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Intervention)Protocol)

Fly)Fishing)Program)
Hayley)Leishman)
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Intervention Protocol
PROGRAM TITLE: Fly-Fishing Program
PURPOSE: To provide mindful leisure experiences through fly-fishing
that will help develop psychological resources and improve impulse
control and coping skills, with the ultimate goal of a greater sense of
well-being.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Fly fishing is inherently a mindful leisure
activity. This six-week program facilitated individually or in small
groups will teach the fundamental skills of fly fishing with an emphasis
on mindfulness throughout the process. Research shows that
interventions designed to increase mindfulness may reduce impulsivity
that leads to alcohol abuse (as cited in Murphy & MacKillop, 2012, p.
534).
CLIENT PROBLEMS ADDRESSED:
Poor impulse control
Lack of coping skills
Lack of positive leisure experiences
REFERRAL CRITERIA:
By admission to the facility, and
Completion of RT assessment indicates appropriate, and
Physician approval (for off-site travel only)
CONTRAINDICATED CRITERIA:
If ordered by the physician

INTERVENTION TECHNIQUES:
Fly Fishing and Mindfulness
Holding Areas Art Collage
Knot Frustrated
Cycles of Life
Casting for Patience

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 1 Mindfulness
FLY FISHING AND MINDFULNESS
Psychoeducational Intervention
POPULATION: Inpatient Substance Abuse
AGE: Adult
GROUP SIZE: 1-16
SETTING CONSIDERATIONS: Classroom or gym, avoid
distractions like noise.
GROUP STAGE CONSIDERATIONS: Forming, Storming, Norming,
Performing
PURPOSE/GOALS: This intervention will address client problems
related to impulse control, coping skills, and positive leisure
experiences. Upon completion of this activity the client will know what
mindfulness is and how to use it to cope, deal with stress, not act on
impulse, and how it can enhance their day-to-day life. Client will also
learn how important mindfulness is in leisure pursuits, and how the
practice will help prepare them for fly fishing.
SUPPLIES NEEDED:
How to Practice Mindfulness Meditation packet, 1 per client (see
attached)
Pens or pencils for taking notes
Yoga mats or blankets for those who want to sit on floor
TV Screen, or monitor, or projector screen connected to a laptop
with internet connection.
Link to video ready to go:
http://www.rockhousemotion.com/project/a-deliberate-life-filmtrailer/
Timer (one that is silent)
INTERVENTION DESCRIPTION:
Opening:
Begin by reviewing group rules, addressing any concerns of the
group, and introduce any new members.
Introduce overview of group activity:
o We will talk about mindfulness and what it is.

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 1 Mindfulness
o Discussion on the importance of mindfulness in fly fishing.
o Watch a short video
o Processing discussion on the importance of mindfulness in
recovery and life.
o We will practice mindfulness by doing a mindful meditation
for 15 minutes.
o Group will end after a short discussion about the
meditation experience.
Body:
Introduce mindfulness
o Mindfulness is about being fully aware of whatever is
happening in the present moment, without filters or the
lens of judgment. It can be brought to any situation. Put
simply, mindfulness consists of cultivating awareness of
the mind and body and living in the here and now. While
mindfulness as a practice is historically rooted in ancient
Buddhist meditative disciplines, its also a universal
practice that anyone can benefit from. Mindfulness is a
way of learning how to relate directly to your life. Because
its about your life, no one else can do it for you or tell you
exactly how to do it. Fortunately, it isnt something you
have to get or acquire. You already have it within you; its
simply a matter of being present. In fact, in the very
moment you recognize you arent present, you become
present. The moment you see that youve been trapped by
your thoughts, you gain the freedom to step out of the
trap. Mindfulness is a way of life that can be practiced in
two ways: formally and informally. Formal practice means
taking time out each day to intentionally sit, stand, or lie
down and focus on the breath, bodily sensations, sounds,
other senses, or thoughts and emotions. Informal practice
involves bringing mindful awareness to daily, such as
eating, exercise, chores, relating to others, and basically
any action, whether at work, at home, or anywhere else
you find yourself.
Open up for questions about what mindfulness is.
Explain how important it is to be mindful when fly fishing.
o Be calm and focused while casting, dont get frustrated.
Frustration will lead to a bad day fishing.
o The fish are eating the bugs and insects that are flying
around or are in/on the water, be observant.
o The water will be fast and cold, the rocks underneath will

