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Mostly sunny

today and
mostly clear
tonight. Highs
in the upper 60s and lows in
the lower 50s. See page 2.
Monday, October 14, 2013
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50 daily Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869
Gravity eclipses Phillips at box
office, p4

Soccer tournament action,
p6-7
Upfront
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Announcements 4
Community 5
Sports 6-8
Classifieds 9
TV 10
World News 11
Index
www.delphosherald.com
Supporters bash car for FFA
FFA supporters could bash a car with a sledge hammer or give it a new paint
job for a donation Saturday afternoon. Above: Don Wallen gives the hood of the
car donated by a local junk yard a good whack. The effort raised more than $200
for the chapter. (Delphos Herald/Nancy Spencer)
Sheriff collecting unwanted,
unused prescription drugs
Information submitted
Each day, approximately 2,500 teens use prescription drugs
to get high for the first time, according to the Partnership for
a Drug Free America. Studies show that a majority of the
abused drugs are obtained from family and friends, including
the home medicine cabinet.
In an effort to address this problem, the Van Wert County
Sheriffs Office, in conjunction with the DEA, state and local
law enforcement agencies throughout the United States, will
conduct the seventh National Prescription Drug Take Back
Day on Oct. 26.
The purpose of this National Take Back Day is to provide
a venue for persons who want to dispose of unwanted and
unused prescription drugs.
This initiative addresses vital safety and public health issues.
Last April, Americans turned in 371 tons (over 742,000 pounds)
of prescription drugs at over 5,800 sites operated by the DEA and
its thousands of state and local law enforcement partners. In its six
previous Take Back events, DEA and its partners took in over 2.8
million poundsmore than 1,400 tonsof pills.
There were approximately 5,829 state and local law
enforcement agencies throughout the nation that participated
in the event. All told the American Public has turned in more
than 2,800,678 pounds (1,409 tons) of prescription drugs in the
six National Take Back Days.
This effort has been a huge success in removing potentially
dangerous prescription drugs, particularly controlled substanc-
es, from our nations medicine cabinets.
The Van Wert County Sheriffs Office will accept prescrip-
tion medication at 113 N. Market St. in Van Wert. Prescription
drugs can be dropped off to the Communications Officer in the
lobby of the Sheriffs Office.
zombies invade delphos
More than 60 zombies gathered in Delphos to search for food (brains) on Sunday. A donation of canned goods
for humans got a zombie in the event and all proceeds from a 50-50 drawing and various raffles to benefit the
Delphos Interfaith Thrift Shop. Zombies enjoyed a Zombie Market and made a short video before lurching down
Main Street to Brentilys Steak House for the Zombie After Party. Above: John Langan and Rosanna and Cassady
Bockrath put on their best zombie faces and joined in the fun. (Delphos Herald/Nancy Spencer)
Spending is
stumbling block
to budget deal
BY DONNA CASSATA
WASHINGTON (AP)
Senate Republicans and
Democrats hit an impasse
Sunday over spending in their
last-ditch struggle to avoid an
economy-jarring default in just
four days and end a partial gov-
ernment shutdown thats enter-
ing its third week.
After inconclusive talks
between President Barack
Obama and House Republicans,
Senate Majority Leader Harry
Reid, D-Nev., and Minority
Leader Mitch McConnell,
R-Ky., took charge in trying
to end the crises, although a
conversation Sunday afternoon
failed to break the stalemate.
Im optimistic about the
prospects for a positive conclu-
sion to the issues before this
country today, Reid said as
the Senate wrapped up a rare
Sunday session.
The two cagy negotiators are
at loggerheads over Democratic
demands to undo or change
the automatic, across-the-board
spending cuts to domestic and
defense programs that the GOP
see as crucial to reducing the
nations deficit.
McConnell insisted a solu-
tion was readily available in
the proposal from a bipartisan
group of 12 senators, led by
Sens. Susan Collins, R-Maine,
and Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., that
would re-open the government
and fund it at current levels for
six months while raising the
debt limit through Jan. 31.
Its time for Democrat lead-
ers to take yes for an answer,
McConnell said in a statement.
But six Democrats in the
group and a spokesman for
Collins said that while nego-
tiations continued this weekend,
there was no agreement.
The latest snag comes as
350,000 federal workers remain
idle, hundreds of thousands
more work without pay and an
array of government services,
from home loan applications
to environmental inspections,
were on hold on the 13th day of
the shutdown.
See TAKE BACK, page 11
Jefferson FCCLA is sell-
ing Otis Spunkmeyer food
products through Oct. 25.
All products are $16.
Proceeds will benefit FCCLA
and 50 percent will be
donated to the American
Cancer Society. Last year,
FCCLA donated $500 to
cancer research with the
communitys support.
The following prod-
ucts are available: cookie
dough chocolate chip,
triple chocolate chunk, white
chocolate macadamia nut,
peanut butter, carnival, butter
sugar, snickerdoodle, mint
chocolate chunk, oatmeal
raisin, strawberry short-
cake, cranberry oatmeal and
reduced fat chocolate chip.
Other products: Auntie
Annes pretzels, double
chocolate chip brownies,
bake-up brownie rounds,
chocolate-filled croissants,
apple cinnamon coffee cake
and raspberry danish twists.
Contact a Jefferson Middle
School seventh- or eighth-
grade FCCLA member or
advisor Bev Tuttle at btut-
tle@delphoscityschools.org.
FCCLA selling
food products
Delphos Fire and Rescue tackles storage building fire
Delphos Fire and
Rescue were called to a
building fire behind 516
Carolyn Drive at 1:15 p.m.
Saturday. Firefighters
arrived on scene at 1:16
p.m. and quickly brought
the fire under control
and extinguished it. After
investigation, the fire
appeared to have started
in the area of a cabinet
with an electrical junc-
tion box attached under-
neath. Fire damage was
minor; smoke and heat
damages were heavy. The
exact cause remains unde-
termined. The depart-
ment responded with two
engines staffed by full-
time firefighters and 16
part-paid firefighters.
One EMS squad with
three part-paid EMTs
also responded. They
were on scene for approx-
imately 45 minutes and
back on station at 2:30
p.m. (Delphos Herald/
Nancy Spencer)
Finance meeting
set today
The chairman and vice
chairman of the Delphos City
Council Finance Committee
have called for a public
meeting at 7 p.m. today.
The meeting will be
held at the municipal build-
ing, 608 N. Canal St.
See BUDGET, page 11
2 The Herald Monday, October 14, 2013
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
FUNERALS
BIRTHS
LOTTERY
WEATHER
FROM THE ARCHIVES
POLICE REPORT
The Delphos Herald wants
to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the news-
room of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.
CorreCtions
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 143 No. 87
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager,
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Lori Goodwin Silette,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
The Delphos Herald is deliv-
ered by carrier in Delphos for
$1.48 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office
for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.

405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
At approximately
11:20 p.m. Saturday,
Delphos Police were
contacted by a con-
cerned citizen who
advised that there
was a subject inside
a business in the 100
block of East Second
Street who had threat-
ened another person
and had a firearm in
his possession at that
time but had went to a
nearby motor vehicle and had placed the
firearm inside.
The vehicle was checked by officers
at which time they did observe in plain
view a handgun lying on the front seat
of the vehicle. A second firearm was also
later located inside the vehicle.
Officers then went to the business
and located the subject involved. Upon
speaking with him, officers found enough
probable cause to cite Michael Ruce
OCallaghan Jr., 35, of Van Wert on the
charges of operating a motor vehicle
while having his driving privileges sus-
pended and for mishandling a firearm in
a motor vehicle.
OCallaghan was cited into Lima
Municipal Court on
the charges; addi-
tional charges are
pending upon review
of the case by the
Prosecutors Office.
At 7:06 p. m.
Friday, police went
to 708 East Third
Street to serve an
active arrest warrant
on a subject staying at
that location.
Upon offi cers
arrival, they located Andrew Stocklin,
28, of Delphos and took him into cus-
tody on an warrant issued out of Lima
Municipal Court on a failure to appear on
a prior theft charge.
Stocklin was later turned over to depu-
ties from the Allen County Sheriff s
Department.
At 9:38 a.m. Friday, police were called
to a business in the 1000 block of Elida
Avenue in reference to a theft complaint
at the business.
Upon officers arrival, they met with
store employees, who stated that a
female and male subjects had been in the
store for an extended time. Employees
observed the female subject use a pair of
scissors that she brought to the business
with her and attempt to cut off an anti-
theft device on a piece of merchandise.
Upon cutting the device, it activated and
the female dropped the merchandise and
attempted to leave the area.
Charges in the case are pending and
both subjects were given trespassing
notices not to return to the business.
At 1:26 p.m. Tuesday, police were
called to a Delphos City School in
response from the principal that a student
was caught with a prescription belonging
to another.
Upon officers arrival, officers found a
student had been found inside the school
with a prescription that did not belong
to him that he was intending to sell. The
investigation found that a second student
was also allegedly selling prescriptions
that did not belong to the student as well.
The principal stated that he wished
to have charges filed on both students
involved.
The case is still under investigation
and no charges had been filed at time of
news release.
At 7 p.m. Oct.
7, police received a
call from a resident
near the Garfield
Park area on South
Clay Street. The
caller advised three
subjects were cur-
rently in the park
and were in pos-
session of what
appeared to be drugs
and drug abuse
instruments.
Upon officers arrival, they located
the subjects involved. Upon officers
approaching the three subjects, one male
subject was observed throwing items
over a nearby fence. Upon checking the
area, officers found three hypodermic
needles.
As a result, officers took John
McRedmond, 19, of Delphos into custo-
dy. McRedmond was cited into Van Wert
Municipal Court on charges of posses-
sion of drug abuse instruments and was
later released.
No charges were filed on the other two
subjects involved at time of news release.
At 1:40 a.m. Oct. 7, police were called
to the 500 block of West Seventh Street
in reference to a criminal damaging com-
plaint at a residence in that area.
Upon officers arrival, the victim stat-
ed that someone had thrown an object
at the residence and had broken a large
window in the residence.
oCallaghan Jr.
Mcredmond
stocklin
ST. RITAS
A boy was born Oct.
11 to Andrea and Andrew
Mancinotti of Delphos.
WeAtHer ForeCAst
tri-county
Associated Press
toDAY: Mostly sunny.
Highs in the upper 60s. East
winds 5 to 15 mph.
toniGHt: Mostly clear
through midnight then becom-
ing partly cloudy. Lows in the
lower 50s. East winds 5 to 10
mph.
tUesDAY: Mostly
cloudy. A 30 percent chance
of showers in the afternoon.
Highs in the lower 70s. South
winds 5 to 15 mph.
tUesDAY niGHt:
Showers likely. Lows in the
mid 50s. Southwest winds 10
to 15 mph. Chance of precipi-
tation 60 percent.
WeDnesDAY: Partly
cloudy with a 30 percent
chance of showers. Highs in
the lower 60s.
WeDnesDAY niGHt:
Partly cloudy with a 20 per-
cent chance of showers. Lows
in the mid 40s.
tHUrsDAY: Partly
cloudy with a 30 percent
chance of showers. Highs in
the upper 50s.
tHUrsDAY niGHt
tHroUGH FriDAY
niGHt: Partly cloudy. Lows
in the lower 40s. Highs in the
upper 50s.
sAtUrDAY AnD
sAtUrDAY niGHt: Mostly
clear. Highs in the upper 50s.
Lows in the upper 30s.
sUnDAY: Partly cloudy
with a 30 percent chance of
rain showers. Highs in the
mid 50s.
CLEVELAND (AP)
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Sunday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $29
million
Pick 3 Evening
2-2-9
Pick 3 Midday
3-6-0
Pick 4 Evening
3-5-6-9
Pick 4 Midday
6-4-2-5
Pick 5 Evening
4-1-8-9-7
Pick 5 Midday
4-5-8-1-9
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $156
million
Rolling Cash 5
02-21-23-33-34
Estimated jackpot:
$120,000
PoHLMAn, Earl H.,
81, of Delphos, Mass
of Christian burial will
be at 11 a.m. today at
St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church, the Rev.
Dave Reinhart officiating.
Burial will be at St. Johns
Cemet er y. Memor i al
contributions may be
made to the Alzheimers
Association or St. Johns
Parish Foundation.
osBorn, Kristi K.,
38, of Anna, funeral ser-
vices are scheduled to
begin at 10:30 a.m. today
at Schlosser Funeral Home
& Cremation Services,
Wapakonet a, Past or
Andrew Atkins officiat-
ing. Burial will follow at
Pearl Cemetery, Sidney.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rial contributions may
be directed to the family
for their childrens edu-
cation. Condolences may
be expressed at www.
schlosserfuneralhome.com.
one Year Ago
The Delphos Herald selects an annual News Carrier
of the Year in conjunction with International Newspaper
Carrier Day. This years honored carrier is Mitchelle
Bradley. Mitchelle, 13, is the son of Lindsey and Kaye
Bradley.
25 Years Ago 1988
Construction on the new shopping center, East Towne
Plaza, on Elida Avenue east of Delphos is scheduled
to begin within the next 30 days. Major tenants Chief
Supermarket, Vals Department and Rite Aid Drug are
scheduled to open in early spring.
Jefferson freshman football team improved its record
to 6-0 with a 22-16 win over Paulding Wednesday at
Stadium Park. The Wildcats opened scoring with Mark
Ridgeways touchdown and two-point conversion by
Max Wisher and repeated the same in the second quar-
ter. Wishers interception with two minutes to play set
the stage for Jeffersons winning touchdown. Behind the
blocking of Doug Haunhorst and Mike Ahten, Wisher
went over for the winning score.
Formal dedication ceremonies will be held at half-
time of the Spencerville football game Friday night for
the new improvements to the Memorial Field complex.
The ceremony will be a re-dedication service. Memorial
Field was proposed and constructed as a permanent
memorial to the communitys servicemen after the end
of World War II.
50 Years Ago 1963
The Cinder Sniffers of Cincinnati, members of the
national Brotherhood of Live Steamers BLS, gave
three of their engines a run over the tracks of the Mid-
Central Chapter of the BLS behind the Akron-Canton-
Youngstown RR yards in Delphos recently. ACY engine
house foreman W. P. Fairfax, who constructed the 450-
foot track two years ago, also ran his three home-built
steamers.
Dr. J. Manning Potts, editor of the magazine The
Upper Room, announced a meditation written by Mrs.
Dorothy Ferres Yocum, wife of the local pastor of
Trinity Methodist Church, has been accepted for pub-
lication. The interdenominational devotional guide has
a worldwide circulation. The meditation will appear in
the Nov. 26 issue.
The ladies branch of the Catholic Knights of America
held a meeting Friday evening in the Knights of
Columbus club rooms. Following the session, cards
were played with the prize being awarded to Bertha
Schmelzer. Marcella Grothouse received the door award.
75 Years Ago 1938
Twenty-seven of the altar boys who are in the grades
at St. Johns enjoyed an outing at Dr. J. L. Sassens
property on South Bredeick Street Wednesday. Ball
games as well as other games were enjoyed and the
outing was climaxed with a wiener roast. Father James
Nett, who is in charge of the acolytes this year, related
some of his interesting experiences while in Palestine.
The members of the W.B.A. Junior organization met
Wednesday evening at the home of Patty Wells, South
Jefferson Street. In three contests, Mona Lou Bardo and
Joan Nixon were awarded the honors while the door
award went to Betty Knepper. In two weeks, the girls
will hold a masquerade party at the home of Joan Nixon,
North Jefferson Street.
The Columbus Day card party and dance held in the
K of C rooms Wednesday evening by the members of
the local council of the Knights of Columbus was well
attended. In five-hundred, Mrs. Carl Nolte and John A.
Metzner were high and Mrs. Otto Stallkamp, Jr., and
John Barheide second. Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Youngpeter
received high honors in pinochle and Mrs. Ed. Miller
and Cyril Hickey were second high.
2
133 E. Main St., Van Wert
419.238.1580
Tues.-Sat. 6am-8:30pm | Sun. 6-7:30pm | Closed Mondays
For your backyard barbecue, we have
$
3
00
lb.
$
4
00
lb.
Shredded BBQ
ChiCken
Shredded BBQ
BeeF
Adults
$
8
00
Children
$
6
00
(5th grade & younger)
Serving: Saturday 4:30-7:00 p.m.
Sunday 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Eat In or Carry Out
$
2513
in Cash
to be given away
Booths, Crafts,
Country Store
&
Treasure Island
OCT 19 & 20
101st Annual
Chicken & Beef
Dinners
*Dinner tickets may be purchased by calling the high school
office at 419-692-5371 or
grade school office at 419-692-8561.
Tickets also available in the grade school hallway
the days of the event.
Childrens Festival
Wednesday, Oct. 16
11:45-2:30 pm
Everyone Welcome!
F
o
o
d
G
a
m
e
s
F
u
n
In The Gym
Must have coupon. Not valid with other
offers or discounts. Expires 10/31/13.
2 LUNCH Buffets
$
1.50 off
Big
buffet
selection
too!
349 Towne CenTer Blvd.
van werT, ohio
(419) 238-5888
Chinese Restaurant
Dine In & Take-Out
2 DINNER Buffets
$
2.00 off
BIG SUSHI MENU
Must have coupon. Not valid with other
offers or discounts. Expires 10/31/13.
Must have coupon. Not valid with other
offers or discounts. Expires 10/31/13.
Sunday Buffet
Served All Day
$
7.99
Up to 6
People
1
Name
Where vet is from

Branch of Military
Years Served from to
Photo submitted by:
Phone #
(to be used for information questions only - not to be published
Please fill out one form for each veteran.
VETERANS
PAST & PRESENT
PHOTOS OF PAST & PRESENT
VETERANS WILL BE PUBLISHED
IN OUR SALUTE TO VETERANS
PUBLICATION NOV. 11.
Photos (most any size) can
be submitted to The Delphos
Herald or email with
information to
graphics@delphosherald.com
Photos can be picked up after the
publication is in the paper. If you
prefer your photo back right
away, you can bring into
the Herald office between 1-4
p.m. and wait for it to be scanned.
Or drop off in the morning and
pick up after 2 p.m.
Photos should be received
by the Herald office by
12 noon Nov. 1.
NAME
TOWN OF RESIDENCE
Branch of service
Dates of Service
419-339-9408
www.angels4animals.net
angelsforanimals@gmail.com
Hours: M-F 1-4
211 S. Greenlawn, Elida, OH
Surgery Prices
Dogs
Females under 50 pounds $80
Females 50-99 pounds $100
Males up to 99 pounds $50
Cats
Females and males: $50
If you bring in 5 or more cats
at one time, $30 each cat
Vaccinations
DHLPP (dog): $15
Bordetella (dog): $15
FVRC (cat): $15
Leukemia (cat): $15
Rabies (dog and cat): $15
Done every Tuesday and Thursday from
1-2 p.m. only; you can walk-in.
Testing
Heartworm (dog): $20
Leukemia (cat): $20
Microchip: $25 **$16.95 Annual fee**
Adoptions
Dogs: $150.00 and up Cats: Free
All of our animals up for adoption are
spayed/neutered.
Dogs are fully vaccinated, heart
worm tested (if over 6 months old),
microchipped and fea treated.
Cats are vaccinated for FVRC-L,
negative for feline leukemia
and fea treated
CLC Life insurance
Janet Siefker
agent
ceLL: 419-234-2572
DeLphos
Ask about CLC Scholarships!
Life Insurance with
Education Plan
Single Premium Life Plan
20 Pay Life Plan
Term Insurance
Annuities
Monday, Occtober 14, 2013 The Herald 3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
Flu Shots
C
L
I
N
I
C

D
A
T
E
S
:
No Charge: Medicare Part B; Others age 18+: $30
Community Health Professionals
602 E. Fifth St., Delphos 419-695-1999
Tue. Oct. 15
5:00 8:00 p.m.
Delphos VFW
Wed. Oct. 16
11:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m.
Trinity United
Methodist, Delphos
1:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Fort Haven Sr. Apts.
Ft. Jennings
Fri. Oct. 18
1:00 - 4:00 p.m.
