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Social Learning Theory:

A MedEd Primer
Alix Darden
Jade Duncan
Lindsey Hahn
Matt Miles
Motivating
beliefs,
perceptions,
values,
emotions,
meanings
Environmental
factors
(reinforcers,
punishes)
Behavior
Learning is dependent on social interaction
Learning occurs:
within a social context
by observing and modeling


History of Social Learning Theory
Most significant contributors
L Vygotsky BF Skinner A Bandura
1896-1934 1904-1990 1925 -
http://techforinstructionandassessment.wikispaces.com/file/view/artigos_img06.gif/
31279645/345x296/artigos_img06.gif
Lev Vygotsky
Constructivism
Knowledge is constructed in
a social environment
Zone of Proximal
Development just outside
learners ability alone
Scaffolding instructor, or
more expert peer, provides
support for learning
Support gradually removed
as expertise increases, until
no longer needed





BF Skinner
Behaviorism
Operant Conditioning: behavior modification
through the use of positive and negative
reinforcement and negative and positive
punishment.
Positive reinforcers- favorable outcomes for
desired behavior
Negative reinforcers- removal of unfavorable
outcomes when desired behavior is achieved
Positive Punishment- an unfavorable outcome is
given for undesired behavior.
Negative punishment- removal of favorable
outcome when undesired behavior occurs.
The hope is that in the end the negative
behavior will decrease and positive behavior
will increase
http://psybibs.revdak.com/2010/kille-operant.gif

Albert Bandura
Cognitivism
Modeling/ Reciprocal Determinism
Learning through observing the behavior , attitudes and outcomes
of behaviors of others. Environment causes behavior and behavior
causes environment.
Reciprocal interaction between cognitive, behavioral and
environmental influences
Conditions for effective Modeling:
- Attention
- Retention
- Reproduction
- Motivation
http://www.careers.govt.nz/fileadmin/image/rte/model-bandura.png
Learning theories are expanding to
incorporate technology
Technology allows for informal,
longitudinal learning between
peers
Overcomes differences in
language, location, and time
zones
Social interactions guide
knowledge distribution and
allow for reflection within and
between learners
http://ci484-learning-
technologies.wikispaces.com/file/view/georgesiemens_social_media_conn
ectivism.jpg/248551267/georgesiemens_social_media_connectivism.jpg
Communities of Practice
Traditional communities of
practice can utilize technology to
further their efforts thanks to ease
of access to other in the
community
Skype, tele-conferencing, blogs,
discussion boards, etc. expands the
opportunity for shared experience
These experiences feed back on
the groups own identity and values
and guide their ongoing
development as a community
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/13/article-2232136-
15FE104E000005DC-935_468x380.jpg
Examples of Connectivism in
Medical Education
DrMedEd Twitter -
https://twitter.com/DrMedEd

Medical Education Blog -
http://www.mededucconversations.com/201
4/06/11/july-issue-of-medical-education-
journal-available-for-comment/

MedEd Chat (Twitter)- Live,Thursdays, 9pm
ET - https://twitter.com/MedEdChat

MedEd Portal Twitter -
https://twitter.com/MedEdPORTAL


Connectivism Video Critique
Content
Nice introduction to topic, more definition needed regarding:
How are learning goals defined?
How can an instructor guide the exploration and ensure use of valid sources?
Interesting ideas about the opportunity for synthesis of new information and defining
new role for instructors as facilitators
Presentation
Mixed reviews text components were difficult to read, some found the format to be
distracting, some would have preferred animation rather than animating by hand
Thoughts on Connectivism
Great way to utilize technology to the benefit of todays learners
Instructor must take care to monitor context and content of information, especially in
medical education
References
1. Operant Conditioning (Skinner) | Learning Theories. (n.d.). Learning
Theories RSS. Retrieved June 18, 2014, from http://www.learning-
theories.com/operant-conditioning-skinner.html
2. Social Learning Theory (Bandura) | Learning Theories. (n.d.). Learning
Theories RSS. Retrieved June 18, 2014, from http://www.learning-
theories.com/social-learning-theory-bandura.html
3. Lewis, L. (2010). Virtual communities of practice: Bridging research and
practice using web 2.0. Journal of Educational Technology Systems, 39(2),
155-161.