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 1 Mindfulness
be slippery, be cautious and focused.
o The wind will blow your fly and fly line, observe the breeze
on your skin, which direction is it going? You will adjust
your cast accordingly.
o Listen, birds chirping overhead? The fish are listening and
will be timid to avoid being eaten.
o Listen, do you hear fish jumping? Or are they quietly
feeding underneath the surface of the water?
o Move quietly and slowly to your fishing spot, dont spook
the fish.
o Once you have casted, all you intention goes to the fly and
the fish underneath. If you get distracted for one second,
you will miss the bite.
o Always check yourself for mindfulness. A distracted angler
will never be as successful as a mindful one.
Introduce A Deliberate Life videoread video introduction written
by the producers:
o There comes a time in all of our lives when we let
ourselves dream about living life on our own terms. When
we wrestle with the decision to take a step into traffic,
follow our passions and live deliberately or simply let
another day, and daydream, pass.
In the end, it doesnt matter if we make the decision of our
own accord, or life makes it for us. Its where our heart
and soul are that matter. For some, the result is a closer
alignment between vocation and avocation, for some its a
reprioritization of whats important in life, for some its the
very real difference between life and death.
Watch video (3 minutes):
http://www.rockhousemotion.com/project/a-deliberate-life-filmtrailer/
Process concept of mindfulness, the video, fly fishing and
recovery now (see discussion questions below).
Conclusion:
Have everyone get comfortable.
Suggest a comfortable position on the chair, sitting on the floor,
lying on the floor.
Make the mats and blankets available.
Dim some lights, not all.
Set the timer for 15 minutes
Have the group close their eyes if they are comfortable doing so.
Use the script below:

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 1 Mindfulness
o Take a few moments to be still. Congratulate yourself for
taking some time for meditation practice."
-Pause for a few secondsBring your awareness to your breath wherever you feel it
most prominently in your body. It may be at the nose,
neck, chest, belly, or somewhere else. As you breathe in
normally and naturally, be aware of breathing in, and as
you breathe out, be aware of breathing out. Simply
maintain this awareness of the breath, breathing in and
breathing out.
-Pause for a minuteThere is no need to visualize, count, or figure out the
breath; just be mindful of breathing in and out. Without
judgment, just watch the breath ebb and flow like waves in
the sea. Theres no place to go and nothing else to do, just
be in the here and now, noticing the breath just living
life one inhalation and one exhalation at a time.
-Pause for one minuteAs you breathe in and out, be mindful of the breath rising
on the inhalation and falling on the exhalation. Just riding
the waves of the breath, moment by moment, breathing in
and breathing out.
-Pause for one minuteFrom time to time, attention may wander from the
breath. When you notice this, simply acknowledge where
you went and then gently bring your attention back to the
breath.
-Pause for two minutesBreathing normally and naturally, without manipulating
the breath in any way, just be aware of the breath as it
comes and goes.

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 1 Mindfulness
-Pause until 15 minutes has passed-

As you come to the end of the meditation, congratulate


yourself for taking this time to be present, realizing that
this is an act of love. May we be at peace. May all beings
be at peace.
Thank the group for their participation.
Suggest they journal about their experience today when they get
a quiet moment back at their room.
Clean up mats and blankets.
Pass out How to Practice Mindfulness Meditation handout
before they leave.

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS: Some individuals may be


uncomfortable in a dark room with their eyes closed, for example,
individuals who have experienced trauma. Be cognizant of this, and
dont force them to close their eyes, lie down, etc. Keep the room
dimly lit.
POSSIBLE DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
Remembering:
What have we discussed so far?
Understanding:
What is mindfulness?
What does it mean to be present?
Applying:
What does mindfulness look like when fly fishing?
Can mindfulness be used in other leisure activities? Examples
Can mindfulness be used in ordinary mundane tasks?
Analyzing:
What does mindfulness look like compared to mindlessness?
Examples
What steps are necessary to take to be mindful?
What does it mean to be deliberate?
Evaluating:
What is the relationship between being deliberate and mindful?
Do you think mindfulness would be beneficial in your own life?
What is the relationship between mindfulness and impulse
control?
What is the relationship between mindfulness and coping with
difficult situations
Creating:
How would you incorporate mindfulness in your recovery?

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 1 Mindfulness

What barriers do you foresee in practicing mindfulness, and what


strategies can you use to overcome those barriers?
How can you use mindfulness to live a deliberate life?