Delphos Discount Drugs
Sat. Oct. 19
8:00 -10:00 a.m.
Gomer Congregational
Church
Mon. Oct. 21
Noon - 3:00 p.m.
Canal Pharmacy,
Spencerville
5:00 -7:00 p.m.
Immanuel United
Methodist Church
Wed. Oct. 23
10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
K of C, Delphos
Thu. Oct. 24
10:00 a.m. - Noon
US Bank, Delphos
12:30 - 2:30 p.m.
Delphos Senior
Citizens Center
Sat. Oct. 26
8:30 - 11:00 a.m.
Delphos Discount Drugs
More than 15K
pheasants to be
released
COLUMBUS (AP)
Ohio will release more than
15,000 ring-necked pheasants
at 27 Ohio public hunting
areas this fall to provide addi-
tional hunting opportunities
The Ohio Department of
Natural Resources says pheas-
ants will be released Friday
and Oct. 25, prior to the small-
game weekends for youth
hunters.
Ohios small game hunting
season begins Nov. 1, with
pheasant releases scheduled
for Oct. 31 and the evening
of Nov. 8. The final release of
the year is set for the evening
of Nov. 27.
Pheasant hunting season
runs from Nov. 1 through Jan.
5.
State officials say the daily
bag limit is two male birds.
No females can be killed.
Statewide pheasant hunting
hours are sunrise to sunset.
Lake Erie algae a threat
to drinking water
TOLEDO (AP) Toxins from blobs of
algae on western Lake Erie are infiltrating
water treatment plants along the shoreline,
forcing cities to spend a lot more money to
make sure their drinking water is safe.
It got so bad last month that one township
told its 2,000 residents not to drink or use the
water coming from their taps.
The cost of testing and treating the water is
adding up quickly the city of Toledo will
spend an extra $1 million this year to combat
the toxins while a neighboring county is con-
sidering a fee increase next year to cover the
added expenses.
Algae blooms during the summer and early
fall have turned the water into a pea soup
color in recent years. The unsightly surface
has scared away tourists, and toxins produced
by the algae have contributed to oxygen-
deprived dead zones where fish cant survive.
The toxins also are a threat to the drinking
water that the lake provides for 11 million
people.
The annual algae blooms have been con-
centrated around the western end of Lake Erie
though a few have spread to the Cleveland
area and have affected water treatment
plants in Toledo and other cities that dot the
waters edge in northern Ohio.
The algae growth is fed by phosphorous
from farm fertilizer runoff and other sources,
leaving behind toxins that can kill animals and
sicken humans.
Tests on drinking water in Carroll
Township, which is just west of Toledo,
showed the amount of toxins had increased so
much in early September that officials decided
to order residents to stop using the water for
two days until they could hook up to another
water supply.
It was believed to be the first time a city
has banned residents from using the water
because of toxins from algae in the lake.
I wasnt sure how dangerous it was,
but we wanted to be cautious, said Henry
Biggert, the townships water plant superin-
tendent.
The townships treatment plant is now
back online, but the water is being filtered
and treated over a longer period to remove the
toxins, he said.
What makes combating these toxins a chal-
lenge for operators of water treatment plants
is that there are no standards on how to handle
the problem or federal guidelines on what is
a safe amount in drinking water. Plus, each
water treatment facility is unique.
Plant operators along the lake in Ohio have
been teaming up to figure out what works
best.
Were out there scrambling around, said
Kelly Frey, Ottawa Countys sanitary engi-
neer. Its just been do the best you can.
The county, he said, tests the water three
times a week while adding a chemical called
activated carbon to absorb the algae before
filtering it. The expense of treating the water
may require an increase in water rates next
year of a couple of dollars a month for the
average family, Frey said.
Toledo prison hit
by rising violence
TOLEDO (AP) Authorities at the state prison in
Toledo have seen inmate violence continuing to rise
despite a series of changes, with four slayings in 13
months.
The Blade reports that after the Toledo Correctional
Institutions first homicide last year, staffing was
increased on nights and weekends and a second investi-
gator added. Then another inmate was killed in his cell
this year, and the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and
Correction added nine officers to the maximum-security
prison.
There have been two more deadly assaults this year,
the latest coming Oct. 6 when Michael Dodson, 38, died
at a hospital after being assaulted in his cell. The Lucas
County coroners office said he died from blunt-force
injuries to his neck and head. Inmate James Oglesby was
killed in August after being attacked by a metal baseball
bat in a recreation area.
Ohio statistics show the four slayings are the most in
the past 13 months of any state prison. Authorities say
there are more fights, too. The prison investigated 136
incidents of inmate-on-inmate violence in 2010-12. The
prison began in 2011 taking in maximum-security pris-
oners from around the state, putting two inmates in each
cell to deal with statewide overcrowding.
State prisons spokeswoman JoEllen Smith said among
the changes at Toledo have been using a merit dorm for
well-behaved inmates isolated from the most violent,
and extra surveillance cameras were installed.
The Blade said a legislatively established commit-
tee that monitors prisons found that inmate-on-inmate
assaults jumped about 113 percent and inmate-on-staff
assaults were up some 74 percent from 2010 to 2012
at the Toledo prison. Watchdog groups have also found
high employee turnover at Toledo.
Guard union officials say the staff additions havent
been enough, and more is needed.
The mood inside the prison is that we need more
staff. We have too many inmates, said Ryan Ochmanek,
a corrections officer and union steward. Were over-
crowded and, with double-bunking, we need more staff.
The American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio said lack
of funding to staff prisons and inmate overcrowding cre-
ate dangerous situations in prisons.
Ohio student loan default
rate among highest
DAYTON (AP) Ohios student loan default rate is among
the 10 highest in the country with nearly 30,000 Ohioans
defaulting on federal loans they were supposed to start repay-
ing in 2010, a newspaper reported.
A total of 29,500 Ohioans are among more than 600,000
former college students defaulting on student loans for the
three-year period, the Dayton Daily News reports. Ohios
default rate over that time increased from 13.2 percent to 16.2
percent, according to new data from the U.S. Department of
Education.
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau reports that
more than 7 million borrowers are currently in default on a
federal or private student loan, meaning they missed payment
for nine months.
Defaults leave borrowers facing problems that include late
fees, added interests, wage garnishment and court costs.
The consequences of default are so severe, said Lauren
Asher, president of The Institute for College Access and
Success.
She said the debt can follow borrowers for the rest of their
lives, ruining their credit and making it difficult to buy a car
or rent an apartment. It can also limit job prospects and make
it impossible to get federal grants or loans to return to school,
Asher said.
State increasing
penalties for
unemployment fraud
COLUMBUS (AP)
Ohio officials want to send
a clear message with tough
new penalties against
unempl oyment fraud:
Dont do it.
Beginning Oct. 21, the
Ohio Department of Job
and Family Services may
impose fines of up to a
quarter of the total amount
of unemployment bene-
fits an individual collects
through fraud.
If an employers repeat-
ed refusal to provide infor-
mation about an unemploy-
ment compensation claim-
ant results in erroneous
benefits being paid, the
employer could face penal-
ties, too.
Diana exhibit to
conclude public tour
in Cincinnati
CINCINNATI (AP) The
Cincinnati Museum Center
will be the last stop next year
on the public exhibition tour
for an exhibition about the late
Princess Diana.
The exhibit titled Diana:
A Celebration displays her
wedding dress, a tiara, and
some 150 pieces of memo-
rabilia about the famed and
ill-fated Lady Diana Spencer,
killed in a 1997 car crash in
Paris.
The items are on loan
from the Althorp Estate, the
Spencer familys ancestral
home in England. They will
be turned over to Dianas sons
later.
The center will host the
exhibit from Feb 14-Aug. 17.
It includes the ivory silk
dress she wore before a global
audience in her 1981 wedding,
designer gowns and suits,
home movies and photos,
and condolence books signed
by the public. Other items
include childhood toys and a
copy of the special adaptation
of Candle in the Wind sung
by Elton John at her funeral,
signed by him and co-writer
Bernie Taupin.
The exhibit puts into con-
text the things she was able to
accomplish in the short period
of time she lived, said John
Norman, president of the Arts
and Exhibits International,
which organized the exhibi-
tion.
The dress and other memo-
rabilia have been displayed
each July and August at the
Althorp estate.
More than 1 million people
have already seen the touring
exhibit since 2003. Cincinnati
officials are delighted to be the
last to show it, The Cincinnati
Enquirer reports.
Theres a sense of urgency
and excitement around having
those objects on display for
the last time, said Elizabeth
Pierce, the museum centers
vice president for marketing
and communications.
It began display last month
at the Putnam Museum in
Davenport, Iowa, through Jan.
5.
NE Ohio authorities
find 150-plus snakes
in home
STRUTHERS (AP)
Authorities in northeast Ohio
say they have found more than
150 snakes, some poisonous, in
a home.
News media in the
Youngstown area report that a
man faces charges including
child endangering because a
12-year-old child lives in the
home. WFMJ says authorities
went to the home of 46-year-old
Joseph McCollum to check on
him because he had been bitten
by a rattlesnake and didnt get
proper treatment.
WFMJ reports that
McCollum is an operator of The
Boa Store, which sells Boa con-
strictors online.
Animal control officer
Dave Nelson said the home
in Struthers also had poison-
ous snakes include rattlers and
cobras. The officer from the
Mahoning County dog wardens
office said he had dealt with dan-
gerous snakes before, but not so
many at once.
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you should. Still, if current events are making you feel
uncertain about your fnances, you should schedule a
complimentary portfolio review. That way, you can help
ensure youre in control of where you want to go and
how you can potentially get there.
You cant control
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4 The Herald Monday, October 14, 2013
www.delphosherald.com
Elizabeth Renee Kill and Anthony Richard
Bonifas were united in marriage on July 6, 2013, at
St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church, the Rev.
Chris Bohnsack officiating.
The bride is the daughter of Joyce Kill of
Delphos and the late Timothy Kill. The groom is the
son of Jim and Jann Bonifas of Venedocia.
Nuptial music was provided by vocalists Bridgette
Smith and Carie Martz and organist Lynn Bockey.
Matrons of honor were Angela Lyons and Hope
Scott, sisters of the bride.
Bridesmaids included Lindsay Stechschulte and
Debbie Allen, friends of the couple; Melinda Aiken,
sister of the groom; and Aubrey Scott, niece of the
bride.
Madison Aiken, nieces of the groom, was the
flower girl and Matthew Scott, nephew of the bride,
was the ring bearer.
Best man was Nate Armanini, cousin of the
groom.
Groomsmen included Aaron Rose and Josh Rose,
cousins of the bride; Brice Schulte, cousin of
the groom; Ben Warnecke, Todd Trentman, Kris
Donathan and Seth Allen, friends of the couple; and
J.W. Aiken, brother-in-law of the groom.
Grandparents of the couple include Betty Rose
and the late Leonard Rose, Mary Kill and the late
William Kill, Richard and Jane Bonifas and Mary
Jane Watkins and the late Will Watkins.
A reception was held at the Lima Civic Center
following the ceremonies.
After a honeymoon in Montego Bay, Jamaica, the
couple resides in Powell.
The bride is a graduate of St. Johns High School
and Rhodes State College. She is a registered nurse
at Mount Carmel West. The groom is a graduate of
Jefferson High School and Rhodes State College.
He is a registered nurse at Nationwide Childrens
Hospital.
Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Bonifas
Wedding Gravity eclipses Phillips at box office
LOS ANGELES (AP) Gravity
wont be held down.
The Warner Bros. astronaut adven-
ture directed by Alfonso Cuaron and
starring Sandra Bullock and George
Clooney landed in the top spot at the
box office for the second weekend in
a row, according to studio estimates
Sunday.
Gravity earned $44.3 million,
raising its domestic total to $123.4
million.
They say what goes up must come
down, but thats not really true with
Gravity, said Paul Dergarabedian,
senior media analyst for box office
tracker Rentrak. To have opened as
big as it did last week and only drop
21 percent, thats really an amazing
hold. Its a direct testament to the
word of mouth on the movie.
Gravity also fared well overseas,
making $28 million in 38 territories
such as Russia, Australia, Germany
and Spain.
Sonys Captain Phillips launched
in second place with a respectable $26
million. The high seas drama directed
by Paul Greengrass stars Tom Hanks
as a cargo ship captain who is held
captive by Somali pirates.
We think the success of Gravity
will also bode well for Captain
Phillips, said Rory Bruer, head of
distribution for Sony Pictures. This
is the extraordinary kind of film that
we think audiences will flock to over
the next several months moving for-
ward.
The animated Sony movie Cloudy
with a Chance of Meatballs 2 gob-
bled up third place in its third week-
end with $14.2 million, bringing its
domestic haul to $78 million.
The weekends only other new
release, Machete Kills, opened
in fourth place with $3.8 million.
The gun-toting sequel from direc-
tor Robert Rodriguez and starring
Danny Trejo and Michelle Rodriguez
is the follow-up to Machete, which
earned $11.4 million when it opened
in 2010.

Estimated ticket sales for Friday


through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian
theaters, according to Rentrak. Final
domestic figures will be released
today.
1. Gravity, $44.3 million ($28
million international).
2. Captain Phillips, $26 million.
3. Cloudy with a Chance Of
Meatballs 2, $14.2 million ($9.1
million international).
4. Machete Kills, $3.8 million
($575,000 international).
5. Runner Runner, $3.7 million
($5.3 million international).
6. Prisoners, $3.7 million ($7.4
million international).
7. Insidious: Chapter 2, $2.6 mil-
lion ($7.1 million international).
8. Rush, $2.4 million ($6 million
international).
9. Don Jon, $2.3 million.
10. Baggage Claim, $2 million.

Estimated weekend ticket sales


Friday through Sunday at internation-
al theaters (excluding the U.S. and
Canada) for films distributed overseas
by Hollywood studios, according to
Rentrak:
1. Gravity, $28 million.
2. Stalingrad, $15.5 million.
3. Despicable Me 2, $10.1 mil-
lion.
4. Cloudy with a Chance of
Meatballs 2, $9.1 million.
5. Now You See Me, $8.2 mil-
lion.
6. Prisoners, $7.4 million.
7. Insidious: Chapter 2, $7.1
million.
8. Planes, $6.2 million.
9. Rush, $6 million.
9. Hwayi: A Monster Boy, $6
million.
9. Young Detective Dee: Rise Sea
Dragon, $6 million.
10. Turbo, $5.4 million.
Dying Ohio man on gurney
leads daughter down aisle
CLEVELAND (AP) A terminally ill Ohio man
who arrived at his daughters wedding by ambulance
gave her away, from a hospital gurney.
Guests cried and clapped as Scott Nagy took part in
daughter Sarahs wedding Saturday at First Evangelical
Lutheran Church in Strongsville, The Plain Dealer of
Cleveland reported.
A volunteer team of medical professionals helped
Nagy escort the 24-year-old bride as groom Angelo
Salvatore and the Rev. Chuck Knerem awaited their
arrival.
It was a promise I made in March, to walk her down
the aisle, said the 56-year-old Brunswick man. Shes
my princess. This is my definition of walking down the
aisle.
Nagy was diagnosed last year with urethral cancer and
has undergone chemotherapy. He has been at University
Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center since August.
Doctors were uncertain if he would be able to make
the wedding, initially scheduled for next year. But with
monitor cords slipped under his tuxedo and a tracheal
tube attached, he made the trip down the aisle, kissing a
grandson who was the ringbearer and giving a thumbs
up.
There was no way he was not going to finish this
out, said his wife Jean.
Jacky Uljanic, a nurse practitioner with the hospital,
helped make the arrangements for Nagy to attend the
wedding. She put him through daily therapy to build up
his strength and she checked on the logistics in advance.
Physicians Medical Transport donated the ambulance
trip, and a doctor and other medical personnel accom-
panied Nagy on the ride.
Sarah said that since she was a little girl, she has
wanted her father to escort her down the aisle when she
married. She said her future husband assured her she
would get her wish.
At the vestibule, she burst into tears and told her
father she loved him.
We did it, Nagy said to her and reminded her not to
streak her makeup.
Like The Delphos
Herald on Facebook
for todays headlines.
Blues museum to call St.
Louis home, sweet home
ST. LOUIS (AP) Die-
hard music lovers, casual
fans and globe-trotting tour-
ists readily embrace Chicago
as the home of the blues,
spurred in large part by the
Great Migration northward
of Southern blacks in the
early and mid-20th century.
Robert Johnson, the genres
godfather, famously sang of
Sweet Home Chicago, and
the Chicago Blues Festival
draws more than 100,000 peo-
ple each summer.
But come next year, the
National Blues Museum
wont find a home in Chicago,
but in a rival Midwest city
300 miles to the south.
St. Louis has its own
deserving musical history,
organizers of the project say,
with hometown heroes such
as Ike Turner, Albert King
and, of course, Chuck Berry.
Its a legacy most promi-
nently commemorated in the
name of the citys National
Hockey League team, the St.
Louis Blues.
We date way back,
said museum organizer
and music promoter Dave
Beardsley. Chicago didnt
really blow up until the 50s,
til Muddy (Waters) plugged
in and went electric. We go
back to W. C. Handy (who
would later write St. Louis
Blues) in 1893. Our
roots are far deeper than
anyone knows.
The St. Louis museum
grew out of a shared pas-
sion by Beardsley and fellow
blues buff Mike Kociela, also
a concert and festival promot-
er. Inspired by regular trips
to the New Orleans Jazz and
Heritage Festival, Kociela
created St. Louis Bluesweek
in 2010 to honor the citys
musicians and heritage.
While Chicago has tried
and failed to launch simi-
lar blues shrines, St. Louis
$14 million project won the
backing of a local developer
who wanted a museum to
anchor a retail, residential
and office complex next to
the convention center down-
town, just blocks from the
Gateway Arch.
There really wasnt a
museum that told the entire
story of the blues, from Day
One through now, Kociela
said. I knew what it could do
for our city and our region.
This is a massive interna-
tional tourist attraction.
Kociela and Beardsley
reached out to leaders and
musicians in cities with com-
parable bragging rights
chiefly Chicago, Memphis
and Clarksdale, Miss.,
for help, and none object-
ed, Kocielsa said. To pitch
the project, they brought in
some of the genres contem-
porary heavy hitters: Buddy
Guy, Robert Cray, Shemekia
Copeland, Derek Trucks and
Trombone Shorty.
It worked. Pinnacle
Entertainment, which
owns two casinos in the
St. Louis suburbs, donated
$6 million to the planned
23,000-square-foot inter-
active museum with class-
rooms and a small theater to
host local and national acts.
As for the home of the
blues, Chicago is focusing
on promoting live perfor-
mances year-around instead
of investing in a brick-and-
mortar tribute, said Michelle
Boone, commissioner of
Chicagos Department
of Cultural Affairs and
Special Events. Nor is the
city involved in last-gasp
efforts to preserve the for-
mer home of Muddy Waters,
which lapsed into foreclo-
sure and was nearly con-
demned before a relative of
the blues titan purchased it
at auction over the summer
for $100,000.
There arent any con-
versations about that right
now, Boone said.
An affluent couple has
proposed a museum called
The Blues Experience first
at a vacant shopping center
in Chicagos Loop and more
recently at Navy Pier. But
neither responded to mes-
sages seeking comment and
city officials said they could
offer no specific details.
Were the worlds capi-
tal of the blues, said Linda
Cain, publisher of an online
guide to Chicago blues. We
could stand to do more.
George Brock, an
81-year-old blues harmoni-
ca player, stands behind St.
Louis claim to blues fame.
A half-century ago, Brock
moved to St. Louis from
Clarksdale, Miss., and he
calls his adopted hometown
a gem where blues can still
be heard seven nights a week
and a musician can make an
honest living.
They overlooked St.
Louis, he said. St. Louis
has just as much blues as
Chicago.
St. Louis is a major
blues community, says
Robert Santelli, a music his-
torian and executive director
of The Grammy Museum in
Los Angeles. Its a distinc-
tion earned in part due to the
Mississippi River and the
stream of levee builders and
stevedores who called the
city home.
