vegetarian

recipes
from my
parisian
kitchen

Clotilde Dusoulier
of chocol ate andzucchini.com

Pur
chas
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T
HEF
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COOKBOOK
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CLARKSON POTTER

Copyright © 2013 by Clotilde Dusoulier
Recipe photographs copyright © 2013 by Françoise Nicol
Paris and market photographs copyright © 2013 by
Emilie Guelpa
All rights reserved.
Published in the United States by Clarkson Potter/
Publishers, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a
division of Random House, Inc., New York.
www.crownpublishing.com
www.clarksonpotter.com
CLARKSON POTTER is a trademark and POTTER
with colophon is a registered trademark of Random
House, Inc.
Library of Congress Cataloging-­in-­Publication Data is
available upon request.
ISBN 978-­0-­307-­98482-­1
eISBN 978-­0-­307-­98483-­8
Printed in China
Book and cover design by Rae Ann Spitzenberger
Front cover photography © Maridav (background) and
ingwervanille (food)
Food styling by Virginie Michelin
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
First Edition

For Milan,
who came along
for the ride

Contents
ABOUT THIS BOOK 9

SPRING
SUMMER
FALL
WINTER
Essentials
page 15

page 59

page 105

page 149

page 197

AC K N O W L E D G M E N T S 2 1 9
RECIPE INDEX 220
INDEX 222

seduced by vegetables 7

SPRING
Le printemps

As tender greens and waxy pods pile up on market stalls,
all I want to do is prop my basket open and let young and
sprightly things tumble in. Spring is the season of effortless inspiration in the kitchen.
But spring in Paris comes in fits and starts, the weather
alternating between golden days and chilly dips. And so
my spring repertoire offers the kind of bright dishes I crave
on promisingly sunny days, when it feels like winter has
truly departed, and also comforting ones to lean into when
it turns out the season’s influence lingers still.
Regardless of where my recipes fall in this dichotomy,
they’re a celebration of the produce of spring, from
the pop of pea pods to the snap of asparagus—­and the
uncontainable excitement their appearance brings.

produce to play with in the spring
• Artichokes

• Fava beans

• Mâche

• Radishes

• Strawberries

• Asparagus

• Garlic

• Morels

• Rhubarb

• Swiss chard

• Beets

• Green peas

• Turnips

• Kohlrabi

• New
potatoes

• Scallions

• Carrots

• Sorrel

• Watercress

• Dandelions

• Lettuce

• Onions

• Spinach

AVOCADO AND RADISH
MINI-­TARTINES
Mini-­tartines radis et avocat

The classic French way of eating radishes, and the way I’ve
eaten them since childhood, is as an hors d’oeuvre: You trim
the radishes, leaving a short tuft of stem as a little handle to
pick them up, and serve them with chilled salted butter and
fresh baguette.
The combination of radish, butter, salt, and bread seems
like it can’t be improved upon, except perhaps if you replace the
butter with avocado, which I think of as vegetable butter. For
these quick mini-­tartines, I season the avocado with lemon juice,
cumin, and salt, mash it onto slim slices of baguette, and scatter
paper-­thin slices of pink radishes on top, like oversized confetti.
Bright in color and flavor, they’re a favorite spring nibble to
accompany an early evening drink at my house.

S E RV E S 4 T O 6

2 avocados (each
about 7 ounces /
200 g)
4 teaspoons
freshly squeezed
lemon juice
1 teaspoon
ground cumin
½ teaspoon fine
sea salt, plus
more for sprinkling
Freshly ground
black pepper
Hot sauce (optional)
1 slim baguette
A bunch or two of
small pink or red
radishes (about
24 small), trimmed

1. Scoop the avocado flesh into a bowl. Add the lemon
juice, cumin, and salt and season with pepper and
hot sauce (if using). Mash the avocado roughly to
get a slightly chunky texture. Taste and adjust the
seasoning; it should be so zesty you have to resist
eating the whole bowl with a spoon.
2. Slice the baguette at an angle into ½-­inch / 1 cm slices
and spread the slices with the mashed avocado.
3. Using a mandoline slicer or very sharp knife, slice the
radishes crosswise into paper-­thin rounds. Scatter on
top of the avocado, sprinkle with a touch more salt,
and serve.