POSSIBLE GROUP OR INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENTS: Have the


clients practice mindful meditation individually once a day and journal
about the experience daily.
MODIFICATIONS OR ADAPTIONS:
Processing is done before the meditation to allow the individual
to do self-reflection on the exercise on his or her own. But,
processing could be done after the meditation as well.
There are numerous audio recordings available that guide
mindfulness meditations. These could be used instead of the
facilitator reading the meditation script.
SOURCE:
Murphy, C., & Mackillop, J. (2011). Living in the here and now:
Interrelationships between impulsivity, mindfulness, and alcohol
misuse. Psychopharmacology, 527-536. Retrieved October 26, 2014.
Stahl, B., & Goldstein, E. (2010). A mindfulness-based stress reduction
workbook. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications.

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 2 Developing Resources
HOLDING AREAS ART COLLAGE
Creative Intervention
POPULATION: Inpatient Substance Abuse
AGE: Adult
GROUP SIZE: 1-16
SETTING CONSIDERATIONS: Classroom with tables and chairs.
PREPARATION CONSIDERATIONS: This group activity (like most of
the group activities in the fly fishing program) requires that the
facilitator has enough experience and knowledge of fly fishing to teach
a beginning group the skills necessary to fly fish. If the recreation
therapist does not have the ability to do this or, needs additional
resources, other options to help facilitation would be:
Arranging a third party facilitator for the fly fishing related
educational component of this group.
Utilizing internet based resources such as videos to teach the fly
fishing related educational component of this group. One
recommended source is: http://howtoflyfish.orvis.com/videolessons.
GROUP STAGE CONSIDERATIONS: Forming, Storming, Norming,
Performing
PURPOSE/GOALS: This intervention addresses coping skills, creating
positive leisure experience and helps to identify individual strengths
and resources. Upon completion of this activity, client will be able to
identify personal strengths and resources they can draw upon in
recovery. Client will also learn about basic trout behaviors, holding
areas in rivers, and feeding patterns. This will be used as an analogy
to our own individual behaviors, resiliency, strengths, and resources.
SUPPLIES NEEDED:
Large monitor, or TV screen connected to a laptop
Go to http://howtoflyfish.orvis.com/video-lessons/chapter-eightreading-water. You will use videos 1-8, (approx 12 minutes
total).
Printed images of trout holding areas to help the client visualize

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 2 Developing Resources

concepts (see attached) 1 per client


Reading The Water handout
Stack of magazines, at least one per client
Scissors
Glue glue sticks, or craft glue, 1 per client
Scotch tape, several rolls
Cardstock
Markers

INTERVENTION DESCRIPTION:
Opening (10 minutes):
Begin by reviewing group rules, addressing any concerns of the
group, and introducing new members to the group.
Introduce overview of group activity:
o First we will learn about basic trout behaviors, holding
areas in rivers, and feeding patterns.
o We will watch a short series of videos and have a brief
discussion about strategies trout use to get food, how to
maximize their energy reserves, and how they avoid
predators.
o We will then create a personal art collage that represents
your own strategy for life during/after treatment. For
example: who is your support system, hobbies and leisure
activities, your own personal strengths that you can build
on.
Body (60 minutes):
Where trout hang out and where they feed is referred to trout
holding areas or patterns.
There are numerous factors that influence where a trout hangs
out: presence of predators, speed of the current, availability of
nutrients, depth of the water, amount of cover or shade, etc.
Fly fisherman dont use fish finders, so knowing fish behavior
and holding patterns is key to catching fish.
The ability to look at a river and identify where fish are found is
called reading the water.
Watch the videos 1-8 at: http://howtoflyfish.orvis.com/videolessons/chapter-eight-reading-water
Begin processing discussion, see questions below.
Playing off of the final discussion questions below, introduce the
art collage.
Have each member design their own Holding Area using
images cut out of the magazines.

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 2 Developing Resources
Encourage creativity and that there is no wrong way to complete
the collage.
Emphasize that they look for images that represent their
strengths and resources.
Conclusion (15 minutes)
Have group wrap-up and clean up classroom and put away
supplies.
Ask the group if anyone wants to share his or her collage with
the group.
Thank everyone for participation and sharing.
Remind them that what happens in group stays in group.
Pass out the Reading the Water handout for individual study to
prepare for fly fishing excursion.