Happy
Birthday
1
Monday, October 14, 2013 The Herald 5 www.delphosherald.com
COMMUNITY
Landmark
Calendar of
Events
St. Josephs Church,
Fort Jennings
TODAY
11:30 a.m. Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
6 p.m. Middle Point
Village Council meets
6:30 p.m. Shelter from
the Storm support group
meets in the Delphos Public
Library basement.
7 p.m. Marion Township
trustees at township house.
Middle Point council
meets at town hall.
7:30 p.m. Delphos City
Schools Board of Education
meets at the administration
office.
Delphos Knights of
Columbus meet at the K of
C hall.
Delphos Eagles Aerie 471
meets at the Eagles Lodge.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
1-3 p.m. Delphos Area
Visiting Nurses offer free
blood pressure checks at
Delphos Discount Drugs.
7:30 p.m. Elida School
Board meets at the high
school office.
Alcoholics Anonymous,
First Presbyterian Church,
310 W. Second St.
Fort Jennings Village
Council meets at Fort
Jennings Library.
WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St. Kalida.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
Noon Rotary Club
meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. Johns Chapel.
6:30 p.m. Delphos
Kiwanis Club, Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
7 p.m. Bingo at St.
Johns Little Theatre.
7:30 p.m. Hope Lodge
214 Free and Accepted
Masons, Masonic Temple,
North Main Street.
Sons of the American
Legion meet at the Delphos
Legion hall.
The Ottoville Board of
Education meets in the ele-
mentary building.
The Fort Jennings Board
of Education meets in the
library.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
Ottoville High School class of 1963 holds 50th reunion
Members of the Ottoville High School class of 1963 met Sept. 28 for their 50th reunion. In attendance were, front from left, Dan Byrne, Larry
Horstman, Michael Miller, Carl Turnwald, Tom Keller and Mike Swint; row two, Betty (Honigford) Wannemacher, Mary Beth (Heck) Jutte,
Charlene (Wannemacher) Willey, Theresa (Hoorman) Birkemeier, Anges (Brinkman) Swint, Joyce Lehman (Sr. Joyce, CPPS) and Jeanette
(Gasser) Myers; row three, Irene (Ruen) Bullard, Norma (Hilvers) Burgei, Janet (Grubenhoff) Mescher, Stephanie (Niedecken) Heitmeyer, Cora
Ann (Smith) Garrison and Sharon (Wieman) Brickner; and back, Paul Langhals, Mark Hilvers, James Wannemacher, Thomas Klima, Eugene
Hilvers and Donald Michel. Attending but not pictured was John Herman. (Submitted photo)
OCT. 13
Chris Rhinock
Melissa Buss
Bill Endres
Luke Bonifas
John E. Friemoth
OCT. 14
Michael Camper
Josh Stewart
Cathy Kramer
Ted Verhoff
Eric Peters
Harry Hodgson
Kaitlyn Kirk
Parker Brantley
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NWC 2013
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS
Team Scores: Spencerville 38,
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scores: Ada, Allen East, Paulding).
Top 20 Individuals: 1. Karri Purdy (S) 20:51; 2. Cierra Adams (S) 21:53;
3. Anna Gorman (L) 21:57; 4. Tori Hardesty (S) 22:13; 5. Megan Langhals
(CG) 22:45; 6. Marshall (B) 22:53; 7. Schweyer (B) 23:01; 8. Humphreys (B)
23:05; 9. Leah Myerholtz (CG) 23:08; 10. Brooke Ripley (CV) 23:09; 11. Hali
Finfrock (CV) 23:30; 12. Johanns (P) 23:35; 13. Sommers (B) 23:43; 14. Macy
McCluer (CG) 23:46; 15. Megan Miller (S) 23:47; 16. Gracyn Stechschulte
(CG) 23:55; 17. Shepherd (P) 24:09; 18. Candace Downing (CG) 24:10; 19.
Kacie Mulholland (S) 24:19; 20. Swinehart (AE) 24:20.
Other Local Finishers (54 Runners): 22. Chelsea Hancock (CV) 24:32;
23. Lindsey Malsam (CG) 24:33; 24. Abbie Enyart (L) 24:35; 25. Meghan
Sherman (CV) 24:40; 27. Kirsten Malsam (CG) 24:48; 28. Kayla Parlette
(CG) 24:53; 29. Linnea Stephens (CG) 25:03; 31. Vicki Callow (CV) 25:22;
32. Eden Allison (CV) 25:30; 33. Claira Rhoades (L) 25:39; 34. Janelle May
(CV) 25:42; 35. Morgan Messer (CG) 25:42; 37. Julia Bogart (CG) 25:50; 38.
Stacy Hovest (CG) 26:00; 39. Tesa Horton (S) 26:10; 40. Ashley Keiber (S)
26:22; 41. Mikinizie Dull (L) 26:38; 42. Danielle Schramm (CG) 26:44; 46.
Brooke Schnipke (CG) 27:27; 47. Micah Stechschulte (CG) 27:28; 48. Emma
Saylor (CV) 27:34; 49. Lindsay Langhals (CG) 28:34; 51. Ryanne Ducheney
(L) 28:53; 53. Sophia Smith (CV) 30:58; 54. Maddie Penix (CV) 31:15.
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS
Team Scores: Lincolnview 36, Columbus Grove 39, Crestview 53,
Paulding 130, Spencerville 153, Bluffton 164, Allen East 183, Ada 210.
Top 20 Individuals: 1. Mycah Grandstaff (CV) 16:36; 2. Colton Grothaus
(CG) 16:36; 3. Bayley Tow (L) 16:44; 4. Alex Rodriguez (L) 17:23; 5. Charles
Thornburg (CV) 17:35; 6. Logan Douglas (CG) 17:36; 7. Ben Bilimek (L)
17:40; 8. Lee Altenburger (CG) 17:42; 9. Travis Lippi (L) 17:57; 10. Branden
Clayton (CV) 17:57; 11. Jerry Kesselmayer (CG) 18:00; 12. Bryce Sharrits
(CG) 18:13; 13. Trevor Neate (L) 18:15; 14. Bryce Richardson (CV) 18:28;
15. Colton Snyder (L) 18:29; 16. Boone Brubaker (CG) 18:30; 17. Alex Tabler
(CG) 18:33; 18. Phillip Vance (CG) 18:34; 19. Thad Ringwald (S) 18:36; 20.
Zach Shafer (CG) 18:39.
Other Local Finishers (89 Runners): 25. Adam Saylor (CV) 19:07; 27.
Cody Mefferd (CV) 19:11; 30. Preston Brubaker (CG) 19:17; 31. Tyler Brant
(L) 19:21; 32. Cody Reynolds (CG) 19:24; 34. Troy Thompson (L) 19:35;
35. Matt Hurles (S) 19:41; 36. Jon Krouse (CV) 19:43; 38. David Wisher
(S) 19:49; 39. Ryan Price (CG) 19:56; 40. Copsey Bogle (CV) 19:59; 41.
Austin Sealscott (L) 20:01; 43. Andy Burnett (CV) 20:09; 44. Caleb Bagley
(CV) 20:14; 45. Ed Smith (S) 20:17; 46. Tanner Skelton (CV) 20:20; 48.
Austin Elick (L) 20:35; 49. Tracey West (L) 20:35; 50. Jacob Cook (S) 20:38;
54. Ryan Tabler (CG) 20:43; 55. Cody Wischmeyer (CG) 20:46; 56. Corey
Schroeder (CG) 20:53; 57. Eli Jones (CV) 20:58; 58. Doug Hicks (L) 20:59;
59. Jacob Germann (CV) 21:06; 60. Noah Daugherty (CV) 21:24; 61. Noah
Smith (CV) 21:37; 63. Andrew Fickert (L) 21:45; 65. Austin Sager (CG)
21:54; 67. Landon Goins (CV) 22:02; 68. Austin Conrad (S) 22:09; 70. Dalton
Hines (L) 22:22; 71. Caleb Moore (L) 22:30; 73. Dylan Sparks (CV) 22:40;
75. Micah Germann (L) 22:44; 77. Griffen Waltmire (CV) 23:02; 81. Tanner
Crowle (CV) 23:49; 83. Connor Vogt (S) 24:42; 86. Jacob Bradford (L) 26:22.
JUNIOR HIGH BOYS
Team Scores: Lincolnview 27, Paulding 79, Spencerville 81, Crestview
100, Bluffton 104, Columbus Grove 117 (No team scores: Ada, Allen East).
Top 20 Individuals: 1. Calahan Wolfrum (L) 11:37; 2. Robert Modic (S)
11:59; 3. Harnish (B) 12:08; 4. Sam Myers (L) 12:10; 5. Karter Tow (L)
12:26; 6. Grant Mumaugh (CG) 12:33; 7. Sterling Rigdon (L) 12:42; 8. Josh
Cook (S) 12:56; 9. Manz (P) 13:00; 10. Alek Bowersock (L) 13:06; 11. Jordan
Perrott (CV) 13:15; 12. Kohart (P) 13:19; 13. Corbin Roberts (L) 13:28; 14.
Matt Wood (S) 13:29; 15. Young (B) 13:29; 16. Logan Williams (L) 13:30; 17.
Shull (P) 13:31; 18. Andrew Robinson (L) 13:34; 19. Gabe Smith (CV) 13:41;
20. Letso (P) 13:51.
Other Local Finishers (43 Runners): 21. Parker Sager (CG) 13:54; 22.
Keegan Cowan (L) 14:00; 23. Collin Puckett (CV) 14:03; 25. Jacob Bowman
(CV) 14:36; 28. Kalob Pitson (S) 14:39; 29. Tyler White (CV) 14:40; 30.
James Greathouse (L) 14:41; 31. Evan Messer (CG) 14:47; 33. Jacob Keysor
(L) 15:07; 34. Austin Rode (CG) 15:08; 35. Hunter Stephen (S) 15:11; 36.
Dylan Neate (L) 15:33; 38. Cameron Jay (CG) 15:48; 39. Noah Daeger (L)
16:24; 40. Robert Germann (CV) 18:15; 41. Cameron McAbee (L) 18:48.
JUNIOR HIGH GIRLS
Team Scores: Bluffton 22, Lincolnview 41, Crestview 65 (No team scores:
Spencerville, Columbus Grove, Ada, Allen East, Paulding).
Top 20 Individuals: 1. Bailey Dunifon (CG) 13:36; 2. Kindle (B) 13:53; 3.
Kaitlyn Price (CG) 13:54; 4. Hoff (B) 14:00; 5. Conley (B) 14:08; 6. Brayden
Langdon (L) 14:14; 7. Fett (B) 14:17; 8. Trinity Welch (L) 14:43; 9. Alena
Looser (L) 14:52; 10. Sadie Brower (CV) 15:22; 11. Grace Hotmire (CV)
15:23; 12. Jenna Henline (S) 15:27; 13. Jayden Smith (S) 15:27; 14. Destiney
Fiely (S) 15:28; 15. Olivia Gorman (L) 15:39; 16. Klinger (B) 16:18; 17.
Matteson Watts (CV) 16:19; 18. Yost (B) 16:27; 19. Miah Katalenas (L) 16:31;
20. Alexis Price (CG) 16:31.
Other Local Finishers (34 Runners): 23. Kathy Tate (L) 17:26; 24. Olivia
Skelton (CV) 17:39; 25. Haley Overholt (L) 17:55; 27. Madison Sill (L) 18:01;
30. Faith Keezer (CV) 19:30; 32. Janie Boroff (CV) 20:06; 33. Sarah Haggerty
(CV) 21:36; 34. Shae Hines (L) 28:18.
6 The Herald Monday, October 14, 2013
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Lady Cavs shut out Wildcats in soccer tourney
By JIM METCALFE
Staff Writer
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
ELIDA A deep Coldwater girls
soccer squad wore down an undermanned
Jefferson unit 5-0 in Division III sectional
action under the lights Saturday night at
the Elida Soccer Complex.
We started out with 16 girls and we
were down to 13 today. Despite that,
these girls kept battling to the end. They
never gave up, no matter what, Jefferson
coach Josiah Stober said. They did wear
us down; when they could sub in six girls
at a time, we had one or two. I am so
proud of the effort the girls have given all
season and gave today.
Coldwater coach Scott Brinkman fig-
ured his teams depth would pay off.
We had 22 dressed today all that
youre allowed to by the rules and
another seven that we couldnt dress;
we used them all, he explained. I am
extremely pleased with our defense; I
thought in particular that Paige Siefring
had her best match of the season. She
stayed with her girl all night long, who-
ever it was. Then, Alanna doesnt let
anything through. This was a great team
effort from front to back.
The Lady Cavaliers (7-9) had the first
shot just 48 seconds into the matchup as
Erica Sudhoff fired from 16 yards but
freshman keeper Makaya Dunning (8
saves vs. 13 shots on-goal) subbing for
injured junior Kayleigh OConnor got
the save.
She did the same on a 14-yarder by
Holly Rindler at 32:04.
She could not at 20:09. Brianna
Obringer had the original attempt a
16-yarder from the left wing that
Dunning deflected to the opposite side,
where Haley Kahlig was in perfect posi-
tion to put back the ricochet.
The Lady Wildcats (6-9-2) had their
first attempt at 17:26 when sophomore
Logan Hamilton had a free kick from the
right sideline but her shot was well wide
of the mark.
The Cavaliers had a pair of efforts the
rest of the half: at 17:00, when Dunning
stopped a shot from Leslie Stelzer; and at
9:50, when Stelzer had a prime opening
in from of the net but was just over the
crossbar.
Jefferson had the first shot on-goal
of the second half at 36:31 when
junior Bailey Miller let one loose from
just outside the box but keeper Alanna
Severt (2 saves vs. 2 shots on-goal) came
up with the goods.
Coldwater put up its second goal at
35:33 of the second half. A long kick
from Severt fueled a quick counterattack
that eventually got to Rindler; she fired a
12-yarder from the right wing that went
over the top and into the twine.
At 33:35, Anna Kahlig had a 28-yard-
er deflected away by Dunning.
The Red and White almost had a goal
at 27:00 when Miller fired from 28 yards
and the orb nearly slipped out of Severts
hands but she eventually got the save.
The Cavaliers made it 3-0 at 21:45.
Kaitlyn Schmit made a nice lead pass
from the right side to the middle, where
Rachel Luthman got enough control of
the bouncing ball to go over the top from
eight yards.
They nearly made it a 4-goal lead at
the 18-minute mark when Jenna Black
almost connected with Haley Kahlig on
a corner kick but her 8-yarder just missed
wide left.
The visiting team made it 4-0 at 14:18
when Rindler got on a run down the left
side, veered toward the wing and went
high side from 13 yards.
The Wildcats again had a chance at
11:29 on a crossing pass from Hamilton.
Severt came out to intercept but the ball
slipped out of her hands; she had to
scramble to prevent a follow shot.
Junior Kylee Haehn had an opening
for Delphos at 7:28 after she beat the
keeper to a free ball on the right post but
just missed wide to that side.
Coldwater almost made it 5-0 at 5:20.
On a free kick by Anna Kahlig, her
20-yard shot forced a diving deflection
by Dunning; Sudhoffs follow from in
close was over the bar.
Haehn had a 16-yarder at 1:32 that
backup netminder Brittany Muhlenkamp
(2 saves, 2 shots) grabbed after a deflec-
tion.
With just three seconds to go, the
Cavaliers tacked on the final tally. Taylar
May crossed the ball from the right side-
line to Kylie Post in front and she put the
ball in the back of the net.
We have come a long way this year,
from start to finish. We have all but
Brooke Hesseling back, Stober added.
She played in less than half our matches
because of injury but she still showed
leadership any way she could. I am look-
ing forward to see what we do in the off-
season; we have 5-7 girls that play club
and Id like to see us have a few more.
Throw in what I expect will be a few
freshmen next year and the future looks
bright for Jefferson soccer.
Coldwater advances to play second-
seeded St. Johns at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
Jefferson junior Kylee Haehn consid-
ers her options before approaching this
free kick near the right sideline in the
first half of the Lady Wildcats sectional
soccer tussle against Coldwater at Elida
Saturday night. (Delphos Herald/Jim
Metcalfe)
Cross Country Results
Bearcat girls, Lancer boys top NWC harriers
By JIM METCALFE
Staff Writer
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
VAN WERT Karri Purdy led the Spencerville girls cross
country team to a first-place finish in the Northwest Conference
meet held on a picture-perfect Saturday afternoon at ther
Van Wert County Reservoir.
The Lady Bearcats amassed 38 points in the 5-team
race. Bluffton was second (51), Columbus Grove third (58),
Crestview fourth (87), followed by Lincolnviews 115.
On the boys side, Lincolnview came in first of the eight
teams (36), followed by Columbus Grove (39), Crestview
(53), Paulding (130), Spencerville (153), Bluffton (164),
Allen East (183) and Ada (210).
On the girls side, Purdy finished first as an individual with a
clocking of 20:51 and Cierra Adams was second (21:53).
To go 1-2 is a good day for the girls. Our top three all did well
but the difference today was our fourth and fith runners, Lady
Bearcat mentor Brian McMichael said. We talk a lot about run-
ning in a pack and trying to move up as a pack. What is key for us
is that the fourth and fifth girls and beyond move closer to
the front-runners and we did that today. Thats what we work
on constantly throughout the season and we have to work on
it this week to get ready for Districts and hopefully beyond.
Megan Langhals came in fifth to lead the third-place Lady
Bulldogs (22:45) and Leah Myerholtz (23:08) was ninth.
We had a couple of injuries today, especially my number
one, Alexis Ricker. She fell out of the race about halfway through
with an injury and that kept us from possibly winning; we knew it
would be between us, Spencerville and Bluffton, Lady Bulldog
coach Jason Jay said. It was a really competitive race to begin
with. You work hard all season to keep your girls in shape and yet
keep them healthy and this was a stroke of bad luck. Hopefully, it is
nothing serious and we will have her back for Districts next week.
The Lady Knights top finishers were Brooke Ripley in 10th
(23:09) and Hali Finfrock right behind (23:30)
We talked about running with determination today before the
meet and that is what they all did. As a coach, that is what you like
to see; that shows a lot of character, Crestview head man Mark
Bagley remarked. These girls are extremely coachable and they
keep improving; thats all you can ask as a coach. To show you the
character they have, we ran at the Coldwater meet 10 days ago and
afterward, there were a lot of cups and stuff lying around; the girls
went and asked for bags to help clean up. I really appreciate that.
Anna Gorman (21:57) came in third for the Lady Lancers and
Abbie Enyart was 24th (24:35).
All five of our girls ran wll but we only have those five. We
have no margin for error, Lady Lancer mentor Matt
Langdon explained. All five of them have to be on
their best race for us to do well as a team. Well have
to run even better next week. I really like their atti-
tudes and we dont have a senior, so they will all be
back. They are excited about the junior high girls we
have coming in next year and the year after.
In the boys race, Crestviews Mycah Grandstaff
(16:36), Groves Colton Grothaus (16:36) and Lancer Bayley Tow
(16:44) came in 1-2-3.
You know what youre going to get with Bayley but he simply
lost to two great runners today. That will help him down the road;
we knew it would be a 3-man race today and they set the pace,
Langdon added. The other guys really ran well, especially Alex.
I dont know if we are peaking but we are running better at just
the right time. The good thing about these guys is they
work hard and they love the sport. That makes them so
enjoyable to coach and fun to be around.
Alex Rodriguez was fourth for the Lancers (17:23),
Charles Thornburg fifth for the Knights and Logan
Duglas sixth for the Bulldogs (17:36).
Bulldog coach Terry Schnipke was pleased with his
teams performance.
Colton and Tow have been going at it all season; I think
Colton has beaten him three times and Tow has beaten him
twice; that is what makes you better because you have to, he
explained. Throw in Grandstaff, who is another terrific runner
but hasnt raced as much due to injury, and its clearly those
three. Im just thankful to God that we have battled through
some adversity and were healthy and peaking at the right time.
In cross country, its a fine line between working them hard
enough to stay sharp and yet backing off when you need to for
maximum health.
