early Learning Guidelines. Retrieved from
https://childcareta.acf.hhs.gov/resource/state-early-learning-guidelines.
The Early Childhood Direction Center. (2006). Developmental Checklists Birth to Five.
Retrieved from
http://www.preschoollearningcenter.org/images/upload/developmental_checklist.pdf

Developed by Kristina Bodamer and Jennifer Zaur, Full-Time Faculty, College of Education, ECE/CD Department