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS: Working with glue can be frustrating


for some individuals and thus distracting from the activity. Make tape
available and be alert for individuals getting frustrated.
POSSIBLE DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
Remembering:
What are some of the key things the video discussed about trout
behavior?
Where do trout feed?
How do trout stay safe from predators?
Understanding:
What are some things about trout that you learned that you
didnt know before?
Applying:
What would you look for or be aware of when first approaching a
river?
What are some things to consider when fishing a really large
deep river with a fast current?
Evaluating:
Trout almost always face upstream, how do you suppose they do
that without tiring?
What strategies or resources do you use that help you face
challenges and swim upstream so to speak?
Creating:
(Hold up the Trout Holding Areas handout) What would your own
holding areas look like? What objects/values/activities would you
surround yourself with to stay safe from relapse?
When you are just hanging out, what sort of

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 2 Developing Resources

objects/values/activities would you surround yourself with?


Think about the resources you have, church, family, friends,
determination, hobbies, etc. What resources support you.

POSSIBLE GROUP OR INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENTS: Have the


clients further explore their identified strengths on their collage
through journaling during down time. Have them select one strength
or resource a day to write about.
MODIFICATIONS OR ADAPTIONS: For clients on self-harm or
suicide restrictions, scissors can be replaced by tearing out the
pictures.
RESOURCE:
http://howtoflyfish.orvis.com/video-lessons/chapter-eight-readingwater
SOURCE:
Reading the Water. (n.d.). Retrieved February 11, 2015, from
http://midcurrent.com/techniques/reading-the-water/
Trout holding image from:
http://neophyteflyfishingbasics.com/?page_id=670

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 3 - Resiliency
KNOT FRUSTRATED
Challenge Intervention
POPULATION: Inpatient Substance Abuse
AGE: Adult
GROUP SIZE: 4-16
SETTING CONSIDERATIONS: Gym, or outside on the grass
PREPARATION CONSIDERATIONS: This group activity (like most of
the group activities in the fly fishing program) requires that the
facilitator has enough experience and knowledge of fly fishing to teach
a beginning group the skills necessary to fly fish. If the recreation
therapist does not have the ability to do this or, needs additional
resources, other options to help facilitation would be:
Arranging a third party facilitator for the fly fishing related
educational component of this group.
Utilizing internet based resources such as videos to teach the fly
fishing related educational component of this group. One
recommended source is: http://howtoflyfish.orvis.com/videolessons.
GROUP STAGE CONSIDERATIONS: Forming, Storming, Norming,
Performing. Because this activity involves group collaboration, extra
time should be taken to make introductions and start with an
icebreaker if your group is in the forming stage.
PURPOSE/GOALS: This intervention addresses client problems
related to coping skills and impulse control. Upon completion of this
activity client will be able to identify ways to move forward despite
adversity and challenge. Client will also learn how to tie two basic
knots in fly fishing. Includes group activity in which all group members
will tie one large knot, with one long rope.
SUPPLIES NEEDED:
Knot handout (see attached), 1 per client
100 feet of rope
3 feet of yarn or small rope to demonstrate knot to group, and 1
section per client for individual practice
Carabiner clips (used as the hook for knot demonstration), and
1 per client for individual practice
Fishing line, (3) 18 inch sections per client
Fishing streamers, one per client

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 3 - Resiliency
INTERVENTION DESCRIPTION:
Opening (10 minutes):
Begin by reviewing group rules, addressing any concerns of the
group, and introducing new members to the group.
Introduce overview of group activity:
o Today we are going to learn how to tie two basic knots
used in fly fishing.
o We will practice individually tying the knots.
o We will then gather as a group and do a challenge task
related to our knots.
o End group with processing discussion.
Body (50 minutes):
Pass out knot handouts
Pass out knot tying supplies
Demonstrate how to tie the improved clinch knot using the 3 ft
rope and carabiner clip. Remember the clip acts as the eye of
hook.
Have the group try tying the improved clinch knots first using
the larger rope pieces and clip. Suggest attaching the clip to a
chair or working with a partner and taking turns holding the clip.
Have them do this until they are comfortable with the improved
clinch knot.
Now have them practice using the fishing line. After the
improved clinch knot is tied to the streamer move on to the
surgeons knot.
This knot is easier and shouldnt take much time. Have them tie
it using the remaining two sections of fishing line.
Gather up supplies, have them put away fishing handout.
Move on to the next activity the gigantic group knot.
The objective of this task is for the group to tie an improved
clinch knot with the large rope. Here are the rules:
o Lay the rope out on the ground in a straight line,
o Each individual will grab a section of rope,
o Once an individual touches the rope, they have to continue
to hold on to the rope at that point and cannot let go until
the knot is tied.
o Use a tree or another group member as the hook (the
knot will tie around the tree trunk or the waist of the group
member, similar to the function of the carabiner clip).
o Do not give any further instructions. Allow them to
problem solve and figure out how to complete the knot on
their own. They may or may not be successful.