Bagley knows something about that.
Associated Press
The Green Bay Packers lost receivers
Randall Cobb and James Jones to leg
injuries in the first half at Baltimore on
Sunday.
Jones appeared to hurt his left knee on
a pass play in the first quarter. He limped
off the field and the Packers called it a
leg injury.
Cobb, the teams best breakaway
threat at the position, was injured when
he was struck in the right leg on a tackle
by safety Matt Elam near the end of the
half.
Houston quarterback Matt Schaub
left against the St. Louis Rams in the
third quarter with an apparent right ankle
injury. Schaub was injured when he was
sacked by Chris Long late in the third
quarter. He remained on the turf for a few
minutes before trainers helped him as he
hobbled off the field.
Texans coach Gary Kubiak didnt have
many details on Schaubs injury after the
game, saying only: Matts got a little bit
of everything on that one leg.
Houston WR Keshawn Martin injured
a shoulder and safety Danieal Manning
damaged his right knee.
Cardinals defensive end Calais
Campbell was carted off the field at
San Francisco with an apparent right leg
injury. Campbell was hurt when his leg
buckled beneath him as he helped bring
down Frank Gore on a 1-yard gain late
in the game.
He left the field with movement and
the feeling was coming back, coach
Bruce Arians said. He had numbness. It
was precautionary (carting him off).
San Francisco lost nose tackle Glenn
Dorsey in the first quarter with a right
hamstring injury. He is the Niners sec-
ond injured nose tackle after starter Ian
Williams went down with a season-end-
ing broken ankle in a Week 2 loss at
Seattle.
The Vikings lost safety Harrison Smith
(turf toe, left foot), cornerback Xavier
Rhodes (sprained right ankle) and line-
backer Desmond Bishop (sprained right
knee) in their loss to Carolina. Theyll
have MRIs today.
Jets running backs Bilal Powell
(shoulder) and Mike Goodson (knee),
wide receiver Clyde Gates (shoulder),
and cornerback Kyle Wilson (head) all
left and didnt return in their loss to the
Steelers. Also in that game, Steelers TE
David Johnson left in the first quarter
with an injured left wrist and didnt
return.
The Oakland Raiders were running
out of offensive lineman after backup
center Andre Gurode and right tackle
Tony Pashos left their game against the
Chiefs. Gurode hurt his knee midway
through the second quarter. Pashos hurt
his groin late in the first half.
Kansas City also lost left tackle
Branden Albert with a bruised left knee.
The Broncos lost right tackle Orlando
Franklin to a left knee injury in the third
quarter of their win over Jacksonville. He
hobbled out of the locker room on a cane.
Jaguars receiver Cecil Shorts III left
in the first quarter with a right shoulder
injury.
Lions cornerback Rashean Mathis left
in the first half with a groin injury and
didnt return against the Browns.
Bills linebacker Manny Lawson left
the game against Cincinnati with a ham-
string injury in the first half.
Titans linebacker Moise Fokou left in
the fourth quarter at Seattle with a knee
sprain. Seattle DE Chris Clemons suf-
fered a hyperextended elbow late in the
game.
Packers lose WRs Cobb and Jones to injuries
Staffords TD passes lift
Lions past Browns 31-17
By TOM WITHERS
Associated Press
CLEVELAND The
scoreboard was lopsided. The
stat sheet looked worse.
And after Detroit quarter-
back Matthew Stafford and
the rest of the Lions dragged
themselves back to
the locker room at
halftime, there was
only one thing to do.
Press the reset
button, wide receiv-
er Kris Durham said.
Starting fresh
after being dominated by
Cleveland in the first half,
Stafford threw three of his
four touchdown passes after
halftime, rallying Detroit to a
31-17 win over the Browns on
Sunday.
The Lions (4-2) outscored
the Browns 24-0 in the sec-
ond half, sealing their win when
Stafford hooked up with rookie
tight end Joseph Fauria with
2:01 left. The 6-7 Fauria caught
three TD passes for the Lions,
who played like a completely
different team in the second
half after leaving the field down
17-7 and looking listless, life-
less and destined for a second
straight loss.
We werent playing our
best, Lions coach Jim Schwartz
said of his teams first-half
struggles. The players knew
it. We came out in the second
half and started to hit on all
cylinders.
The Browns (3-3) had their
chances at a comeback end
when quarterback Brandon
Weedens baffling shovel pass
with 4:36 left was intercepted
by Lions linebacker DeAndre
Levy.
Its a bone-headed play,
Weeden said.
Lions running back Reggie
Bush finished with 135 total
yards, 121 in the second half.
At halftime, Bush had touched
the ball just seven times. But
Stafford went to the versatile
back whenever he needed a big
play and Bush, taking advan-
tage of mismatches against
slower Cleveland linebackers,
had a 39-yard run in the third
and caught an 18-yard TD pass.
Stafford finished 25-of-43
for 248 yards. He completed
eight passes to Durham, who
took over as Detroits
primary target with
superstar Calvin
Johnson not himself
because of a balky
right knee. Johnson,
who missed last
weeks loss at Green
Bay, had just three catches for
25 yards, but the Browns were
forced to keep a watchful eye on
Megatron at all times.
Weeden, making his first
start since Week 2, finished
26-of-43 for 292 yards but
will be remembered for his ill-
advised pass when Cleveland
was driving for a possible tying
touchdown.
Trailing 24-17 and at
Detroits 44 with a first down,
Weeden was pressured by
defensive tackle C.J. Mosley,
who had his hand around the
quarterbacks left ankle. But
instead of throwing the ball
away or taking a sack, Weeden
tried to pitch the ball over full-
back Chris Ogbonnayas head
but it was picked off by Levy.
It was another poor decision
by Weeden, the second-year QB
thrust back into the lineup after
Brian Hoyer sustained a season-
ending knee injury on Oct. 3.
Stafford, on the other hand,
made all the right moves in the
second half. He was 15-of-21
for 165 yards and the three TDs
in the final 30 minutes.
At halftime, Lions coaches
had their say and Durham said
Stephen Tulloch addressed the
team.
He got up in front of us and
said a few words that he needed
to say like a team leader would,
Durham explained. I think it
got us fired up and ready to go
for the second half.
See NWC, page 8
Monday, October 14, 2013 The Herald 7
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McCleery scores four goals as Lady
Lancers take measure of Knights
JIM METCALFE
Staff Writer
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
ELIDA Junior Hannah McCleery
scored all four goals as Lincolnviews girls
soccer crew ousted Van Wert County rival
Crestview 4-0 in the opening match of the
Division III sectional at Elida Saturday.
Hannah dominated today. She did
everything; controlled the midfield, dis-
tributed the ball and scored, Lincolnview
coach Katrina Smith noted. Then Julia
made some outstanding saves; I dont
know where wed be without her, not only
today but all year. Shes been great in goal
all season.
Crestview coach Melissa Mefferd
agreed with those sentiments.
We lost Hannah a few too many times.
Shes a good player and when you lose
her defensively, she will beat you, she
explained. Thatcher was just too good in
goal. We had our chances but we couldnt
get anything past her.
The Lady Lancers (3-10-3) had the first
effort at 38:15 when sophomore Brooke
Schroeder got free from 10 yards but her
shot was just wide left.
They went up 1-0 at 33:23. McCleery
was open from 20 yards in the middle and
curled her shot into the left side of the net.
At 21:10, the Knights (1-13-2) were
called for handling in the box and
McCleery took the penalty kick, going
hard and to the left past Lady Knight
sophomore netminder Alyssa Walter (7
saves vs. 11 shots on-goal).
The Lancers had a number of oppor-
tunities the rest of the half but couldnt
find the target or Walter came up with the
saves.
The Knights started to generate some
offense in the last half of the opening 40
minutes.
Their first prime shot came at 14:04
when senior Brooke Bowen fired a 16-yard
laser that forced a diving deflection by
Lancer junior keeper Julia Thatcher (9
saves vs. 9 shots).
She had two more saves: at 9:06 on a
16-yarder by Bowen; and at 36 seconds
when she denied a 30-yarder by Riley
Guest.
Lincolnview made it 3-0 at 37:48.
McCleery got free from 14 yards on the
right wing and went to the opposite side.
At 35:50, sophomore Savannah
Bigham fired a 12-yarder that Walter
deflected away.
Just 50 seconds later, though, she could
not deny McCleerys fourth tally. On a
beautifully lofted corner kick from the left
side by Schroeder, McCleery was on the
doorstep of the right post and headed in
the 6-yarder.
The Lady Knights again started to get
some offense going the rest of the way.
At 22:00, Guest had a free kick from
24 yards that got through the 4-person
wall and forced a diving deflection by
Thatcher; Jamie Moore had a point-blank
putback from the left post that Thatcher
again denied.
Thatcher again was big at 20:54 when
she knocked away a 12-yard blast from
Moore.
She preserved the shutout the rest of
the way, with the best Crestview effort at
5:40 when she slapped away a 12-yarder
by Bowen; Moores follow shot was just
off the mark.
We had tied Crestview 1-1 early in the
season but that was a while ago; we hadnt
see them in a while, Smith added. Our
defense played well overall, especially as
Crestview started to put an attack together.
We executed our game plan. We just have
to play like we did today Wednesday
against LCC; we lost to them in the regu-
lar season.
Mefferd has to say goodbye to seven
seniors out of her roster of 19.
Its always emotional to see your
seniors play their final matches, she
added. They are good leaders and
good athletes. It was a frustrating
year with injuries and such and these
girls never had a bad attitude; they
kept battling and for that, Im proud
of them.
Lincolnview plays top seed Lima
Central Catholic at 5 p.m. Wednesday.
Lincolnview junior Hannah McCleery challenges Crestview senior Riley Guest
during soccer action Saturday at Elida. McCleery scored all four goals as the
Lady Lancers ousted the Knights. (Delphos Herald/Jim Metcalfe)
Bengals beat Bills 27-24
on Nugents OT field goal
By JOHN WAWROW
Associatd Press
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. No stranger to criticism,
Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton was able to offer Mike
Nugent some advice once it became apparent how costly the
kickers missed field goal was.
I told him, Youre going to kick a field goal to win the
game, Dalton recalled when the Buffalo Bills scored to force
overtime. Just be ready.
Nugent delivered, hitting a 43-yarder with 6:44 left in over-
time to seal a 27-24 win over Buffalo on Sunday. Nugent redis-
covered his aim after missing a 34-yard attempt wide right that
would have put the Bengals up 27-10 late in the third quarter.
And Dalton showed an ability to bounce back as well.
Ending a 2-game touchdown drought, Dalton silenced his
doubters by going 26-of-40 for 337 yards and three touch-
downs.
It shows what we can do on offense, Dalton said.
Hopefully, there will be some positive stuff written about us.
The three touchdowns an 18-yarder to A.J. Green, a
20-yard shovel pass to Giovani Bernard and a 10-yarder to
Marvin Jones matched Daltons career best for a road game.
And his 337 yards passing were the third most of his career.
Nugent was also relieved to have a second chance.
I feel like I put us in overtime in a bad way, obviously,
Nugent said. I just hit it terrible. I think I was lucky that we
could get back in a position to win.
He got help from Brandon Tate, whose 29-yard punt return
to the Bills 33 set up the decisive score. Cincinnati (4-2)
improved to 16-11-1 in overtime games and snapped a 6-game
losing streak at Orchard Park, dating to 1985.
The Bills (2-4) lost despite a gutty outing from quarterback
Thad Lewis, who started in place of injured rookie EJ Manuel.
Lewis went 19-of-32 for 216 yards and two touchdowns in
only his second career start after being promoted from the
practice squad last week.
I think I did OK. But its never good when you dont come
out with that W, Lewis said. Youve got to be confident in
this league. If I was nervous in any way, shape, form or fash-
ion, the Bengals wouldve ate us up.
Lewis, who also scored on a 3-yard run, showed no signs of
wavering after he lost a fumble to open the third quarter that
led to Jones touchdown. And Lewis didnt seem bothered by
ending the game playing on a sore right ankle, telling reporters
he was diagnosed with a sprained foot and expects to play next
week at Miami.
If he cant, the Bills would have to turn to another practice
squad player, Dennis Dixon, who was signed Tuesday. Buffalo
has only one other quarterback on its roster, undrafted rookie
Jeff Tuel, who struggled filling in for Manuel in a 37-24 loss
at Cleveland.
The young and rebuilding Bills have remained competitive.
Their four losses have been decided by a combined 25 points.
Weve lost a lot of close games and that hurts, center Eric
Wood said. It stings that were so close and we could be on
the other end of some of these games. You wish you could go
back and change something but you cant.
Lewis produced a near-stunning comeback in rallying the
Bills from a 14-point fourth-quarter deficit.
The comeback began five minutes into the fourth quarter,
when Lewis found tight end Scott Chandler for a 22-yard
touchdown pass on fourth-and-8.
His next touchdown pass was equally impressive. After hit-
ting Chandler for a 25-yard gain over the middle, Lewis con-
nected with Goodwin on the run in the end zone, a step ahead
of cornerback Terence Newman.
It was an unlikely performance by a relative unknown
at quarterback against a defense that ended Tom Bradys
consecutive-game touchdown streak at 52 in 13-6 win over
New England last weekend. In its three previous wins this
season, Cincinnatis defense limited Brady, Green Bays Aaron
Rodgers and Pittsburghs Ben Roethlisberger to a combined
64-of-118 for 692 yards, with two touchdowns and four inter-
ceptions.
It aint always pretty but Ill take a win any day of the
week, Newman added.
NOTES: Bills WR Stevie Johnson (back injury) did not
play. After managing just 22 catches for 199 yards and a
TD in his past four games, Green finished with six catches for
103 yards and a score. Bengals DE Carlos Dunlap had one
of the teams five sacks and forced a fumble.
Ramirezs status uncertain for Dodgers in NLCS
By BETH HARRIS
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES The
Dodgers offense is struggling
and they might have to face St.
Louis ace Adam Wainwright
without their top hitter in Game
3 of the NL Championship
Series.
Shortstop Hanley Ramirez
had a CT scan on his pain-
ful left ribs Sunday and the
results werent available by
mid-afternoon. He got hit by
a pitch from Joe Kelly in the
opener but stayed in to play all
13 innings of a 3-2 loss Friday.
Ramirez was a late scratch
for Game 2, a 1-0 defeat that
left Los Angeles trailing the
Cardinals 2-0 in the best-of-7
series.
He rested Sunday, along
with the rest of the team, which
didnt hit on the field.
Were just working on
that, taking the pain away so
I can go, Ramirez said. Even
if its cracked or something,
Im going to be able to get out
there if we can take the pain
away. It feels the same but that
doesnt stop me from trying to
remain positive for tomorrow.
Ramirez had a .638 slug-
ging percentage during the
regular season and the Dodgers
desperately need an offensive
boost to get back into the best-
of-7 series. They batted .184 in
the first two games on the road,
including 1-for-16 (.063) with
runners in scoring position.
Weve talked about it. It
always comes back to, can
you get that key out and can
you get the key hit? man-
ager Don Mattingly asked. It
doesnt get any easier for us
with Wainwright. He seems
like hes always coming up
big.
Dodgers outfielder Andre
Ethier didnt start Saturday
but he appeared as a pinch-
hitter and ended the game
with a strikeout. Hes been
bothered by shin splints,
although he made his first
start since Sept. 13 in the
series opener.
Its definitely a thing
where we need all the hands
we can to find a way to get
back in the series, Ethier said.
Wainwright predicted both
Ramirez and Ethier would
play.
He looks the best Ive
seen him in a long time,
Wainwright explained of
Ramirez. His swing looks
great. His approach is awe-
some. As everyone knows,
hes got power to all fields, so
hes a very dangerous hitter
and a very tough bat added to
that lineup.
Dodgers rookie Yasiel Puig
has yet to make an impact in
the series. Hitting cleanup in
place of Ramirez, Puig struck
out four times Saturday, drop-
ping to 0-for-10 with six
strikeouts in the series.
He is a positive kid and
he told me, Im going to
get it tomorrow, Ramirez
recalled. Tomorrow hes
going to come and get ready
to play and hes going to do
some damage.
The lack of offense and
injuries to key players recalls
the early-season version of
the Dodgers, when they were
mired in the NL West cel-
lar and were 12 games under
.500. Then Puig arrived in
early June and sparked their
revival.
The Dodgers couldnt
capitalize on stellar outings
by Zack Greinke and Clayton
Kershaw on the road and now
must rely on rookie Hyun-Jin
Ryu, who stumbled against
Atlanta in his playoff debut in
the division series. He allowed
four runs and six hits in three
innings and made two major
mistakes in the field.
I feel really strong, Ryu
said through a Korean transla-
tor. There is no reason my
arm isnt in good, top shape
right now.
Wainwright last pitched
against Los Angeles in the
postseason in the 2009 NL
division series, allowing one
earned run in eight innings of
a no-decision. He left leading
2-1 before the Dodgers scored
twice in the bottom of the
ninth to win.
Thinking back, I know its
going to be rocking tomor-
row, Wainwright added. I
dont know how many people
are here but its a lot of fans,
bigger than most stadiums and
very loud. I love that, though.
The louder the better. That
plays right into my hands.
The Cardinals went
through a full workout on a
sunny and cool day at Dodger
Stadium.
Manager Mike Matheny
said his teams mentality has
stayed the same throughout
the season.
Weve had some brutal
losses and the guys came
back the next day like it never
happened. Weve had some
exciting wins and weve come
back the next day with a lot
of hunger, he added. Thats
what we continue to preach.
That consistency is really in
my mind what separates the
good players from the very
good players and the good
teams from the very good
teams.
The Dodgers have been
down before in best-of-7 post-
season series and come back.
Three times theyve trailed
2-0 in the World Series, most
recently against the New York
Yankees in 1981, and rallied
to win titles each time.
This team has been count-
ed out a lot of times this year,
Ethier added. We figured
out a way to get it done. We
definitely have it in ourselves.
Weve proved that.
Kenyans Kimetto, Jeptoo
win Chicago Marathon
ANDREW SELIGMAN
Associated Press
CHICAGO Just a few
years ago, Dennis Kimetto was
a farmer, tending corn and cattle
in Kenya. Now, hes shattering
marathon records.
Six weeks removed from a
bout of malaria, Kimetto broke
the course mark Sunday in cap-
turing the Chicago Marathon.
Compatriot Rita Jeptoo was the
womens winner in the first major
marathon in the United States
since the Boston bombings.
Kimetto finished in 2 hours,
3 minutes, 45 seconds, leading
a 1-2-3 finish for Kenyan men.
He beat the mark of 2:04:38 set
by Ethiopias Tsegaye Kebede
last year. He pulled away from
Emannuel Mutai over the last
few miles and was alone with
both arms raised as he crossed
the line.
It was his second major vic-
tory this year to go with a win
at Tokyo in February not
bad for someone who not long
ago was working the land in the
west Kenyan town of Eldoret.
He said through an interpret-
er that he had been running on
his own when he had a chance
meeting with Geoffrey Mutai,
a star marathoner and fellow
Kenyan. Mutai asked Kimetto
to join his camp near Eldoret
and train with him.
Kimetto finished second in
his marathon debut in Berlin last
year, won Tokyo and added to
his status as one of the worlds
best on Sunday.
Before the race, there was a
30-second moment of silence to
honor the victims of the Boston
Marathon bombings.
Mutai (2:03:52), the 2011
London winner, also beat
Kebedes time but finished
seven seconds off the lead.
Sammy Kitwara (2:05:16) was
third.
Jeptoo followed her victory
at Boston by easily taking her
race, finishing in 2:19:57 after
losing in a sprint a year ago.
There was no one near Jeptoo
as she turned into Grant Park,
wearing a wide grin and waving
to the crowd.
Jemima Sumgong Jelegat of
Kenya (2:20:48) was second,
followed by Maria Konovalova
of Russia (2:22:46).
The winners each earned
$100,000. Kimetto gets an addi-
tional $75,000 for the course
record, while Jeptoo gets anoth-
er $40,000 for finishing under
2:20:00.
