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Grade: 5

Unit 6 : Native Americans: Conflict and change


By the end of the unit, students will answer the following two writing prompts:
When European colonists began to settle in what they called the New World, there was increasing conflict for territorial, economic, and political
control. Although some Native American groups tried to remain neutral or conciliatory, over time the competition for land and resources and a
series of broken treaties created a great hostility.

Pair images with some writing and a poem (multiple sources) to write an opinion?
How could the European settlers (US GOVT?) have better handled their dealing with Native American tribes? Use the images, texts and maps that
we have looked at and read throughout the unit. Quote (that is, cite) evidence from those sources.
OR
Reparations are the act of making amends for a wrong by paying money or helping those that are wronged. In your opinon, does the US
government owe reparations to the Native Americans? Use the images, texts and maps that we have looked at and read throughout the unit.
Quote (that is, cite) evidence from those sources.

Dont forget:
To introduce your topic clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the purpose of
your writing.
To provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.
To link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses.
To provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion you are presenting.




Week Mentor text Supplemental
text/Multimedia
Standards Informal
Assessment
Reading Writing Speaking/Listening Language
1
Only the Names Remain:
The Cherokees and The
Trail of Tears by Alex
Bealer (Lexile 1050)
Trail of Tears
painting
Trail of Tears
Map
Map of
dwindling Indian
territory?
Strategy:
Determining Importance

Standard:
RI.5.1, RI.5.2, RI.5.8
W.5.8, W.5.9 SL.5.1, SL.5.3, SL.5.6 L.5.1, L.5.2, L.5.3,
L.5.4, L5.6
Quick write on
multiple main ideas
that can be gathered
from viewing the
territory map
2

Readworks Passage on
Westward Expansion
and the Trail of Tears
(Lexile 820)
A Friend of the
Indians Poem by
Joseph Bruchac
If you lived with the
Cherokee by Peter
Roop (Lexile 800)
Navajo Long Walk
by Nancy Armstrong
(Lexile 700)
Why Did Cherokees
Move West by
Judith Pinkerton
Josephson Chapter
4
Strategy:
Determining Importance
Standard:
RI 5.1, RI5.2 RI. 5.8

W.5.8, W.5.9 SL.5.1, SL.5.3, SL.5.6 L.5.1, L.5.2, L.5.3,
L.5.4, L5.6
Authors Points and
Reasons graphic
organizer
3
Cheyenne Again by Eve
Bunting
Children of the
Indian Boarding
Schools by Holly
Littlefield (Lexile
980)
My Name Is
Seepeetza by
Shirley Sterling
(Lexile 720)
Strategy:
Inferring
Standard:
RI.5.1, RI.5.6, RI 5.7

W.5.1, SL.5.1, SL.5.3, SL.5.6 L.5.1, L.5.2, L.5.3,
L.5.4, L5.6
Quick write on why
Young Bulls father
sent him away and
how his father
might have felt
Comparing
viewpoints graphic
organizer
4 American Indian
Boarding Schools
(pg.5-6)
Native American
Boarding School photos
Home to Medicine
Mountain by Chiori
Santiago (Lexile 520)
Strategy:
Inferring, Asking
Questions
Standard:
RI.5.1, RI.5.6, RI 5.7
W.5.1, W.5.5,
W.5.6
SL.5.1, SL.5.3, SL.5.6 L.5.1, L.5.2, L.5.3,
L.5.4, L5.6
Photo Analysis
Worksheet
http://www.archiv
es.gov/education/l
essons/worksheets
/photo_analysis_w
orksheet.pdf

Comparing
viewpoints graphic
organizer
5
Why Native Americans Dont
Want Reparations
http://www.washingtonpost.co
m/posteverything/wp/2014/06/
10/why-native-americans-dont-
want-reparations/


Reparations Are Owed
http://www.slate.com/article
s/news_and_politics/politics/
2014/05/reparations_should
_be_paid_to_black_american
s_here_is_how_america_sho
uld.html
Should Native Americans
Receive Reparations?
http://www.debate.org/opini
ons/should-native-
Strategy:
Determining Importance
Standard:
RI.5.1, RI.5.6, RI 5.7
W.5.4, W.5.5,
W.5.6,
SL.5.1, SL.5.3, SL.5.6 L.5.1, L.5.2, L.5.3,
L.5.4, L5.6
Final Draft of Prose
Constructed
Response
Comparing
viewpoints graphic
organizer
americans-receive-
reparations
Boarding School Memories: http://listen.sdpb.org/post/boarding-school-memories-haunt-lakota-man
*note: Bold standards indicate when new standard is introduced **Note: standards highlighted are the focus standards for the week
From Bigelow, Bill, and Bob Peterson.Rethinking Columbus: the next 500 years. 2nd ed. Milwaukee, WI: Rethinking Schools, 1998. Print.
Image A: Map of Dwindling Lands:


A Friend of the Indians by Joseph Bruchac
A man who was known
as a friend of the Indians
spoke to Red Jacket one day
about the good treatment
the Senecas enjoyed
from their white neighbors.

Red Jacket walked with him
beside the river, then suggested
they should sit together
on a log next to the stream.
They both sat down.
Then Red Jacket slid closer
to the man and said, Move Over.
The man moved over, but when he did
Red Jacket again slid closer.
Move Over, he said.

Three times this happened
until the man had reached
the end of the log near the water.
Then, once more, he was told,
Move Over.
But if I move further
I shall fall in the water,
the man pleaded,
teetering on the edge.
Red Jacket replied,
And even so you whites
tell us to move on when
no place is left to go.
From Wounds Beneath the Flesh, ed. by Maurice Kenny (Fredonia, NY: White Pine Press, 1987)
Joseph Bruchac is a noted Abenaki poet, author and scholar
Red Jacket was an Iroquois leader