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UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

DIVISION OF OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE


and

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
at the

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY

STUDENT HANDBOOK
2009-2010

TABLE OF CONTENTS
FREQUENTLY USED TELEPHONE NUMBERS...........................................................................................4
FACULTY...........................................................................................................................................................5
ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF..............................................................................................................................7
DIVISION POLICIES AND GENERAL INFORMATION...............................................................................8
1.

Scholastic Standards.........................................................................................................................8

2.

Academic Standing...........................................................................................................................9

3.

The Fieldwork Program....................................................................................................................10

4.

Rights of Appeal................................................................................................................................11

5.

Ethical Standards and Academic Integrity.......................................................................................11

6.

Absences, Punctuality and Examination Make-ups.........................................................................12

7.

Students with Disabilities.................................................................................................................12

8.

Subscribing to a List Serve...............................................................................................................12

9.

Commencement.................................................................................................................................12

10. Dress Recommendations...................................................................................................................12


11. Professional Organizations...............................................................................................................13
12. Centennial: OT Special Interest Housing.........................................................................................13
BASIC EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AND CURRICULUM DESIGN......................................................14
1.

Curriculum Framework for all Programs in the Division................................................................14

2.

Curriculum Design for the Entry Level Program.............................................................................15

3.

Curriculum Sequence........................................................................................................................19

4.

The Length and Requirements of the Educational Program............................................................21


A. Sequence of Courses for B.S. to M.A. Students.........................................................................21
B. Sequence of Courses for M.A. Students......................................................................................22
C. MA Graduation Requirements....................................................................................................23
D. Clinical and Research Elective Courses.....................................................................................23
E. Division Program Composite / Sequences and Timelines..........................................................31

CALENDARS....................................................................................................................................................32
1.

University Academic Calendar.........................................................................................................32

2.

Division General Schedule................................................................................................................33


Professional Program, Summer 2009...............................................................................................34
Professional Program, Fall 2009.......................................................................................................36
Professional Program, Spring 2010 (Projected)...............................................................................40

MAPS AND DIRECTIONS FOR UPC AND HSC...........................................................................................44


PARKING AT UPC.............................................................................................................................................44
INTERCAMPUS TRAM SCHEDULE..............................................................................................................44
AOTA CODE OF ETHICS.................................................................................................................................45
USC CODE OF ETHICS...................................................................................................................................49

APPENDICES
A. Academic Dishonesty Sanction Guide................................................................................................50
B. Report Form for Academic Integrity Violation....................................................................................51
C. How to Avoid Plagiarism.....................................................................................................................53
D. Academic Integrity: A Guide for Graduate Students..........................................................................56
E. Academic Integrity Quiz......................................................................................................................56
F. APA Format Requirements...................................................................................................................59
G. Emergency Procedures.........................................................................................................................59
STUDENT AGREEMENT (sign and return to O.T. office during the first week of class)..............................61

Note: Includes all information as of 6/12/2009

UNIVERSITY of SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA


DIVISION of OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE & OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
at the SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY
1540 Alcazar Street, CHP-133
Los Angeles, CA 90089-9003
(323) 442-2850
The Division of Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy is fully accredited (2004-20014)
by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education,
4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220,
Bethesda, Maryland 20824-1220
(301) 652-2682
FREQUENTLY USED TELEPHONE NUMBERS:
Financial Aid (HSC)
Jason Murrillo
Degree Progress Division
Graduate School
LAS Advisement (UPC)
Ask for a pre-health advisor
Health Insurance Coordinators
Roxana Solana
Registration and Records (UPC)
Registration Holds (UPC)
Academic Support and
Disability Services (UPC)
The Testing Bureau (UPC)
The Writing Center (UPC)
Student Counseling Services (UPC)
Student Health Counseling Services (HSC)
Bookstore (HSC)
Bookstore (UPC)
Marketplace Plaza Catering/Cafeteria
(HSC)
Norris Medical Library (HSC)
Parking Services & Ridesharing (HSC)
Student Health Center (HSC)
Student Activities Center (UPC)
Student Activities Center
USC Card Services (HSC)
USC OT Office (HSC)
Security (HSC)
EMERGENCY ONLY
Normal Business
Security (UPC)
EMERGENCY ONLY
Normal Business