On a sunny day and with
conditions ideal, the race drew
a Chicago Marathon-record
40,230 runners. But there was a
different feel to this event in the
aftermath of Boston, where the
bombings killed three people
and injured more than 260 oth-
ers.
Its a testimony to what the
marathon is about and what the
people who participate in the
marathon are about, executive
race director Carey Pinkowski
said. Theyre dedicated and
focused and committed. The
marathons a celebration of
humanity. This is an example of
that. I thought everything went
really, really smooth. I think the
key to that was the messaging
to our participants, to our volun-
teers. We asked our participants
to get there a little bit earlier.
Walker wins on PGA Tour
and gets trip to Masters
Associated Press
SAN MARTIN, Calif. Jimmy Walker finally won on the
PGA Tour in his eighth year and 188th tournament, with a little
help from Brooks Koepka.
Tied for the lead with four holes to play Sunday, Walker
rolled in a 6-foot birdie putt on the 15th hole to take the
lead for good in the Frys.com Open. Three closing pars for a
5-under 66 turned out to be more than enough for the 34-year-
old Texan to take home a trophy and plenty of perks.
Walker is going to the Masters for the first time, along with
a trip to Maui for the Tournament of Championship. He also
cracked the top 50 for the first time in his career.
I think it will sink in after a while, Walker said. Relief
right now. It feels really good. Im pretty excited.
It was a sinking feeling for Koepka, whose journey around
the world in a remarkable year nearly ended with a PGA Tour
card.
Koepka had a 4-shot lead with 11 holes to play and the
23-year-old Floridian looked as poised and confident as he had
all week at CordeValle. There was a tiny crack when he missed
a 3-foot par putt on the ninth hole and it really caught up with
him at the end.
See MARATHON,
page 8
See GOLF, page 8
8 The Herald Monday, October 14, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
(Continued from page 7)
Police promised height-
ened security. More than
a thousand uniformed and
undercover officers as well
as bomb-sniffing dogs
were to mix with the crowd
along a course winding
through 29 neighborhoods.
Officers inside a command
post monitored pictures
from helicopters and the
citys 22,000 cameras, the
most extensive surveillance
system in the nation.
The Department of
Homeland Security desig-
nated the marathon a level
two event, a notch below
massive gatherings such
as the Super Bowl. That
meant more federal agents
with high-tech monitoring
equipment.
Runners could use only
clear plastic bags issued
by organizers to store their
belongings near the fin-
ish line. They had to pick
up their own packets, with
race bibs and tracking
devices, rather than friends
or family.
Ernst Van Dyk of South
Africa won the mens
wheelchair division race in
1:30:37. Tatyana McFadden
of Champaign, Ill., won
the womens division in a
course record 1:42:35.
McFadden, who also
won the Boston and London
marathons this year, will
attempt a Grand Slam in
wheelchair racing at the
New York City Marathon
next month.
Kimetto and Mutai start-
ed to surge ahead around
the 19th mile, only to have
fellow Kenyans Sammy
Kitwara and Micah Kogo
stay with them. Those
two faded after the group
passed through Chinatown.
The gap between
Kimetto and Mutai start-
ed to widen after Mutai
missed his bottle at a water
station around the 24-mile
mark, although Mutai said
that was a not an issue.
Kimetto wasnt aware it
happened.
Either way, he took
control over the last few
miles. The world record of
2:03:23 was in sight, set by
Wilson Kipsang of Kenya
in Berlin two weeks ago.
But Kimetto had to settle
for the course mark.
Jeptoo had an easier fin-
ish. Last year, she traded
leads with Atsede Baysa of
Ethiopia down the stretch
and lost a step. Six months
later, Jeptoo won her sec-
ond Boston Marathon, a
victory overshadowed by
tragedy.
This time, she had a big
smile and waved to the
crowd on her way to the
finish.
(Continued from page 7)
Koepka missed a 6-foot putt on the 15th that would have
matched birdies with Walker, who was playing in the group
ahead of him. Koepka then missed his tee shot wildly to the
left on the 16th hole and had to scramble for bogey. Down to
his last shot, he hit into the water on the 297-yard, par-4 17th
for another bogey.
Things werent going my way, Koepka said. I didnt
make the shots I needed to win. Congrats to Jimmy on that.
Ill try to learn from the whole experience.
Vijay Singh closed with a 68 and wound up with the 27th
runner-up finish of his Hall-of-Fame career, his best result
since he sued the PGA Tour in May over its handling of the
investigation into Singh admitting he used deer antler spray.
Koepka, who closed with a 72, wound up in a tie for third
with Kevin Na, Puerto Rico winner Scott Brown and Hideki
Matsuyama, the 21-year-old Japanese star who is playing the
PGA Tour for the first time. He was in the Presidents Cup last
week.
The Frys.com Open is the season opener in the new PGA
Tour schedule, which starts in October instead of January for
the first time in history. Instead of a Fall Series event where
players mainly were trying to make money to keep their cards,
the tournament offered all the perks of any other regular PGA
Tour event.
That much was evident when a yellow Masters flag was
stuffed into the silver trophy.
Walker played Augusta National for the first time about
five years ago with his dad and a member. He cant wait to go
back for the Masters.
Koepka was playing on a sponsors exemption that he
received without asking tournament officials identified him
as a potential star when he started the year with no status on
any tour and won three times on the Challenge Tour to earn
his European Tour card. He qualified for the British Open the
day after his third Challenge Tour win.
He was between stops in Scotland and Shanghai and now
his plans are slightly altered. Koepkas finish gets him into Las
Vegas next week before he goes back to the European Tour for
the BMW Masters in China.
Billy Hurley III closed with a 68 and NCAA champion
Max Homa from Cal birdied two of the last three holes to tie
for ninth. That gets them in Las Vegas.
Koepka won all of his Challenge Tour events in Europe
with the 54-hole lead, experience he figured could only help.
For eight holes, he was on the verge of running away from the
field. Koepka rammed in a 45-foot birdie putt on the sixth hole
to reach 17 under, and when Singh in group ahead 3-putted the
seventh for bogey from about the same range, the Floridian
had a 4-shot lead.
It was gone in four holes.
Koepka had about a 15-foot birdie putt from the collar of
the par-5 ninth green that went about 3 feet by the hole. But
the stroke on his par putt looked a little quick, and it caught
the left lip and spun out for a bogey. On the par-3 11th, he
pulled a 6-foot par putt. That dropped him into a tie for the
lead with Walker, who was in the group ahead and had made
a 15-foot birdie on the eighth and a two-putt birdie from long
range on the ninth.
They traded birdies Koepka with a 3-footer on the par-5
12th, Walker with a 30-foot putt from the fringe on the 13th,
setting the stage for the decisive stretch at CordeValle a par
5 that could be reached in two, the par-4 17th that played 297
yards over the water, and a closing hole that required only a
flip wedge with a big drive.
And thats where it was decided.
LEGENDS TOUR
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Jan Stephenson made a 30-foot
birdie putt for the deciding points Sunday in the World teams
first victory in the Legends Tours ISPS Handa Cup.
Stephenson shot a 1-under 71 to edge Sherri Turner by a
stroke and the World team went on to beat the United States
27-21 in the 45-and-older competition at Hermitage Golf
Club. The Americans won the event the first six times and
retained the cup last year with a tie in Orlando, Fla.
It took a few years for the World team to practice and get
better and better and better, World captain Pia Nilsson said.
We were a team this week and the passion was so strong. This
is just going to make this competition even better, to grow in
the future.
JoAnne Carner captained the U.S. team.
You hate to lose but the way the World team played this
week I have no repercussions, whatsoever, Carner said.
They just outplayed us.
Associated Press
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. Tom
Bradys 17-yard touchdown pass to
Kenbrell Thompkins with 5 seconds
left gave the New England Patriots a
wild 30-27 win and knocked the New
Orleans Saints from the ranks of the
unbeaten Sunday.
It capped a 70-yard drive in which
the Patriots marched downfield with
no timeouts after getting the ball with
1:08 to go.
The Saints (5-1) had taken a 24-23
lead with 3:29 remaining on Drew
Brees 34-yard touchdown pass to
Kenny Stills but couldnt put away
New England.
The Patriots (5-1) survived an inter-
ception by Keenan Lewis on their first
snap after Garrett Hartleys 39-yard
field goal made it 27-23.
PACKERS 19, RAVENS 17
BALTIMORE Aaron Rodgers
threw a 64-yard touchdown pass to
Jordy Nelson, Mason Crosby kicked
four field goals and Green Bay held on
to beat Baltimore.
Eddie Lacy rushed for 120 yards to
fuel the Packers first road win of the
season. Green Bay (3-2) took a 16-3
lead into the fourth quarter and was
up 19-10 with 4 minutes left but the
Ravens (3-3) kept coming back.
After Baltimore closed to 19-17
on an 18-yard touchdown pass from
Joe Flacco to Dallas Clark with 2:04
remaining, Rodgers clinched the vic-
tory with a 52-yard completion to
Jermichael Finley on a third-and-3.
Rodgers went 17-for-32 for 315
yards.
Despite playing without injured
linebacker Clay Matthews, the Packers
limited Baltimore to 47 yards rushing
and registered five sacks, including
three by A.J. Hawk.
The defending Super Bowl champi-
on Ravens had won 13 straight at home
against NFC foes.
BRONCOS 35, JAGUARS 19
DENVER Peyton Manning threw
for two scores and Knowshon Moreno
ran for three to lead Denver to a tough-
er-than-expected victory over winless
Jacksonville.
The Broncos (6-0) came in as
27-point favorites and much of the pre-
game hype centered on whether theyd
cover the spread and when Manning
would come out of the game.
Neither happened.
Manning finished 28-for-42 for 295
yards but lost two fumbles and threw
a pick-6 a 59-yard interception
return by Paul Posluszny that pulled the
Jaguars (0-6) within 14-12 at halftime.
It was a 2-point game late in the
third quarter, before Moreno scored
his last touchdown, an 8-yard run, for
a 28-19 lead. Moreno finished with 42
yards.
Justin Blackmon had 14 catches for
190 yards for Jacksonville.
CHIEFS 24, RAIDERS 7
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Jamaal
Charles ran for two touchdowns, the
Kansas City defense harassed Oakland
quarterback Terrelle Pryor into throw-
ing three second-half interceptions and
the Chiefs remained unbeaten.
After winning just twice last sea-
son, Kansas City (6-0) continued the
second-best start in franchise history.
The Chiefs won their first nine games
during the 2003 season.
The Chiefs piled up 10 sacks while
ending a 3-game skid to the Raiders
(2-4) and a 6-game losing streak against
them at Arrowhead Stadium.
Pryor threw for 216 yards and a
touchdown but his interceptions proved
costly.
The first led to Charles go-ahead
touchdown run, the second led to Ryan
Succops fourth-quarter field goal and
Husain Abdullah returned the last one
for a touchdown to seal the win.
STEELERS 19, JETS 6
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
Ben Roethlisberger threw a 55-yard
touchdown pass to Emmanuel Sanders,
Shaun Suisham kicked four field goals
and Pittsburgh won its first game of the
season.
The Steelers (1-4) were off to their
worst start since 1968, when they lost
their first six games during a season in
which they finished 2-11-1. Sundays
victory was also the 600th in franchise
history, including the postseason, as
Pittsburgh became only the fourth team
to reach the milestone.
Pittsburgh was coming off a bye-
week break and appeared quite a bit
sharper than New York (3-3), which
had a short week to prepare after a
30-28 win at Atlanta last Monday night.
Geno Smith was intercepted twice
by a Steelers defense that entered the
game as the only team in the league
without a takeaway.
PANTHERS 35, VIKINGS 10
MINNEAPOLIS Cam Newton
threw three touchdown passes and ran
for another score and Carolina romped
past Adrian Peterson and Minnesota.
Peterson finished with 62 yards on
10 carries and 21 yards on three recep-
tions but the Vikings (1-4) trailed the
whole game and didnt have much use
after halftime for Peterson. The NFL
MVP learned Friday that a 2-year-old
son of his died in South Dakota of inju-
ries from alleged abuse.
Matt Cassel threw two interceptions,
both to Mike Mitchell, and the Panthers
(2-3) responded each time with a touch-
down.
Whether the team was distracted by
the tragedy or not, the Vikings were
thoroughly embarrassed on both sides
of the ball.
49ERS 32, CARDINALS 20
SAN FRANCISCO Vernon Davis
caught touchdown passes of 61 and
35 yards and finished with a career-
best 180 yards receiving, leading San
Francisco to its third straight victory.
Colin Kaepernick threw for 252
yards and Frank Gore ran for 101 yards
on 25 carries.
Kendall Hunter ran for a 6-yard
touchdown that sealed it for the 49ers
(4-2) with 6:35 remaining.
Rookie safety Eric Reid made his
team-leading third interception and
also recovered a fumble to stop an
Arizona drive deep in 49ers territory in
the third quarter. San Francisco forced
four turnovers for the second straight
game.
Arizona (3-3) lost star defensive end
Calais Campbell to an apparent right
leg injury late in the game.
RAMS 38, TEXANS 13
HOUSTON Sam Bradford threw
three touchdown passes, St. Louis
added a score on defense and special
teams and the Rams stunned mistake-
prone Houston.
The Rams (3-3) were up 24-6 early
in the third quarter before rookie Daren
Bates returned Keshawn Martins fum-
ble on a kickoff return for a touchdown.
Alec Ogletree pushed the lead to
38-6 when he took an interception by
T.J. Yates back 98 yards for a touch-
down. Yates was in after Matt Schaub
sustained an apparent right ankle injury.
Schaub didnt have a turnover after
throwing six interceptions, three of
them returned for touchdowns in the
past three games.
But several other Texans had key
gaffes as preseason Super Bowl hope-
ful Houston (2-4) lost its fourth straight
game.
SEAHAWKS 20, TITANS 13
SEATTLE Marshawn Lynch
ran for two touchdowns and had 155
all-purpose yards, Richard Sherman
came up with his third interception of
the season and Seattle finally shook
Tennessee in the fourth quarter.
Seattle (5-1) won its 11th straight at
home despite a long list of mistakes that
allowed the Titans (3-3) to hang around
into the fourth. There was a careless
turnover, missed defensive assignments
and a comical muffed field goal attempt
that led to the Titans only touchdown
on the final play of the first half.
But the Seahawks made enough
plays thanks to Lynch, quarterback
Russell Wilson and Shermans inter-
ception to remain on top of the NFC
West. Lynch had TD runs of 3 yards
and 1 yard.
EAGLES 31, BUCCANEERS 20
TAMPA, Fla. Nick Foles threw
three touchdown passes and ran for a
fourth, leading Philadelphia over win-
less Tampa Bay.
Foles finished a long first-quarter
scoring drive with a 4-yard run and
threw TD passes of 12 and 36 yards to
DeSean Jackson.
With the injured Michael Vick active
but not playing, Foles made his seventh
career start and beat the Bucs (0-5) for
the second time. He was 1-5 as a rookie
a year ago, with that victory also com-
ing at Tampa Bay.
But unlike last December, he didnt
have to throw a last-second TD pass for
the win. He gave the Eagles (3-3) the
lead for good with a 47-yard scoring
pass to Riley Cooper in the third quar-
ter, then gave his team breathing room
with his second TD pass to Jackson.
NFL Capsules
Golf
Marathon
NFL Glance
Associated Press
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.England 5 1 0 .833 125 97
Miami 3 2 0 .600 114 117
N.Y. Jets 3 3 0 .500 104 135
Buffalo 2 4 0 .333 136 157
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 4 1 0 .800 139 79
Tennessee 3 3 0 .500 128 115
Houston 2 4 0 .333 106 177
Jacksonville 0 6 0 .000 70 198
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 4 2 0 .667 121 111
Baltimore 3 3 0 .500 134 129
Cleveland 3 3 0 .500 118 125
Pittsburgh 1 4 0 .200 88 116
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 6 0 0 1.000 152 65
Denver 6 0 0 1.000 265 158
San Diego 2 3 0 .400 125 129
Oakland 2 4 0 .333 105 132
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 166 179
Dallas 2 3 0 .400 152 136
Washington 1 3 0 .250 91 112
N.Y. Giants 0 6 0 .000 103 209
South
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Orleans 5 1 0 .833 161 103
Carolina 2 3 0 .400 109 68
Atlanta 1 4 0 .200 122 134
Tampa Bay 0 5 0 .000 64 101
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 4 2 0 .667 162 140
Chicago 4 2 0 .667 172 161
Green Bay 3 2 0 .600 137 114
Minnesota 1 4 0 .200 125 158
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 5 1 0 .833 157 94
San Fran 4 2 0 .667 145 118
St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 141 154
Arizona 3 3 0 .500 111 127
___
Thursdays Result
Chicago 27, N.Y. Giants 21
Sundays Results
Carolina 35, Minnesota 10
Kansas City 24, Oakland 7
St. Louis 38, Houston 13
Green Bay 19, Baltimore 17
Philadelphia 31, Tampa Bay 20
Pittsburgh 19, N.Y. Jets 6
Cincinnati 27, Buffalo 24, OT
Detroit 31, Cleveland 17
Seattle 20, Tennessee 13
Denver 35, Jacksonville 19
San Francisco 32, Arizona 20
New England 30, New Orleans 27
Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Miami
Todays Game
Indianapolis at San Diego, 8:40 p
NWC
(Continued from page 6)
Mycah struggled with a knee injury earlier this season but
he seems to be rounding into form. He ran a great race; he had
to because of the two great competitors he beat, Bagley added.
So much of cross country is maintaining a mental edge and
the confidence to know you have worked hard enough and can
get the job done. As coaches will tell you, you have to know
when to push and when to give them a break. Fortunately, I
have a group of kids that really love to run.
For the Bearcats, Thad Ringwald was 19th (18:36) and Matt
Hurles was 35th (19:41).
McMichael shared a familiar lament.
We are a bit short-handed today with an injury or two
to 0ur top five. That being said, we did a nice job as a team
despite that, he added. All you really look for each meet is
to see how much better your kids are from the previous week;
you want to make constant improvement and you train for this
time of year; the league meets and the post-season. We have to
get ready for Districts this week and hope we can do better.
The District meet is Saturday at Ottawas Memorial Park.
2
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
419-692-0055
www.raabeford.com
GREVE
CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE RAM
Visit our website: www.grevechrysler.com
756 W. Ervin Rd. Van Wert
888-590-1685
24 month lease
10,000 miles per year
MSRP $37,500
$327 due at signing
2014 Ram 1500
Crew Cab Express
4x4 (25C)
$
327
+tax per mo.
N
e
w
Great
Service!
Thats what you get
from Delphos Herald
Advertisers.
Monday, October 14, 2013 The Herald 9 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next days issue.
Saturdays paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Mondays paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
DAYS PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
LLC
Brent Day
567-204-8488
Mowing
Landscaping
Lawn Seeding
SAFE &
SOUND
Security Fence
DELPHOS
SELF-STORAGE
Pass Code Lighted Lot
Affordable 2 Locations
Why settle for less?
419-692-6336
GESSNERS
PRODUCE
NEW FALL HOURS
7 DAYS A WEEK
11:30AM-4:30PM
9557 St. Rt. 66, Delphos, OH 45833
419-692-5749 419-234-6626
AVAILABLE NOW!
OHIO SWEET CORN
CIDER, APPLES
PA PEACHES, MUMS
PUMPKINS &
TOMATOES
Tree Service
L.L.C.
Trimming & Removal
Stump Grinding
24 Hour Service Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
TEMANS
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
Trimming Topping Thinning
Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Joe Miller
Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry
Roofing, remodeling,
concrete, pole barns, garages
or any construction needs.
Cell 567-644-6030
Home Improvement
Harrison
Floor Installation
Carpet, Vinyl, Wood,
Ceramic Tile
Reasonable rates
Free estimates
harrisonfoorinstallation.com
Phil 419-235-2262
Wes 567-644-9871
You buy, we apply
CALL
419-991-4400
For appointment time.
interior design service
furniture rugs accessories
custom draperies
Deborah Miller Kelley Balyeat
CALLDEB
419-991-4400
For appointment time.
interior design service
furniture rugs accessories
custom draperies
1747Allentown Rd. Lima, OH45805
Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arbys
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES SIDING ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
Agricultural Needs
All Concrete Work
Concrete leveling of
floors, sidewalks,
patios, steps, driveways,
pool decks, etc.