spring

• le printemps 17

S E RV E S 4

1 pound / 450 g
green asparagus
Fine sea salt
11⁄3 cups / 200 g
shelled green peas,
fresh or frozen
12 large romaine
lettuce leaves
1 tablespoon cold-­
pressed hazelnut
oil or untoasted
sesame oil
1 tablespoon
neutral-­tasting oil,
such as grapeseed
or safflower
1 tablespoon
freshly squeezed
lemon juice
Freshly ground
black pepper
1 cup / 20 g chopped
fresh chervil or
cilantro leaves
½ recipe Blanch-­
Roasted New
Potatoes (page 23),
slightly warm
½ cup / 60 g
hazelnuts, toasted
(see page 68) and
roughly chopped

VERY GREEN SALAD
Salade toute verte

Spring is the season I most closely associate with the color
green—­and the irresistible craving for it on my plate. I am
especially fond of combining different shades of green in salads
such as this one: the baby green of a romaine lettuce, the peppy
green of fresh peas, and the darker emerald of asparagus, all
punctuated by bright flecks of leafy herbs.
The only exception to the color scheme here is the addition
of hazelnuts, which bring a welcome toasty crunch, and roasted
new potatoes, which turn this salad into a full meal.
The naming of the salad is a nostalgic nod to Le Délicabar,
the much-­missed restaurant once housed in Le Bon Marché, a
department store in Paris, which offered an array of color-­themed
salads on its menu: salade toute violette, salade toute orange, and
salade toute blanche, among other vegetable-­focused dishes.

1. Trim the bottom of the asparagus stalks, just to
remove the woody part. Cut the stalks at an angle into
½-­inch / 1 cm slices, leaving the tips whole.
2. Set up a steamer. Sprinkle the asparagus with salt
and steam, tightly covered, until cooked through but
still with a little bite, 4 to 5 minutes. Set aside to cool.
Steam the peas in the same fashion.
3. Cut the leaves of lettuce in half along their central
spine, then cut at an angle into ½-­inch / 1 cm strips.
You should get about 8 cups, loosely packed.
4. In a large salad bowl, whisk together both oils, the
lemon juice, and ½ teaspoon salt.

18 the french market cookbook

5. Just before serving, add the lettuce to the dressing,
sprinkle with pepper, and toss to coat. Fold in the
asparagus, peas, chervil, and warm potatoes.
6. Divide among 4 salad bowls, sprinkle with the
hazelnuts, and serve.

spring

• le printemps 19

SHOCKING PINK PASTA
Pâtes rose vif

For this unusual and remarkably quick pasta dish, you simply
blend raw beets together with cream, garlic, and a touch of
cumin. This produces a shocking pink sauce that is perfect for
tossing with cooked pasta—­preferably long strands, such as
spaghetti or bucatini—­and crowning with fresh parsley and
chopped almonds. If you want to push it up a notch in terms
of sophistication, roast baby beets and cut them in quarters to
garnish the pasta.

1. In a food processor or blender, combine the beets,
cream, garlic, salt, and cumin. Process until smooth.
2. Bring salted water to a boil in a large pot. Add the
pasta and cook until it’s a minute shy of al dente.
Drain, return the pasta to the pot, and fold in the
sauce. Return to medium heat and cook until heated
through and al dente, about 1 minute.
3. Divide among warm bowls, sprinkle with pepper, and
top with the parsley and almonds. Serve immediately.

S E RV E S 4

12 ounces / 340 g
beets, peeled
and diced
1 cup / 240 ml light
whipping cream
or unsweetened
nondairy cream
alternative, such
as soy or rice
1 garlic clove
1 teaspoon
fine sea salt
1 teaspoon whole
cumin seeds or
½ teaspoon ground
cumin
1 pound / 450 g long
pasta, such as
spaghetti, bucatini,
or linguine
Freshly ground
black pepper
1 cup / 20 g chopped
fresh flat-­leaf parsley
leaves
2⁄3 cup / 85 g
almonds, toasted
(see page 68) and
roughly chopped

PREHEATING PASTA BOWLS

To prevent pasta from cooling too quickly after serving, preheat
the serving bowls or plates: a few minutes before your pasta is
cooked, scoop a few tablespoons of the boiling pasta water into
each bowl and set aside. Pour out the water just before serving;
there’s no need to dry the bowls.

fall

• l ’ automne 115

Pur
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T
HEF
RENCH
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COOKBOOK
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CLARKSON POTTER

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