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 3 - Resiliency
SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS:
This is intended to be challenging, and will likely be frustrating
for some clients. Be prepared to work through those feelings and
emotions during processing.
Make sure all fishing line, rope, hooks and clips are accounted
for at the end of the group. These items pose a potential safety
risk to individuals on self-harm or suicide precautions.
POSSIBLE DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
Remembering:
What did we do the first half of group?
What two knots did you learn?
Understanding:
When would you use the improved clinch knot?
When would you use the surgeons knot?
Applying:
Do you think you could tie these knots on the river when we go
fly fishing?
What can you do to be prepared to do that?
Analyzing:
What were the challenges you faced when tying the group knot?
Challenge wise, what was different between tying the group knot
and tying the individual knot?
Evaluating:
What would have made tying the group knot go easier?
What were your strongest emotions you felt during the group
exercise, how did you deal with those emotions?
How does this relate to your recovery? What about fly fishing?
Creating:
What strategies and/or resources will you use to deal with
frustrating emotions after leaving treatment?
Practicing tying knots makes you better at them, how can you
practice to become better at facing challenges and frustrations.
POSSIBLE GROUP OR INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENTS: Have each
client journal about perseverance, patience, and resiliency. Suggest
they identify specific strategies for dealing with frustration and
challenging situations.
MODIFICATIONS OR ADAPTIONS: The challenge component of this
task, if done successfully will require some participants to stoop, bend,
kneel, and be in close proximity to others. Know the limits and abilities
of your clients and adapt the exercise accordingly. For example, an
individual in a wheelchair or with limited mobility could be the anchor
to which the rope is tied around (instead of the tree).

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 3 - Resiliency
RESOURCE:
http://howtoflyfish.orvis.com/video-lessons
SOURCE:
Welcome to NETKNOTS. (n.d.). Retrieved February 11, 2015, from
http://www.netknots.com/

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 4 Change
CYCLES OF LIFE
Game-like Intervention
POPULATION: Inpatient Substance Abuse
AGE: Adult
GROUP SIZE: 1-16
SETTING CONSIDERATIONS: Classroom with tables and chairs,
and whiteboard.
PREPARATION CONSIDERATIONS: This group activity (like most of
the group activities in the fly fishing program) requires that the
facilitator has enough experience and knowledge of fly fishing to teach
a beginning group the skills necessary to fly fish. If the recreation
therapist does not have the ability to do this or, needs additional
resources, other options to help facilitation would be:
Arranging a third party facilitator for the fly fishing related
educational component of this group.
Utilizing internet based resources such as videos to teach the fly
fishing related educational component of this group. One
recommended source is: http://howtoflyfish.orvis.com/videolessons.
GROUP STAGE CONSIDERATIONS: Forming, Storming, Norming,
Performing. Because this activity involves group collaboration, extra
time should be taken to make introductions and start with an
icebreaker if your group is in the forming stage.
PURPOSE/GOALS: This intervention addresses client problems
related to coping skills. Upon completion of the group activity and
individual assignment, client will be able to identify short and long
term goals, along with values, strengths and resources to help them
facilitate the change necessary to reach those goals. The lifecycle of
the mayfly will be introduced and used as an analogy to facilitate
thought and discussion. The client will learn key points about the
mayfly that will prepare them for a fly fishing excursion.