Call Dave cell
419-236-1496
419-692-5143
home/office
Mike
419-235-1067
U
N
E
V
E
N
C
O
N
C
R
E
T
E
?
VONDERWELL
CONTRACTING
CONCRETE
LEVELING
WORK
WANTED
Any
Carpentry Framing
Siding Roofng
Pole Barns
Any repair work
FREE ESTIMATES
30 years experience!
419-733-6309
Hohlbeins
Ph. 419-339-4938
or 419-230-8128
Home
Improvement
Windows,
Doors, Siding,
Roofing,
Sunrooms,
Pole Buildings,
Garages
Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
automatic transmission
standard transmission
differentials
transfer case
brakes & tune up
Construction
T S B
Construction
BUILDING &
REMODELING
419-235-2631
Roofng, Garages, Room
Additions, Bathrooms,
Kitchens, Siding, Decks,
Pole Barns, Windows.
30 Years Experience
Is your ad here?
Call today!
419-695-0015
Newspapers provide a daily source of information
from around the globe. Expand your horizons.
Subscribe today!
The Delphos Herald ... 419-695-0015
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Sales Representative Position
Times Bulletin Media is searching for a
full-time sales representative. If you appreciate
working as part of a team, enjoy working with
businesses large and small, thrive in a busy
and creative environment, and love using the
web and social media sites, this position may
be a perfect match for you.
Candidates who succeed in sales
possess above average written and oral
communications skills, work with multiple
deadlines and projects, and demonstrate
effective organizational, time management,
and planning skills.
The successful applicant will learn and
work with Times Bulletin Medias many
products. Applicants must demonstrate a
working knowledge of the internet and active
participation in social networking and media.
The successful candidate will play a key role in
developing the companys online campaigns
and social media strategies.
We pay our sales representatives using
a draw and commission plan. The parent
company offers a full schedule of benefts
including Health Insurance, 401K and Vacation.
We are an equal opportunity employer.
For consideration, please forward a
professional resume and cover letter detailing
how you will apply your skills and experience to
the marketplace. Incomplete applications will
not be considered.
Mail to: Kirk Dougal, Publisher
P.O. Box 271, Van Wert, Ohio 45891
E-mail to kdougal@timesbulletin.com
Or deliver to The Times Bulletin Media offce:
700 Fox Road, Van Wert, Ohio
00070858
Schrader
realty llc
Put your dreams in our hands
www.schraderrealty.net
VIEW ALL LISTINGS AND PICTURES ON OUR WEBSITE:
202 N. Washington Street
Delphos, OH 45833
Office: 419-692-2249
Fax: 419-692-2205
Custom built county home with up to 6 bedrooms total including finished
basement. On 1.99 country acre lot with heated in ground pool. A must
see custom kitchen! Tilt out windows throughout. Full finished basement
with second kitchen, family room & more! 3 bedrooms on main floor and 3
bedrooms down. 2112 Sq ft on main level plus additional 2112 in finished
basement! Double ovens and porcelain sinks. Large walk in closets. Call
Lynn Claypool 419-234-2314.
24597
Carpenter Road
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, OCT. 20
12:00-2:00 P.M.
Brock Grain Systems
B & S Millwright 419.795.1403
Bucket
Elevators
Dump Pits
Dryers
Brock Grain Systems
Bucket
Elevators
Dump Pits
Dryers
dhi
MEDIA
dhi Media is searching for a full-time sales
representative. If you appreciate working as part
of a team, enjoy working with businesses large and
small, thrive in a busy and creative environment,
and love using the web and social media sites, this
position may be a perfect match for you.
Candidates who succeed in sales possess above
average written and oral communications skills,
work with multiple deadlines and projects and
demonstrate effective organizational, time man-
agement and planning skills.
The successful applicant will learn and work with
dhi Medias many products. Applicants must dem-
onstrate a working knowledge of the internet and
active participation in social networking and media.
The successful candidate will play a key role in
developing the companys online campaigns and
social media strategies.
We pay our sales representatives using a draw
and commission plan. The parent company offers
a full schedule of benefts including Health Insur-
ance, 401K and vacation. We are an equal oppor-
tunity employer.
For consideration, please forward a professional
resume and cover letter detailing how you will ap-
ply your skills and experience to the marketplace.
Incomplete applications will not be considered.
Mail to: Don Hemple, Advertising Manager
405 N. Main Street, Delphos, Ohio 45833
E-mail to dhemple@delphosherald.com
Or deliver to 405 N. Main Street, Delphos, Ohio
Sales Representative Position
Engineering position available at
Baughman Tile Company, a leading plastic
pipe manufacturer in the Midwest. Ideal
candidate will be experienced in AutoCad,
Microsoft Offce, thermodynamics & plastic
processing with a strong aptitude in the
mechanical and electrical felds.
Must have excellent leadership,
communication & organizational skills, be
detail oriented and have the ability
to multi-task. Bachelor of Science in
Mechanical or Electrical Engineering or 10+
years of documented engineering experience
in an industrial facility required.
Agricultural experience or background is a
plus. Please send resume and salary
requirements to careers@baughmantile.com
105 Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU
can place a 25 word
classified ad in more
than 100 newspapers
with over one and a half
million total circulation
across Ohio for $295. Its
easy...you place one or-
der and pay with one
check through Ohio
Scan-Ohio Advertising
Network. The Delphos
Herald advertising dept.
can set this up for you.
No other classified ad
buy is simpler or more
cost effecti ve. Cal l
419-695-0015 ext. 138
110 Card Of Thanks
WE WISH to express our
gratitude to our friends
and family for their kind-
ness during this difficult
time. Your donations of
food, flowers, time and
other special gifts were
greatly appreciated. To
our wonderful neighbors,
thank you for all of your
assi st ance. Speci al
thanks to Pastor Gary
and Marjean Fish and
the Delphos Christian
Union Church. Thanks,
also, to St. Ritas Hos-
pice for their care. The
Del phos Vet er an s
Council provided a beau-
tiful service at the ceme-
tery. Our si ncerest
thanks to Brian Strayer
and the staff of Strayer
Funeral Home, who of-
fered compassionate
services that deeply hon-
ored our loved one.
The Family of
Terry Spring
305
Apartment For
Rent
1BR APT for rent. Nice,
clean. Appliances, electric
heat, laundry room, No
pets. WATER INCLUDED.
$425/month, plus deposit.
320 N. Jef f er son.
419-852-0833.
2 BEDROOM Ranch
duplex in Delphos.
$425/mo. No Pets.
Newly updated.
419-286-2816.
Call for details.
2BR, NICE, clean,
appliances included.
Washer/Dryer hook-up.
No pets. Water included.
$475/mo plus deposit.
419-303-4938
320 House For Rent
DELPHOS AREA:
Two story, 4BR home.
2 car detached garage.
$750/month +deposit.
Cal l af t er 5pm,
419-230-6500
325
Mobile Homes
For Rent
RENT OR Rent to Own.
1,2 or 3 bedroom mobile
home. 419-692-3951
425 Houses For Sale
PRICE REDUCED!!!
3BR, 2BA Ranch. Large
family room, newly re-
modeled kitchen, central
air, gas heat, 2-car
garage. 603 Dewey,
Delphos. Call for appt.
419-296-8443
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
502 W. 5th St. --BIG BIG
BIG garage sale! Avon,
Christmas trees, dress-
ers, lots of nice clothes.
Saturday 11am-5pm,
Monday 10am-2pm.
560
Home
Furnishings
SOFA, 6 ft., sage green
with accent pillows,
$ 1 7 5 . 0 0 . P h .
419-692-7397.
583
Pets and
Supplies
BLOND AKC Golden
Retriever Pups. Male &
Female, 1st shots, ready
October 14th. $400.
Ph:419-692-1776
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
593
Good Things to
Eat
FREE: BLACK Walnuts.
419-692-4525
640 Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
(419) 223-7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities,
or work at home oppor-
tunities. The BBB will as-
sist in the investigation
of these businesses.
(This notice provided as
a customer service by
The Delphos Herald.)
670 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR
Table or Floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080 Help Wanted
COMMISSION STYLIST
& Nail Tech wanted.
Possible booth rental.
Ca l l Ho l l y a t
419-692-9871
DRIVERS: OTR & Re-
gional. Great Pay & Ex-
cellent Benefits. 401K +
Bonuses. Miles & Guar-
ant eed Homet i me!
CDL-A 6mos OTR exp.
Req. 877-704-3773
NEEDED immediately!!!
Journeymen and Ap-
prentice Electricians with
all levels of experience
for Industrial Construc-
tion project in Ohio. Must
have a valid drivers li-
cense, good work history
and be able to pass a
backgr ound check.
E-mai l resume t o:
office@ei-spec.com or
fax to 605-368-9863.
EEO
OWNER OPERATORS:
100% No-Touch! Dedi-
cated Loads. 2000 or
newer tractor, CDL-A,
12mo exp. Tabi tha:
800-325-7884 x4
R&R EMPLOYMENT &
R&R Medical Staffing
Sanitation, Maintenance,
Producti on Workers,
PRN, LPN, RN, House
Keeping and Dietary.
Accepting applications
for CNA classes starting
November! Apply online
www.rremployment.com
or call 419-232-2008
953
Free and Low
Priced Merchandis
FREE: WOOD. Large
quantity at 228 W. 6th St
NICE SCRAPBOOK /
ART cabinet. Several
shelves for paper. 4
small, 4 large drawers.
Like new, $50. Call
419-230-0561
Todays Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Jenesais--
5 Yo!
8 PDalert
11 Trademark
13 Ms.Hagenofflms
14 Regret
15 Twilledfabric
16 Speakersstand
18 Egg-shaped
20 Listened
21 Praisehighly
23 Inc.cousin
24 Widest.
25 Antlerprong
27 Roofproblem
31 Bronzed
32 Freudsconcerns
33 AbominableSnowman
34 Bloodhoundsclue
36 Radiatorsound
38 Comrade
39 Billoffare
40 Forestpart
41 Corridacry
42 ---relief
44 Disgusting
46 Rank
49 Helper:Abbr.
50 Stirs
52 Exclaimedover
56 Libraryabbr.
57 Tarodish
58 Mr.Spock
59 Canineregistry
60 Ruralelec.provider
61 DairyQueentreat
DOWN
1 ManningandFavre
2 Endingfordepart
3 Rowingtool
4 Goldbar
5 Boatpart
6 Summer in
Cannes
7 Pleasurecraft
8 Vicinity
9 Contentedsound
10 Relax,asrules
12 Give,astime
17 Lingerieitem
19 Findsaperch
21 Hemandhaw
22 Inertgas
23 Reduces
24 Fermisplitit
26 Roulettecolor
28 Moveafern
29 Austrianeighbor
30 Stack
35 Cubeinventor
37 Summer,e.g.
43 Skilled
45 Unfinching
46 Broadbean
47 FurryJedially
48 Chalkymineral
49 Chinasetting
51 Electionmo.
53 MDemployer
54 Longtime
55 Batikneed
Answer to Puzzle
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Putnam County
John R. Barlage and
Carol L. Barlage, 3.804
acres Liberty Township,
toEricJ.Schroeder.
Rosemary A.
Lammers,parcelOttawa
Township, to Rosemary
A.LammersTR.
Robert P. Ellerbrock
and Mary L. Ellerbrock,
5.515 acres Liberty
Township to Steven P.
Ellerbrock.
Robert P. Ellerbrock
LE, Mary L. Ellerbrock
LE, Steven P. Ellerbrock
LE and Linda K.
Ellerbrock LE, 8.330
acres Liberty Township
toWilliamJ.Ellerbrock.
Robert P. Ellerbrock
LEandMaryL.Ellerbrock
LE, 46.944 acres Liberty
Township, 36.446 acres
Liberty Township, 34.195
acres Liberty Township,
20.0 acres Liberty
Township, 18.64 acres
Liberty Township, 40.0
acres Liberty Township
and 7.404 acres Liberty
Township, to Steven P.
Ellerbrock.
James L.
Drummelsmith, Terrie
Drummelsmith, Ronald
L. Drummelsmith,
R o s e m a r y
Drummelsmith, Betty
L. Clay and Jerry Clay,
5.10 acres Liberty
Township, to Eugene R.
Drummelsmith.
William J. Ellerbrock,
Jodi L. Ellerbrock, Louis
R. Ellerbrock and Betty
L. Ellerbrock, Lot 162
Kalida,toGlenJ.Rampe
andAlanJ.Fortman.
Charles L. Proctor,
2.066 acres Blanchard
Township to Amy M.
Proctor.
Ursula Wenzlick,
1.746 acres Monterey
Township to Ryan J.
Miller.
Melanie L. Hull,
Julie K. Gilbert and
Elmer Gilbert, Lot
36 Continental, to
PharmaconLLC.
Kathy A. Boden,
.77 acres Greensburg
Township to Randy
Boden and Jacob
Boden.
Robert E. Hermon,
parcel Sugar Creek
Township to Robert E.
Hermon and Patricia A.
Hermon.
Catherine M. Ruhe,
Lot 104 Columbus
Grove, to Columbus
Grove Local School
District.
Greta Hribernik TR,
3.244 acres Palmer
Township, to Greta
Hribernik TR and Irene
OrdwayTR.
Karl N. Schumacher
TR and Elizabeth A.
SchumacherTR,parcels
Columbus Grove, to
Columbus Grove Local
SchoolDistrict.
StevenSteeleLEand
Phyllis A. Steele LE,
1.341acresSugarCreek
Township,toJacksPlace
LLC.
Steven Steele LE
and Phyllis A. Steele
LE, 35.159 acres Sugar
CreekTownshiptoJacks
PlaceLLC.
William M. Gluss and
JeanetteA.Gluss,10.86
acresRileyTownship,to
WilliamM.GlussTRand
JeanetteA.GlussTR.
Robert J. Nichols II
andJessicaNichols,Lot
452, Ottawa, to Max T.
Affholder.
Herman H. Borgelt
and Rita M. Borgelt,
80.0 acres Greensburg
Township, 59.623
acres Greensburg
Township, 13.447 acres
Greensburg Township
and 76.959 acres
Greensburg Township,
toH&RBorgeltLLC.
Herman H. Borgelt
and Rita M. Borgelt,
3.041 acres Greensburg
Township to Herman H.
Borgelt TR and Rita M.
BorgeltTR.
Louis H. Nienberg LE
and Linda L. Nienberg
LE, Lot 1008, Ottawa,
to Sherri L. Wilson and
DavidL.Nienberg.
Lloyd R. Zeisloft TR
and Marilyn E. Zeisloft
TR, .68 acre Van Buren
Township, 36.63 acres
VanBurenTownshipand
25.269acresVanBuren
Township to Lloyd R.
Zeisloft and Marilyn E.
Zeisloft.
Marilyn E. ZeisloftTR
andLloydR.ZeisloftTR,
20.00 acres Van Buren
Township, 37.50 acres
Van Buren Township,
parcel Van Buren
Township, 16.544 acres
VanBurenTownshipand
4.802 acres Van Buren
Township to Lloyd R.
Zeisloft and Marilyn E.
Zeisloft.
Lloyd R. Zeisloft LE
and Marilyn E. Zeisloft
LE, .68 acre Van Buren
Township, 36.63 acres
Van Buren Township,
parcels Van Buren
Township, 25.269 acres
Van Buren Township,
20.00 acres Van Buren
Township, 37.50 acres
Van Buren Township,
16.544 acres Van
Buren Township and
4.802 acres Van Buren
Township to 3 ZS and 1
LLLC.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Tuesday Evening October 15, 2013
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ESPN2 College Football Olbermann Olbermann Olbermann Olbermann
FAM Happy Gilmore Happy Gilmore The 700 Club You Again
FOOD Chopped Chopped Chopped Cutthroat Kitchen Chopped
FX Paranormal Activity Sons of Anarchy Sons of Anarchy
HGTV Income Property Income Property Hunters Hunt Intl House Hunters Reno Income Property
HIST Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn
LIFE Abby's Dance Abby's Dance Million Dollar Witches of East End Abby's Dance
MTV Catfish: The TV Show Catfish: The TV Show Catfish: The TV Show Catfish: The TV Show Hook Up Hook Up
NICK Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Instant Friends Friends Chris Chris
SCI Face Off Face Off Ghost Hunters Fangasm Face Off
SPIKE Bar Rescue Criss Angel BeLIEve Criss Angel BeLIEve Bar Rescue Criss Angel BeLIEve
TBS MLB Baseball MLB Post. Conan
TCM A Fistful of Dollars Accattone Breathless
TLC Couple Couple 19 Kids 19 Kids The Little Couple 19 Kids 19 Kids The Little Couple
TNT Castle Castle Cold Justice The Mentalist Cold Justice
TOON Uncle Gra Adventure King/Hill Cleveland Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua
TRAV Baggage B Baggage B Baggage B Baggage B Gem Hunt Bizarre Foods Baggage B Baggage B
TV LAND Griffith Griffith Raymond Raymond Friends Friends King King The King of Queens
USA Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU
VH1 Black Ink Crew Tough Love: Co-Ed Miami Monkey T.I.-Tiny T.I.-Tiny Phat Girlz
WGN American Beauty How I Met How I Met Rules Rules Parks
Premium Channels
HBO Hobbit-Unexpected Eastbound Boardwalk Empire Hello This Is 4
MAX Descndnts Warm Bodies The Siege Depravity Strike Ba
SHOW The Master Masters of Sex Homeland Team America
2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
10 The Herald Monday, October 14, 2013
Tomorrows Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
www.delphosherald.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2013
Explore avenues that could
lead to unfamiliar places in the
coming year. Engage in events and
activities that will open your mind to
alternative beliefs, and do your best
to discover new skills and talents.
Youve worked hard to achieve what
you have, so make sure you nurture
your success.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Your
quick assessment of a situation
and subsequent action will prove
that you are capable of much more
than youve been doing. Dont hide
your potential under a bushel. Good
opportunities lie ahead.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
Mull over your ideas, and dont walk
away until you have put your plans
in motion. If you are determined, no
one will stand between you and your
destination.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)
-- Keeping things on track will not be
easy. Youll face interference if you
try to avoid an emotional situation
that needs to be addressed. Precise
documentation will lead to a positive
change.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Serious talks will help you clarify
what you want to achieve and the
best way to go about doing so. Dont
let what someone else does confuse
you. Concentrate on your plans.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Someone may try to teach you a
lesson. Listen, but dont be afraid to
make different changes based on
what works best for you. Don Cupid
has his eye on you.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Your expressive way of sharing
information will work to your
advantage. A chance to engage in a
profitable endeavor will also open up
doors to worthwhile connections.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- If
you make personal changes and
sort through your financial matters,
youll come up with a winning
solution. There are ways to adjust
your budget while enhancing your
life; you just have to find them.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Dont wait around for others to take
control of a situation that you know
you can handle. The rewards will be
unexpected and will come from an
unusual source. Your instincts will
lead you in the right direction.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Refuse to get involved in gossip or
an unfair situation. Keep the peace
at home and look for alternative
ways to use your skills and increase
your earnings.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Broaden you view by engaging
in different cultural or philosophic
events. A lifestyle change will
motivate you to revisit something or
someone from your past. Put what
you learn to good use.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Respond to an ultimatum with a plan
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2013
A realistic look at your current
position will stop you from taking
on too much. Explore activities or
interests that spark your imagination
and bring you joy. Children and
seniors provide you with a different
point of view; listen and learn.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Put
the people you enjoy spending time
with first. Dont hold back if someone
asks you how you feel or what you
want to pursue. Honesty will lead to
victory.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Look at the big picture and
discuss your plans with someone
you feel can contribute to what you
hope to accomplish. Opportunity
and information will come from an
unexpected source.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Be aware of whats going
on around you. Be prepared to
jump in and make changes to
offset something you dont agree
with or like. You could be thrown
into an unsafe situation, so take
precautions.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Youll be offered favors and the
support you need if you present your
requests to innovative recipients.
Use emotional tactics if it will help
you maintain control.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --
Check out destinations that interest
you, but dont put yourself in a
vulnerable position. Journey to safe
places and focus on health, well-
being and enjoying the people you
love.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Your imagination will lead you on
a magic carpet ride. Let your mind
wander and your ideas grow. A
new and exciting venture can bring
in high returns. Youre firing on all
cylinders, so get crackin.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
Follow the current and drift down the
path of least resistance. Your heart
will lead you in the right direction.
Take some time to do what you enjoy
most with someone who is special to
you.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Taking a walk down memory lane
will encourage you to look up old
friends or pursue activities you used
to enjoy. Explore the possibilities that
are available to you for a richer life.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- You
will be torn in different directions
when it comes to your personal life
and professional goals. Give-and-
take will be necessary, along with an
honest evaluation.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
If youre feeling like youre in a rut,
shake things up by attending an
event that could put you in touch with
people who share your interests.
An unusual activity will result in a
change of plans. Dont be afraid to
take a chance.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Size
up your situation before making a
move. Someone is likely to accuse
you of meddling or not keeping your
word. Listen and take care of any
complaints quickly.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Keep the communication going with
family members or co-workers. You
have everything to gain by being
open and addressing what you can
offer a friend, your community or a
group in need of help.
Monday Evening October 14, 2013
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Dancing With Stars Castle Local Jimmy Kimmel Live Nightline
WHIO/CBS How I Met 2 Broke G Big Bang Mom Hostages Local Late Show Letterman Ferguson
WLIO/NBC The Voice The Blacklist Local Tonight Show w/Leno J. Fallon
WOHL/FOX Bones Sleepy Hollow Local
ION Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds
Cable Channels
A & E Beyond Scared Straig Beyond Scared Straig Beyond Scared Straig Beyond Scared Straig Beyond Scared Straig
AMC Friday 13th 3 Friday 13th Friday the 13th-New
ANIM Monsters Inside Me Monsters Inside Me Fatal Attractions Monsters Inside Me Fatal Attractions
BET Notorious Husbands Husbands Husbands- Ho. Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Real Housewives Happens Housewives/NJ Miami
CMT Liar Liar Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Cops Rel.
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Live AC 360 Later E. B. OutFront Piers Morgan Live
COMEDY Futurama Futurama South Pk South Pk Brickle. South Pk Daily Colbert South Pk South Pk
DISC Fast N' Loud Fast N' Loud Pure Evel: Legend Fast N' Loud Pure Evel: Legend
DISN Jessie Halloweentown ANT Farm Austin Shake It Jessie Good Luck Good Luck
E! E! News Kardashian Eric & Je True Hollywood Story Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN Countdown NFL Football SportsCenter
ESPN2 Catching Hell World Series World Series SportCtr SportsNation Baseball
FAM My Best Pretty Woman The 700 Club My Best Friend's
FOOD Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners
FX X-Men: Last X-Men: Last
HGTV Love It or List It Love It or List It Hunters Hunt Intl Love It or List It Love It or List It
HIST Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens
LIFE Madea's Family Madea Goes to Jail Madea's Family
MTV Big Tips Texas Teen Mom 3 Teen Mom 3 Hook Up Snooki Teen Mom 3
NICK Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Friends Friends Chris Chris
SCI The Devil's Advocate Nightmare 4
SPIKE The Rundown Walking Tall Doom
TBS MLB Baseball MLB Post. Conan
TCM Nights of Cabiria The Story of Film: An Odyssey Winter Light
TLC My 600-Lb. Life My 600-Lb. Life My 600-Lb. Life My 600-Lb. Life My 600-Lb. Life
TNT Castle Castle Major Crimes CSI: NY CSI: NY
TOON Uncle Gra MAD King/Hill Cleveland Burgers Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua
TRAV Bizarre Foods Bizarre Foods Hotel Impossible Hotel Impossible Bizarre Foods
TV LAND Griffith Griffith Raymond Raymond Friends Friends King King King King
USA WWE Monday Night RAW X-Men 2
VH1 Basketball Wives T.I.-Tiny Black Ink Crew Basketball Wives T.I.-Tiny Black Ink Crew
WGN Funniest Home Videos Parks Parks WGN News at Nine How I Met Rules Rules Parks
Premium Channels
HBO This Means War Mondays Redemption Open Hrt Eastbound Face Off With Max Kellerman
MAX Rain Man War of the Worlds Strike Back
SHOW Homeland Masters of Sex Homeland Masters of Sex Jay Z Made
2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
that is difficult to refuse. Staying on
top of whatever situation you face
will ensure that you are rewarded for
your troubles.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Talk
is cheap, but it can help you wriggle
out of a sticky situation. Dont make a
personal change without doing your
research. False information could
steer you in the wrong direction.
1
2.0
1.6
1.2
0.8
0.4
0.0
10/8 10/12 10/17 10/22 10/27 11/1 11/6
New York
City
Washington, D.C.
Detroit
Indianapolis
Nashville
Atlanta
Miami
Orlando
New Orleans
Dallas
Houston
Kansas City Denver
Salt Lake City
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Seattle
Portland
Chicago
H L
100s 90s 80s 70s 60s 50s 40s 30s 20s 10s 0s -10s
Rain
Stationary Warm front Cold front
Snow
Minneapolis
Phoenix
REGIONAL FORECAST
Chicago
55/61
Louisville
49/69
Cincinnati
44/65
Richmond
44/61
Columbus
42/63
Cleveland
45/61
Toledo
46/60
Evansville
49/66
Bloomington
46/66
Indianapolis
48/65
Terre Haute
48/63
Fort Wayne
44/60
South Bend
48/60
Lafayette
49/60
Gary
51/60
St. Louis
53/64
Springeld
52/62
Champaign
50/60
Peoria
51/61
Davenport
42/60
Muncie
46/61
Lexington
45/65
TODAY'S INTERNATIONAL FORECAST
TUESDAY TODAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
National extremes
Low: -6 at Butte, Mont.
High: 89 at Laredo, Texas
Today
LO HI WEA
Tuesday
LO HI WEA
Today
LO HI WEA
Tuesday
LO HI WEA
NATIONAL FORECAST
Low 50
High 70
Low 48
High 65
Low 52
High 57
Low 34
High 48
Low 31
High 50
ALMANAC
Sunday through 7 p.m. 0
This month through Nov. 6 0.65 0.68
Total this year 40.31 34.99
Precipitation in inches Total Normal Temperature High Low
30-DAY TEMPERATURE HISTORY
30-DAY PRECIPITATION HISTORY IN INCHES
Indiana extremes
Low: 36 at Fort Wayne
High: 65 at Evansville
SUNDAYS
EXTREMES
TODAY'S TEMPERATURES
TODAY'S AIR QUALITY INDEX
TODAY'S POLLEN COUNT
TODAY'S UV INDEX
SUN AND MOON
Moderate Unhealthy
Low Medium High
Low Moderate High
Very unhealthy
Sunrise today 7:20 a.m.
Sunset today 5:37 p.m.
Sunrise Tuesday 7:21 a.m.
Sunset Tuesday 5:36 p.m.
Moon rises today 3:47 p.m.
Moon sets today 4:22 a.m.
Source: www.airnow.com
Source: www.pollen.com
0 10+ 6 2 4 8
0 10 6 2 4 8 12
Sunday 63 41
(2:21 p.m.) (7:37 a.m.)
Normal 57 39
Record 77 20
(in 1975) (in 1982)
80
70
60
50
40
6 9 3 6 6 3 9 12 noon
a.m. a.m. p.m.
Full Last New First
Nov. 10 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2
Very high
MORE ONLINE
For up-to-the-minute weather, go
to IndyStar.com/weather.
Albuquerque 29 53 Rn 29 50 Pc
Anchorage 20 28 Sn 12 22 Pc
Atlanta 43 68 Su 45 69 Su
Atlantic City 42 61 Su 43 62 Su
Baltimore 42 62 Su 46 65 Su
Billings 18 42 Su 23 47 Pc
Birmingham 49 70 Su 53 75 Su
Boise 24 44 Pc 26 47 Pc
Boston 41 61 Su 47 67 Pc
Bowling Green 49 70 Pc 49 70 Ts
Branson, MO 56 65 Ts 58 69 Ts
Buffalo 46 61 Pc 50 62 Pc
Burlington, VT 28 58 Su 38 60 Su
Charleston, SC 54 71 Su 54 71 Pc
Charleston, WV 38 66 Su 42 69 Su
Charlotte 38 67 Su 43 69 Su
Cheyenne 21 37 Cdy 22 37 Su
Chicago 55 61 Cdy 52 66 Rn
Cincinnati 44 65 Pc 46 70 Pc
Cleveland 45 61 Pc 50 65 Pc
Dallas 64 75 Ts 64 77 Ts
Daytona Beach 64 79 Rn 64 79 Rn
Denver 22 40 Cdy 23 36 Sn
Des Moines 35 58 Pc 41 44 Rn
Detroit 48 58 Rn 50 62 Cdy
El Paso 43 66 Pc 38 58 Su
Fairbanks 11 7 Sn -3 -2 Sn
Fargo, ND 30 44 Pc 26 45 Pc
Flagstaff 21 38 Sn 12 42 Su
Fort Myers 62 83 Pc 62 83 Pc
Grand Rapids 50 59 Pc 46 56 Rn
Green Bay 38 54 Su 37 44 Rn
Honolulu 72 84 Su 72 84 Su
Houston 67 81 Cdy 70 83 Ts
Jackson, MS 53 77 Pc 57 81 Pc
Jacksonville 59 73 Rn 60 72 Pc
Juneau 33 40 Rs 31 36 Rs
Kansas City 43 62 Ts 57 59 Ts
Knoxville 40 68 Su 44 72 Su
Las Vegas 44 60 Su 41 60 Pc
Little Rock 57 73 Cdy 61 75 Ts
Los Angeles 48 65 Su 48 68 Su
Louisville 49 69 Pc 54 75 Su
Memphis 55 73 Pc 58 77 Ts
Miami Beach 70 80 Pc 69 81 Pc
Milwaukee 46 55 Pc 46 53 Rn
Minneapolis 32 50 Su 33 43 Rn
Myrtle Beach,SC 50 70 Su 53 71 Pc
Naples 62 80 Pc 62 85 Pc
Nashville 48 70 Pc 50 75 Su
New Orleans 63 78 Pc 65 80 Pc
NewYork City 43 59 Su 46 67 Su
Norfolk, VA 47 65 Su 48 69 Pc
Oklahoma City 58 70 Ts 60 63 Rn
Omaha 31 57 Cdy 40 40 Rs
Orlando 63 81 Rn 63 82 Pc
Pensacola 58 72 Pc 59 76 Cdy
Philadelphia 40 61 Su 43 65 Su
Phoenix 50 63 Rn 45 67 Su
Pittsburgh 38 62 Su 42 65 Su
Portland, OR 41 51 Rn 44 54 Pc
Portland, ME 35 54 Su 42 58 Pc
Providence 39 63 Su 41 65 Su
Raleigh 39 66 Su 44 67 Pc
Rapid City 24 43 Pc 27 46 Cdy
St. Louis 53 64 Ts 55 72 Ts
Sacramento 39 60 Su 38 62 Pc
Saginaw 32 59 Pc 42 58 Cdy
Salt Lake City 30 37 Pc 28 38 Su
San Antonio 69 79 Cdy 67 81 Ts
San Diego 51 66 Pc 53 70 Su
San Francisco 47 60 Pc 46 62 Pc
San Juan, PR 76 86 Ts 76 84 Ts
Santa Fe 28 43 Rn 26 40 Pc
Savannah 53 71 Su 52 73 Pc
Seattle 42 50 Rn 44 51 Cdy
Sioux Falls, SD 25 52 Pc 31 42 Rs
Spokane 25 47 Cdy 29 48 Cdy
St. Thomas, VI 78 85 Ts 78 86 Ts
Tallahassee 52 75 Pc 50 77 Pc
Tampa 60 83 Pc 60 83 Pc
Tucson 46 59 Rn 36 60 Su
Tulsa 59 70 Ts 62 71 Ts
Washington 42 63 Su 44 65 Su
100
80
60
40
20
10/8 10/12 10/17 10/22 10/27 11/1 11/6
HIGH LOW
Amsterdam 48 53 Cdy
Athens 53 67 Su
Baghdad 50 73 Su
Bangkok 81 91 Ts
Beijing 43 54 Cdy
Beirut 57 73 Su
Berlin 42 56 Su
Bermuda 72 76 Cdy
Buenos Aires 63 82 Pc
Cairo 60 78 Su
Cancun 66 81 Pc
Copenhagen 43 50 Pc
Dublin 39 51 Pc
Edmonton 27 38 Pc
Geneva 48 58 Rn
Halifax 41 52 Su
Helsinki 42 47 Rn
Hong Kong 75 81 Ts
Istanbul 47 57 Su
Jerusalem 50 61 Su
Johannesburg 59 79 Su
Kabul 46 64 Pc
London 51 56 Cdy
Madrid 42 63 Rn
Manila 79 88 Ts
Mexico City 52 76 Pc
Montreal 43 57 Pc
Moscow 23 31 Pc
Nairobi 64 79 Ts
Nassau 72 85 Pc
New Delhi 64 86 Su
Oslo 36 41 Pc
Paris 48 52 Cdy
Rio de Janeiro 66 80 Su
Rome 54 68 Rn
Seoul 48 66 Pc
Singapore 77 87 Ts
Stockholm 39 46 Cdy
Sydney 65 81 Ts
Tokyo 56 68 Rn
Toronto 46 62 Pc
Vancouver 39 46 Rn
Vienna 45 54 Pc
Winnipeg 19 37 Sn
Zurich 44 53 Pc
Detroit
48/58
Good
Plan on lots of
clouds today with a
chance of a few
sprinkles or
showers. Despite
the clouds, it will
be mild with highs
in the mid 60s today and around
70 Tuesday.
- Chikage Windler Showers pos-
sible, espe-
cially north
and west
Mostly
cloudy and
warm. Rain
late tonight
Rain likely,
up to 1 inch
possible
Cool and
blustery
Veteran's
Day will be
breezy and
cool
B8 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 1 S T THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR INDYSTAR.COM A B C
weather
Stay up to date
at m.indystar.com
On your mobile device,
check out the latest news
24/7 at m.indystar.com
Get forecasts on
your mobile phone
Text Wand city (WIndianapolis) or
ZIP code (W46206) to 44636 (4INFO)
for latest forecast.
IS-5764572 IS-5764572
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Indy Northwest
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(317) 334-4444
Indy South
7007 S. Hwy. 31
(corner of Southport & Hwy 31)
(317) 885-4444
Greeneld
1789 N. State St.
Greeneld IN. 46140
(317) 462-9999
Noblesville
247 Sheridan Rd.
(Western Plaza)
(317) 770-9999
Indy West
1451 S. Green St. Brownsburg
(St. Rd. 267 S. of Brown Med Ctr)
(317) 858-8444
Indy Northeast
6115 Allisonville Rd.
(317) 359-4444
Many convenient locations throughout Indiana for additional locations near you call 1-800-371-HEAR
Bird Feed
Headquarters
FREE 5lb. Bag of Bird Feed
Text NURSERY to 44636
2.0
1.6
1.2
0.8
0.4
0.0
10/8 10/12 10/17 10/22 10/27 11/1 11/6
New York
City
Washington, D.C.
Detroit
Indianapolis
Nashville
Atlanta
Miami
Orlando
New Orleans
Dallas
Houston
Kansas City Denver
Salt Lake City
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Seattle
Portland
Chicago
H L
100s 90s 80s 70s 60s 50s 40s 30s 20s 10s 0s -10s
Rain
Stationary Warm front Cold front
Snow
Minneapolis
Phoenix
REGIONAL FORECAST
Chicago
55/61
Louisville
49/69
Cincinnati
44/65
Richmond
44/61
Columbus
42/63
Cleveland
45/61
Toledo
46/60
Evansville
49/66
Bloomington
46/66
Indianapolis
48/65
Terre Haute
48/63
Fort Wayne
44/60
South Bend
48/60
Lafayette
49/60
Gary
51/60
St. Louis
53/64
Springeld
52/62
Champaign
50/60
Peoria
51/61
Davenport
42/60
Muncie
46/61
Lexington
45/65
TODAY'S INTERNATIONAL FORECAST
TUESDAY TODAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
National extremes
Low: -6 at Butte, Mont.
High: 89 at Laredo, Texas
Today
LO HI WEA
Tuesday
LO HI WEA
Today
LO HI WEA
Tuesday
LO HI WEA
NATIONAL FORECAST
Low 50
High 70
Low 48
High 65
Low 52
High 57
Low 34
High 48
Low 31
High 50
ALMANAC
Sunday through 7 p.m. 0
This month through Nov. 6 0.65 0.68
Total this year 40.31 34.99
Precipitation in inches Total Normal Temperature High Low
30-DAY TEMPERATURE HISTORY
30-DAY PRECIPITATION HISTORY IN INCHES
Indiana extremes
Low: 36 at Fort Wayne
High: 65 at Evansville
SUNDAYS
EXTREMES
TODAY'S TEMPERATURES
TODAY'S AIR QUALITY INDEX
TODAY'S POLLEN COUNT
TODAY'S UV INDEX
SUN AND MOON
Moderate Unhealthy
Low Medium High
Low Moderate High
Very unhealthy
Sunrise today 7:20 a.m.
Sunset today 5:37 p.m.
Sunrise Tuesday 7:21 a.m.
Sunset Tuesday 5:36 p.m.
Moon rises today 3:47 p.m.
Moon sets today 4:22 a.m.
Source: www.airnow.com
Source: www.pollen.com
0 10+ 6 2 4 8
0 10 6 2 4 8 12
Sunday 63 41
(2:21 p.m.) (7:37 a.m.)
Normal 57 39
Record 77 20
(in 1975) (in 1982)
80
70
60
50
40
6 9 3 6 6 3 9 12 noon
a.m. a.m. p.m.
Full Last New First
Nov. 10 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2
Very high
MORE ONLINE
For up-to-the-minute weather, go
to IndyStar.com/weather.