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 4 Change
SUPPLIES NEEDED:
Medicine Wheel Template (see attached), at least 1 per client
Lifecycle of a Mayfly handout (see attached)
Various mayfly adult (dry) patterns
Various mayfly nymph (wet) patterns
Colored whiteboard markers
Whiteboard eraser
4 sided die
INTERVENTION DESCRIPTION:
Opening:
Begin by reviewing group rules, addressing any concerns of the
group, and introduce any new members.
Introduce overview of group activity:
o Learn about the lifecycle of the mayfly and how you will
use that in fly fishing.
o Discussion about the different types of flies used when fly
fishing.
o Introduce the concept of the medicine wheel.
o Group design of a medicine wheel.
o Discussion
Body:
Pass out handout of the lifecycle of a mayfly.
Explain the lifecycle of the mayfly and how that plays into a
trouts diet.
Explain dry fly fishing and nymph fishing, and when you would
use each type.
Pass around the different types of flies so that everyone in the
group gets the opportunity to examine them and note the
characteristics of the imitation fly versus the real fly on the
handout.
Advise the group to be careful handling the flies as they have a
sharp hook on the end.
Gather flies and have everyone put away the handout and any
other materials they have out that may be a distraction.
Introduce the concept of a medicine wheel.
o Just as the mayfly goes through a lifecycle, we too go
through many cycles. From birth to death, growth and
change in cycles, and the process of recovery happens in
cycles.
o Today we are going to talk about the medicine wheel.

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 4 Change
o Although MWs have been used by many cultures
throughout the world, they are often associated with
Native American tradition. The medicine wheel is a circular
structure often made of stone. Many versions of the
medicine wheel exist and the purpose of the circular wheel
differs somewhat across tribes. One Native American
spiritual teacher indicates that the MW is a healing and
connection tool to be used for the uplifting and betterment
of mankind. It has been described as the essence of Native
Americans way of life, a key to understanding the
universe; it serves as a way in which individuals achieve
wholeness. The medicine wheel provides a framework for
growth and direction in ones life. A wide variety of
medicine wheels exist, each being slightly different given
the diverse values/beliefs of a tribe.
o Most representations of the medicine wheel involve two
vertical and horizontal lines bisecting at the midpoint,
placed within a circle. The importance of the circle is
echoed throughout indigenous literature, writing, and
research: it has significant cultural and spiritual meaning
among indigenous people. Native spirituality tends to be
circular in nature. Native American healing practices are
incorporated within a holistic and circular framework: The
circle is a key symbol in Native American philosophy and is
sacred in Native American spirituality According to Black
Elk the central symbol involved in everything Native
Americans do is the circle because the world is viewed as
working in circles. For example, the sky is round; the earth
is round; birds make their nests in circles; the life of a
person is a circle composed of a cycle of life phases;
individuals and families are circles within a larger
community circle.
o The medicine wheel circle is divided into four quadrants.
The number four is very sacred to indigenous people, since
it refers to so many aspects of Native American life. The
medicine wheel is also very sacred in that it represents the
very essence of Native Americans, as a whole. The wheel
can also be considered a symbol that functions as a
metaphor for life symbolizing the developmental stage
from birth to death.
o As you can see there are many ways to label a medicine
wheel, depending on an individuals beliefs.

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 4 Change
Today we are going to work on a Medicine Wheel as a group. The
four areas within our wheel correspond to the four realms of
human existence:
Draw a medicine wheel on the whiteboard with four quadrants
labeled as below, starting in the top right and going clockwise:
(1) The Physical Realm,
(2) Knowledge and Enlightenment,
(3) The Spiritual Realm, and
(4) Introspective Thought
Each group member will get a chance to roll the die.
The group member will add an action step, value, or thought to
the medicine wheel quadrant that corresponds to the number
rolled on the die.
o For example: If the client roles a 1, an action step might
be to exercise daily
Though this is done as a group, each members contribution will
be very personal and should be respected. A brief discussion
with the client and group about what that action
step/lesson/value means to them in recovery and in life should
follow.
Continue play until everyone has had a turn to contribute to the
medicine wheel.
Conclusion:
Allow time for processing discussion at the end.
Clients will be given their own medicine wheel template to work
on individually back at their rooms.
As mentioned earlier, the medicine wheel can also be considered
a symbol that functions as a metaphor for life symbolizing the
developmental stage from birth to death.
Instruct them to develop two goals for each quadrant, and to
label their wheel starting with:
(1) Treatment Goals
(2) Immediate Goals Post-Treatment (0-12 months)
(3) Short-Term Goals (1-5 years)
(4) Long-Term Goals (5+ years)
Along with the goals, they should add action steps and values
that correspond to each quadrant.
Thank them for their contributions to group.
Remind them that what happens in group stays in group.
Pass out medicine wheel template.