Albuquerque 29 53 Rn 29 50 Pc
Anchorage 20 28 Sn 12 22 Pc
Atlanta 43 68 Su 45 69 Su
Atlantic City 42 61 Su 43 62 Su
Baltimore 42 62 Su 46 65 Su
Billings 18 42 Su 23 47 Pc
Birmingham 49 70 Su 53 75 Su
Boise 24 44 Pc 26 47 Pc
Boston 41 61 Su 47 67 Pc
Bowling Green 49 70 Pc 49 70 Ts
Branson, MO 56 65 Ts 58 69 Ts
Buffalo 46 61 Pc 50 62 Pc
Burlington, VT 28 58 Su 38 60 Su
Charleston, SC 54 71 Su 54 71 Pc
Charleston, WV 38 66 Su 42 69 Su
Charlotte 38 67 Su 43 69 Su
Cheyenne 21 37 Cdy 22 37 Su
Chicago 55 61 Cdy 52 66 Rn
Cincinnati 44 65 Pc 46 70 Pc
Cleveland 45 61 Pc 50 65 Pc
Dallas 64 75 Ts 64 77 Ts
Daytona Beach 64 79 Rn 64 79 Rn
Denver 22 40 Cdy 23 36 Sn
Des Moines 35 58 Pc 41 44 Rn
Detroit 48 58 Rn 50 62 Cdy
El Paso 43 66 Pc 38 58 Su
Fairbanks 11 7 Sn -3 -2 Sn
Fargo, ND 30 44 Pc 26 45 Pc
Flagstaff 21 38 Sn 12 42 Su
Fort Myers 62 83 Pc 62 83 Pc
Grand Rapids 50 59 Pc 46 56 Rn
Green Bay 38 54 Su 37 44 Rn
Honolulu 72 84 Su 72 84 Su
Houston 67 81 Cdy 70 83 Ts
Jackson, MS 53 77 Pc 57 81 Pc
Jacksonville 59 73 Rn 60 72 Pc
Juneau 33 40 Rs 31 36 Rs
Kansas City 43 62 Ts 57 59 Ts
Knoxville 40 68 Su 44 72 Su
Las Vegas 44 60 Su 41 60 Pc
Little Rock 57 73 Cdy 61 75 Ts
Los Angeles 48 65 Su 48 68 Su
Louisville 49 69 Pc 54 75 Su
Memphis 55 73 Pc 58 77 Ts
Miami Beach 70 80 Pc 69 81 Pc
Milwaukee 46 55 Pc 46 53 Rn
Minneapolis 32 50 Su 33 43 Rn
Myrtle Beach,SC 50 70 Su 53 71 Pc
Naples 62 80 Pc 62 85 Pc
Nashville 48 70 Pc 50 75 Su
New Orleans 63 78 Pc 65 80 Pc
NewYork City 43 59 Su 46 67 Su
Norfolk, VA 47 65 Su 48 69 Pc
Oklahoma City 58 70 Ts 60 63 Rn
Omaha 31 57 Cdy 40 40 Rs
Orlando 63 81 Rn 63 82 Pc
Pensacola 58 72 Pc 59 76 Cdy
Philadelphia 40 61 Su 43 65 Su
Phoenix 50 63 Rn 45 67 Su
Pittsburgh 38 62 Su 42 65 Su
Portland, OR 41 51 Rn 44 54 Pc
Portland, ME 35 54 Su 42 58 Pc
Providence 39 63 Su 41 65 Su
Raleigh 39 66 Su 44 67 Pc
Rapid City 24 43 Pc 27 46 Cdy
St. Louis 53 64 Ts 55 72 Ts
Sacramento 39 60 Su 38 62 Pc
Saginaw 32 59 Pc 42 58 Cdy
Salt Lake City 30 37 Pc 28 38 Su
San Antonio 69 79 Cdy 67 81 Ts
San Diego 51 66 Pc 53 70 Su
San Francisco 47 60 Pc 46 62 Pc
San Juan, PR 76 86 Ts 76 84 Ts
Santa Fe 28 43 Rn 26 40 Pc
Savannah 53 71 Su 52 73 Pc
Seattle 42 50 Rn 44 51 Cdy
Sioux Falls, SD 25 52 Pc 31 42 Rs
Spokane 25 47 Cdy 29 48 Cdy
St. Thomas, VI 78 85 Ts 78 86 Ts
Tallahassee 52 75 Pc 50 77 Pc
Tampa 60 83 Pc 60 83 Pc
Tucson 46 59 Rn 36 60 Su
Tulsa 59 70 Ts 62 71 Ts
Washington 42 63 Su 44 65 Su
100
80
60
40
20
10/8 10/12 10/17 10/22 10/27 11/1 11/6
HIGH LOW
Amsterdam 48 53 Cdy
Athens 53 67 Su
Baghdad 50 73 Su
Bangkok 81 91 Ts
Beijing 43 54 Cdy
Beirut 57 73 Su
Berlin 42 56 Su
Bermuda 72 76 Cdy
Buenos Aires 63 82 Pc
Cairo 60 78 Su
Cancun 66 81 Pc
Copenhagen 43 50 Pc
Dublin 39 51 Pc
Edmonton 27 38 Pc
Geneva 48 58 Rn
Halifax 41 52 Su
Helsinki 42 47 Rn
Hong Kong 75 81 Ts
Istanbul 47 57 Su
Jerusalem 50 61 Su
Johannesburg 59 79 Su
Kabul 46 64 Pc
London 51 56 Cdy
Madrid 42 63 Rn
Manila 79 88 Ts
Mexico City 52 76 Pc
Montreal 43 57 Pc
Moscow 23 31 Pc
Nairobi 64 79 Ts
Nassau 72 85 Pc
New Delhi 64 86 Su
Oslo 36 41 Pc
Paris 48 52 Cdy
Rio de Janeiro 66 80 Su
Rome 54 68 Rn
Seoul 48 66 Pc
Singapore 77 87 Ts
Stockholm 39 46 Cdy
Sydney 65 81 Ts
Tokyo 56 68 Rn
Toronto 46 62 Pc
Vancouver 39 46 Rn
Vienna 45 54 Pc
Winnipeg 19 37 Sn
Zurich 44 53 Pc
Detroit
48/58
Good
Plan on lots of
clouds today with a
chance of a few
sprinkles or
showers. Despite
the clouds, it will
be mild with highs
in the mid 60s today and around
70 Tuesday.
- Chikage Windler Showers pos-
sible, espe-
cially north
and west
Mostly
cloudy and
warm. Rain
late tonight
Rain likely,
up to 1 inch
possible
Cool and
blustery
Veteran's
Day will be
breezy and
cool
B8 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 1 S T THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR INDYSTAR.COM A B C
weather
Stay up to date
at m.indystar.com
On your mobile device,
check out the latest news
24/7 at m.indystar.com
Get forecasts on
your mobile phone
Text Wand city (WIndianapolis) or
ZIP code (W46206) to 44636 (4INFO)
for latest forecast.
IS-5764572 IS-5764572
NEEDED
AREA RESIDENTS
to try new DIGITAL
Technology in Hearing Aids
HEARING
TESTS
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Pl ease cal l i mmedi atel y.
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i mprovement wi th new i nstruments,
you may choose to retai n them and recei ve
$500 OFF one i nstrument or
$1000 OFF A COMPLETE SET.
You wi l l al so recei ve a FREE Li feti me
I n-Offi ce Mai ntenance for the l i fe of the heari ng ai ds
and a year suppl y of Batteri es.
Benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Beltone Hearing Care Centers are independently owned and operated. Participation may vary by location. 2011 Beltone
Hearing Centers
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(317) 334-4444
Indy South
7007 S. Hwy. 31
(corner of Southport & Hwy 31)
(317) 885-4444
Greeneld
1789 N. State St.
Greeneld IN. 46140
(317) 462-9999
Noblesville
247 Sheridan Rd.
(Western Plaza)
(317) 770-9999
Indy West
1451 S. Green St. Brownsburg
(St. Rd. 267 S. of Brown Med Ctr)
(317) 858-8444
Indy Northeast
6115 Allisonville Rd.
(317) 359-4444
Many convenient locations throughout Indiana for additional locations near you call 1-800-371-HEAR
Bird Feed
Headquarters
FREE 5lb. Bag of Bird Feed
Text NURSERY to 44636
1541 Allentown Road, Suite C
Lima
419-516-0645
Mon.-Thurs. 9-5
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If your evaluation shows hearing improvement with new instruments, you may choose to retain them and receive
$500 OFF one instrument or
$1000.00 OFF A COMPLETE SET.
You will also receive a FREE Lifetime In-Office Maintenance for the life of the
hearing aids and a FREE $50 Visa Card*.
HEARING TESTS
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*Hearing aids must be purchased for 30-day Trial.
Patient may return aids within 30 days of purchase for a full refund.
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Promise Technology
Monday, October 14, 2013 The Herald 11
www.delphosherald.com
Trivia
Answers to Saturdays questions:
The red-light district got its name from an actual lamp
the red oil lamp that hung on the last car of a railroad
trains. These lamps were carried by railroad men to and
from trains and in some cases, they were hung outside the
brothels the men frequented between shifts.
The phrase 23-Skiddoo was coined by New Yorks
Finest along 23rd Street in the years before World War I.
At the corner of 23rd Street and Broadway, men used to
stand outside the famous Flatiron Building for free looks at
ladies well-turned ankles. The police dutifully moved the
audience along, thus giving rise the phrase.
Todays questions:
Why is the head groomsman at a wedding called the
best man?
What is the origin of the word nightmare?
Answers in Wednesdays Herald.
(Continued from page 1)
Many parks and monuments remain
closed, drawing a protest at the National
World War II Memorial on Sunday that
included tea party-backed lawmakers who
had unsuccessfully demanded defunding
of Obamas 3-year-old health care law in
exchange for keeping the government open.
Unnerving to world economies is the
prospect of the United States defaulting
on its financial obligations on Thursday
if Congress fails to raise the borrowing
authority above the $16.7 trillion debt limit.
Christine Lagarde, the International
Monetary Funds managing director, spoke
fearfully about the disruption and uncer-
tainty, warning of a risk of tipping, yet
again, into recession after the fitful recov-
ery from 2008. The reaction of world finan-
cial markets and the Dow Jones today will
influence any congressional talks.
Congress is racing the clock to get
a deal done, faced with time-consuming
Senate procedures that could slow legisla-
tion, likely opposition from tea partyers
and certain resistance in the Republican-led
House before a bill gets to Obama.
Politically, Republicans are reeling,
bearing a substantial amount of the blame
for the government shutdown and stale-
mate.
Were in a free-fall as Republicans,
but Democrats are not far behind, said
Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., in warning
Democrats about seizing on the GOPs
bruised brand as leverage to extract more
concessions.
McConnell and Republicans want to
continue current spending at $986.7 billion
and leave untouched the new round of cuts
in January, commonly known as sequester,
that would reduce the amount to $967 bil-
lion. Democrats want to figure out a way
to undo the reductions, plus a long-term
extension of the debt limit increase and
a short-term spending bill to reopen the
government.
Republicans want to do it with entitle-
ment cuts, said Sen. Chuck Schumer,
D-N.Y. Democrats want to do it with a
mix of mandatory cuts, some entitlements
and revenues. And so how do you over-
come that dilemma? Were not going to
overcome it in the next day or two.
He suggested keeping the government
running through mid-January.
Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, the No. 2
Democrat in the Senate, told reporters the
two sides are roughly $70 billion apart,
the difference between the $1.058 trillion
Senate budget amount and the $988 billion
envisioned by House Budget Committee
Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis.
We havent picked a number, but clear-
ly we need to negotiate between those two,
Durbin said.
Republicans dismiss the latest request as
Reid moving the goalposts in negotiations
as they were getting closer to resolving the
stalemate that has paralyzed Washington.
They also argue that it is disingenuous
for Democrats to resist any changes in the
3-year-old health care law while trying to
undo the 2011 budget law that put the cuts
on track.
I think the Democrats are on the verge
of being one tick too cute as they see the
House possibly in disarray they now are
overreaching, and I think that what weve
got to do is get this back in the middle of
the road, act like adults, said Sen. Bob
Corker, R-Tenn.
Graham and Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.,
said they would not support any deal that
upends the spending limits imposed by the
2011 law, and predicted that their Senate
GOP colleagues would oppose it as well.
Out of play, for now, was the Republican-
led House, where Speaker John Boehner,
R-Ohio, told GOP lawmakers early Saturday
that his talks with the president had ground to
a halt. Obama telephoned House Democratic
leader Nancy Pelosi on Sunday, focusing on
the need for any increase in the debt limit
without concessions.
Also sidelined, at least for now, was
the plan forged by Collins and a bipartisan
coalition to briefly fund the government
and extend the $16.7 trillion debt limit, in
exchange for steps like temporarily delay-
ing the medical device tax that helps fund
the health care law.
Democrats said Collins plan curbed
spending too tightly, and Reid announced
Saturday it was going nowhere.
Collins said Sunday that both Democrats
and Republicans continue to offer ideas and
say they want to be part of the group work-
ing to reopen the government and address
the debt ceiling before Thursdays deadline.
Were going to keep working, offer-
ing our suggestions to the leadership on
both sides of the aisle in an attempt to be
constructive and bring this impasse to an
end. Surely we owe that to the American
people, Collins said.
(Continued from page 1)
In 2011, more than 50 pounds of prescription drugs were
turned over to the Van Wert County Sheriffs Office. In 2012,
84 pounds of prescription drugs were turned over. So far in
2013, more than 80 pounds of prescription drugs has already
been turned over.
The sheriffs office has already started the collection and
Riggenbach also advises citizens they can drop prescription
drugs off at the Van Wert County Sheriffs Office at any time
throughout the year.
Sheriff Riggenbach encourages everyone to turn in prescrip-
tion drugs that are no longer needed or expired. People turning
in prescription drugs are able to do so without any questions
being asked.
Budget Take back
Social Security raise to be among lowest in years
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON For the second straight
year, millions of Social Security recipients,
disabled veterans and federal retirees can
expect historically small increases in their
benefits come January.
Preliminary figures suggest a bene-
fit increase of roughly 1.5 percent, which
would be among the smallest since automatic
increases were adopted in 1975, according to
an analysis by The Associated Press.
Next years raise will be small because
consumer prices, as measured by the govern-
ment, havent gone up much in the past year.
The exact size of the cost-of-living adjust-
ment, or COLA, wont be known until the
Labor Department releases the inflation
report for September. That was supposed
to happen Wednesday, but the report was
delayed indefinitely because of the partial
government shutdown.
The COLA is usually announced in
October to give Social Security and other
benefit programs time to adjust January pay-
ments. The Social Security Administration
has given no indication that raises would be
delayed because of the shutdown, but advo-
cates for seniors said the uncertainty was
unwelcome.
Social Security benefits have continued
during the shutdown.
More than one-fifth of the country is wait-
ing for the news.
Nearly 58 million retirees, disabled work-
ers, spouses and children get Social Security
benefits. The average monthly payment is
$1,162. A 1.5 percent raise would increase the
typical monthly payment by about $17.
The COLA also affects benefits for more
than 3 million disabled veterans, about 2.5
million federal retirees and their survivors,
and more than 8 million people who get
Supplemental Security Income, the disability
program for the poor.
Automatic COLAs were adopted so that
benefits for people on fixed incomes would
keep up with rising prices. Many seniors,
however, complain that the COLA sometimes
falls short, leaving them little wiggle room.
David Waugh of Bethesda, Md., said he
can handle one small COLA but several in
a row make it hard to plan for unexpected
expenses.
Im not one of those folks thats going to
fall into poverty, but it is going to make a dif-
ference in my standard of living as time goes
by, said Waugh, 83, who retired from the
United Nations. I live in a small apartment
and I have an old car, and its going to break
down. And no doubt when it does, Ill have to
fix it or get a new one.
Since 1975, annual Social Security raises
have averaged 4.1 percent. Only six times
have they been less than 2 percent, including
this year, when the increase was 1.7 percent.
There was no COLA in 2010 or 2011 because
inflation was too low.
By law, the cost-of-living adjustment is
based on the Consumer Price Index for Urban
Wage Earners and Clerical Workers, or CPI-
W, a broad measure of consumer prices
generated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
It measures price changes for food, housing,
clothing, transportation, energy, medical care,
recreation and education.
The COLA is calculated by comparing con-
sumer prices in July, August and September
each year to prices in the same three months
from the previous year. If prices go up over the
course of the year, benefits go up, starting with
payments delivered in January.
This year, average prices for July and
August were 1.4 percent higher than they
were a year ago, according to the CPI-W.
Once the September report, the final piece
of the puzzle, is released, the COLA can be
announced officially. If prices continued to
slowly inch up in September, that would put
the COLA at roughly 1.5 percent.
Several economists said there were no
dramatic price swings in September to sig-
nificantly increase or decrease the projected
COLA. That means the projection shouldnt
change by more than a few tenths of a per-
centage point, if at all.
2
133 E. Main St.
Van Wert, Ohio
419-238-1580
Balyeats
Coffee Shop
Kennedy-Kuhn
Division of
Kuhn-Feld Group L.L.C.
419-238-1299
10305 Liberty-Union Rd.
Your Source for John Deere Ag. Commercial
& Consumer Equipment
LAUDICK'S
JEWELRY
1244 S. ShannonSt.
Van Wert
419-238-2266
229 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert
419-771-7297
simplysivart@gmail.com
a unique sweet experience
for more event information visit us at www.visitvanwert.org
118 West Main Street Van Wert, Ohio 45891
419-238-WERT (9378)
906 WEST MAIN STREET
VAN WERT, OH 45891
www.statewideford.com
SPECIAL CREDIT
FINANCE
LOCATION MANAGER
Apple Dumplings
Apple Cider
Homemade
Apple Pie
and other
Delicious Fall
Treats
27
th
Annual Van Wert County
at the Van Wert County Fairgrounds,
US Rt. 127 South, Van Wert

All day long both days:
Wagon Rides Apple Butter Cookin'
Fresh Caramel Corn Makin'
Maple Syrup Cookin' Pony Rides
Face Painting Chair Caning
Van Wert County Art Show Kids' Games
Working Model Train Display
Saturday, October 19:
Homestead Donkeys & Petting Zoo
North Gate: Mile Fun Run at 11:30 am
Junior Fair Building Stage:
9 am to 9:30 am Katlyn Wendel
10 am to 11 am Kim's Dance Works
2:30 to 4 pm Nancy & Company
ALL BUILDINGS OPEN 9 AM TO 5 PM
101 W. Crawford Street, P.O. Box 350, Van Wert, Ohio 45891
419-238-6214 Mon.-Fri. 8:00-5:00
www.purmortbros.com
Call and compare with the people who care
FAMILY INSURANCE NEEDS
Homeowners
Automobile
Life Insurance
BUSINESS INSURANCE NEEDS
Liability Insurance
Fire Insurance
Group Insurance
PB
PURMORT BROTHERS
INSURANCE AGENCY
Insurance Since 1876
Medical Insurance
Long Term Care
Farm owners
Business Cars & Trucks
Long Term Care
Farmowners
Crafts galore in all three buildings!
Friday, October 18 - 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
Saturday, October 19 - 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Friday, October 18:
Crafts Delicious Food Produce
Administration Building: Flu shots
Junior Fair Building Stage:
2 pm to 3 pm Curtis Young -
Apple Tree Presentation
3:30 pm to 5 pm Trinity
5:30 pm-6:30 pm Pam's School of Dance
6:30 pm-8:30pm Blind Date Band
ALL BUILDINGS OPEN 11 AM TO 9 PM
Van Wert County
Fruit Growers
Carl & Ruth Lape
15102 McCleery Road, Van Wert, OH
419-238-3911
Hosted by the Van Wert County Fruit
Growers Association and the Van Wert
County Agricultural.
Non-Profit Organizations Working To
Bring Van Wert Together.
2012 Apple Festival dedicated to our spon-
sor. Thanks for your years of dedication!
FREE ADMISSION & PARKING FREE WAGON RIDES FREE ENTERTAINMENT
CALL 419-238-3911 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
12 The Herald Monday, October 14, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
These fine restaurants invite you to check out their delicious specials!
Ramblers Roost
Restaurant
and Truck Stop
18191A LINCOLN HWY.
MIDDLE POINT, OH 45863
Ph. 419-968-2118 for carryout
or 419-968-2209
* Fuel * Convenience Store
OPEN 24 HOURS
*Restaurant
OPEN 24 HOURS
24 hours a day EVERY DAY OF THE YEAR
at The ROOST you can eat BREAKFAST
any time - Day or Night!
Sat. & Sun. SPECIAL: All You Can Eat
BREAKFAST BAR 9:00 A.M.-1:00 P.M.
All your favorite Meats, Eggs, Egg Bakes,
Biscuits & Sausage Gravy, Pancakes, French Toast, Fried Mush,
Bread Pudding, Fresh Fruits & Pastries only $7.99
* Remember after the game or your favorite night
time activities - we are open TO SERVE YOU!
WE ARE NEVER CLOSED
BREAKFAST! BREAKFAST! BREAKFAST!
Redeem this coupon for a FREE kids
meal (includes kid's entree & drink) with the
purchase of any regular priced entree.
Valid for kids 12 and under. Valid at Lima location only. Limit one free kids meal
per adult entree. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 1.
'3&&,*%4.&"-
2330 Elida Rd., Lima
IN FRONT OF THE LIMA MALL
(419)999-0023
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133 E. Fifth St.
Delphos
Ph.
419-695-8085
ANY
LARGE
PIZZA
DINE IN, CARRY OUT OR DELIVERY
$
10
BRING IN THIS
AD for
5 breadsticks
with marinara
for only
$
1
99
with a
$10 purchase