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 4 Change
SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS: Because of the sacred nature of the
medicine wheel to American Indians it will be important to
acknowledge any members of the group that have ties to or belong to
any American Indian tribes by asking them to relate their own
experience and meaning of the medicine wheel.
POSSIBLE DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
Remembering:
What did we do today?
What did we discuss today?
Understanding:
What did you learn about the mayfly?
What did you learn about what trout eat?
What did you learn about the medicine wheel?
Applying:
How would you know what type of fly to use when fishing?
How will you apply your medicine wheel in your life?
Analyzing:
How does the life cycle of the mayfly relate to a medicine wheel?
How can a medicine wheel be used to improve well being and
help you in recovery?
How are the different quadrants on our medicine wheel
interconnected?
Evaluating:
How do drugs and alcohol disrupt the balance or
interconnectedness of the medicine wheel?
Are you at the center and in charge of all four aspects or do you
let your relationships and friends decide your emotional well
being?
Creating:
What is another way you could label your medicine wheel?
There are other aquatic bugs and insects that trout eat, do you
suppose that they follow a similar lifecycle?
POSSIBLE GROUP OR INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENTS: The clients
will leave group with a medicine wheel to complete individually. (See
conclusion notes above)
MODIFICATIONS OR ADAPTIONS: The medicine wheel can be
designed other ways. The way discussed focuses on domains (though
not explicitly). To simplify it, label: Physical, Mental, Emotional, and
Spiritual. A popular method in recovery programs is to add steps

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 4 Change
similar to those in AA that correlate to each quadrant/domain. See
resources below.
RESOURCES:
Orvis Website has numerous videos on beginning fly fishing.
http://howtoflyfish.orvis.com/video-lessons
http://www.wsc.edu/counseling_center/alcohol/recovery_medici
ne_wheel/
SOURCE:
Collected Essays on Learning and Teaching. (n.d.). Retrieved February
10, 2015, from
http://celt.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/CELT/article/view/3183/2
555

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 5 - Positivity
CASTING FOR POSITIVITY
Physical Intervention
POPULATION: Inpatient Substance Abuse
AGE: Adult
GROUP SIZE: 1-16
SETTING CONSIDERATIONS: Outside on the lawn. Need at least
100 feet of unobstructed distance to practice casting.
PREPARATION CONSIDERATIONS: This group activity (like most of
the group activities in the fly fishing program) requires that the
facilitator has enough experience and knowledge of fly fishing to teach
a beginning group the skills necessary to fly fish. If the recreation
therapist does not have the ability to do this or, needs additional
resources, other options to help facilitation would be:
Arranging a third party facilitator for the fly fishing related
educational component of this group. Because casting is a
critical component to fly fishing, this is the ideal scenario
unless the recreation therapist is absolutely confident in
his/her ability to teach fly casting and has experience
doing so.
Utilizing internet based resources such as videos to teach the fly
fishing related educational component of this group. One
recommended source is: http://howtoflyfish.orvis.com/videolessons.
GROUP STAGE CONSIDERATIONS: Forming, Storming, Norming,
Performing
PURPOSE/GOALS: This intervention addresses client problems
related to coping and impulse control. Upon completion of this activity
the client will be able to discuss how remaining positive, practicing
patience and being deliberate in their actions affects their recovery.
They will also be able to discuss the role of impulse control in their
daily lives and strategies for managing impulses. Client will also learn
casting skills and technique necessary for fly fishing.

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 5 - Positivity
SUPPLIES NEEDED:
1 complete fly rod set up for each client with piece of yarn tied
at the end.
(2) 100 ft sections of rope, laid out on the grass in the middle of
the 100 ft designated casting area, parallel to each other, with
30 ft of distance between the two.
INTERVENTION DESCRIPTION:
Opening (5 minutes):
Begin by reviewing group rules, addressing any concerns of the
group, and introducing new members to the group.
Introduce fly-casting instructor if applicable.
Introduce overview of group activity:
o Show the group a fly rod and go over the different parts
and terminology.
o Discussion on how fly rods work versus other fishing
outfits.
o Discussion on types of casts.
o Watch demonstration
o Practice
o Group processing and discussion
Body (60 minutes):
To be facilitated by fly-casting instructor if applicable.
Go over the different parts of the fly rod and the terminology.
Explain how fly rods work versus other fishing outfits.
Instruction on how to hold the rod.
Instruction on how to cast and the types of casts.
Casting demonstration by the instructor.
Pass out rods and begin practice.
Clients will line up on the first rope facing the direction of the
other rope and cast towards the other rope.
Thank the casting instructor and have the group show their
appreciation by clapping.
Gather up all rods and put them in safe place.
Conclusion (20 minutes):
Circle up the group for processing and discussion.
Begin processing questions.
Thank everyone their patience, sharing and participation.
Remind the group that what happens in group stays in group.
Clean up
SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS:
Fly rods are expensive and break easily, dont leave them lying
on the ground, have an established place to set the fly rods safe

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 5 - Positivity

from accidental harm or damage.


Though there will be no hook on the end of the line, it is still
possible to injury someone with flying line and with the rod tip.
Emphasize safety and keeping the rod tip up when not casting.
Do not allow clients to engage in horseplay while practicing
casting.

POSSIBLE DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:


Remembering:
What did we first do today?
What did you learn about casting?
Understanding:
What are some of the techniques to help you be a better caster?
Where do you pause when casting?
What happens when you dont pause?
Applying:
When casting on a river what are some other things to consider?
Analyzing:
What were some of the challenges you faced while practicing
casting?
Did you come up with any tricks, or strategies to make it easier?
Evaluating:
What happens to our confidence and self-esteem when we
become negative?
Were any of you feeling really negative during practice? If so,
how did that affect your casting?
Do you think being positive makes a difference and why or why
not?
Creating:
How can you relate learning to cast to your recovery? To your
treatment? To life in general?
Have any of you had other situations in your life that resulted in
negativity and frustration, which you were able to overcome or
cope with by simply being positive?
POSSIBLE GROUP OR INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENTS: Suggest that
clients consciously be aware of their actions and thoughts, and try to
identify moment when they act with impulse and without pause.
Have them journal about those moments and identify alternative ways
in which they could have acted and identify how the outcomes might
have been different. For example, blurting out an off-topic comment
during group, what were the consequences of that, why did they do
it, what should they have done different, and what would have
happened if they didnt act impulsively.

Fly-Fishing Program
Week 5 - Positivity

MODIFICATIONS OR ADAPTIONS: It is possible to cast while sitting


down, make this modification for individuals with physical disability as
appropriate.
RESOURCE:
http://howtoflyfish.orvis.com/video-lessons

RISK MANAGEMENT:
Appropriate waivers must be signed upon admission for inherent
risks that may be involved in recreational activities, including a
waiver for travel in facility van.
For off-site travel, driver of van must have current drivers
license with a clean driving record.
Current CPR and First Aid certification is required by all staff
members.
EXPECTED OUTCOMES:
Demonstration of increased psychological resources, identified
by the therapist during process groups and individual sessions.
Client will describe mindfulness and how to apply mindfulness in
daily activities.
Client will identify impulsive behaviors and describe how to use
mindfulness to mitigate negative consequences of acting
impulsively.
Client will identify and demonstrate knowledge of at least three
techniques for coping with stress.
STAFF TRAINING & CERTIFICATION:
Program will be administered by a Recreational Therapist who
has appropriate and current state licensure (TRS or MTRS) and
NCTRC certification (CTRS).
Recreational Therapist will also be required to take an
introductory fly-fishing instruction class that addresses: flyfishing gear, casting, knot tying, basic fly-fishing entomology,
dry fly fishing and nymph fly fishing, and fish habitat and
behavior. This class must include instruction on the water. Or,
Recreational Therapist must be self-described as knowledgeable
and having the appropriate skill set (knowledge of fly-fishing
gear, casting, knot tying, basic fly-fishing entomology, dry fly
fishing and nymph fly fishing, and fish habitat and behavior) to
administer the program.
PROGRAM EVALUATION:
Improved score on an impulsivity questionnaire (administered at
assessment and conclusion of program).
Improved score on a mindfulness questionnaire (administered at
assessment and conclusion of program).
Client interviews will be conducted at the completion of the
program that will identify attitudes, perceptions, and overall
satisfaction with the program.

REFERENCE:
Murphy, C., & Mackillop, J. (2011). Living in the here and now:
Interrelationships between impulsivity, mindfulness, and alcohol
misuse. Psychopharmacology, 527-536. Retrieved October 26, 2014.

H. Leishman, TRS, CTRS


(Student)
February 11, 2015