(323) 442-1016
(213) 740-7070
(213) 740-9033
(213) 740-2534
(323) 442-5631
(213) 740-8500
(213) 740-1335
(213) 740-0776
(213) 740-7166
(213) 740-3691
(213) 740-7711
(323) 442-5980
(323) 442-2674
(213) 740-5200
(323) 442-2717
(323) 442-1116
(323) 442-1201
(323) 442-5980
(213) 740-5693
(323) 442-2110
(323) 442-2850
(fax: 442-1540)
(323) 442-1000
(323) 442-1200
(213) 740-4321
(213) 740-6000

Other University publications and offices to supplement this Handbook:


University Catalogue: www.usc.edu/catalogue
Scampus: www.usc.edu/dept/publications/SCAMPUS
Bulletin; Schedule of Classes and Registration Information www.usc.edu/students/enrollment/classes

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA


DIVISION OF OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Office #

FULL TIME FACULTY


Lisa Aziz-Zadeh, PhD (University of California, Los Angeles)
Assistant Professor

HNB B20

Erna Blanche, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA (University of Southern California)


Assistant Professor of Clinical Occupational Therapy
Director of the Doctorate in Occupational Therapy (OTD)

CHP-G-33

Michael Carlson, PhD (University of Southern California)


Research Professor of Occupational Therapy

Phone #
email
213-821-2970
lsa@ucla.edu
442-1857
blanche@usc.edu
mcarlson@usc.edu

Sharon Cermak, EdD, OTR (Boston University)


Professor

CHP-109D

442-2879
cermak@usc.edu

Florence Clark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA (University of Southern California)


Associate Dean and Professor

CHP-131

442-2875
fclark@usc.edu

Linda Fazio, PhD, OTR/L, LPC, FAOTA (University of North Texas)


Professor of Clinical Occupational Therapy
Director of the MA-1 Program

CHP-118

442-2878
fazio@usc.edu

Gelya Frank, PhD (University of California, Los Angeles)


Professor

CHP-113A

442-2885
gfrank@usc.edu

Kevin Groark, PhD (University of California, Los Angeles)


Assistant Professor

CHP-138B

442-1850
groark@usc.edu

Jeanne Jackson, PhD, FAOTA (University of Southern California)


Associate Professor
Director of the Occupational Science Minor

CHP-120

442-2861
jmjackso@usc.edu

Mary Lawlor, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA (Boston University)


Professor
Director of Research

CHP-109F

442-2820
lawlor@usc.edu

Cheryl Mattingly, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)


Professor

CHP-109E

442-2821
mattingl@usc.edu

Julie McLaughlin Gray, PhD, OTR/L (University of Southern California)


Assistant Professor of Clinical Occupational Therapy
Director of the Professional Program

CHP-126

442-2877
jmgray@usc.edu

Bill Morgan, PhD (University of Minnesota, Duluth)


Professor
Director of the PhD Program

GFS-310

213-740-3377

Ann Neville-Jan, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA (New York University)


Associate Professor
Associate Chair - Faculty and Curriculum

CHP-121

442-2884
aneville@usc.edu

Deborah Pitts, MBA, OTR/L (Pepperdine)


Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

CHP-114

442-2855
pittsd@usc.edu

Samia Rafeedie, OTD, OTR/L (University of Southern California)


Assistant Professor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

CHP-125

442-1274
rafeedie@usc.edu

Jaynee Taguchi-Meyer, OTD, OTR/L (University of Southern California)

CHP-116

442-2857

wjmorgan@usc.edu

Assistant Professor of Clinical Occupational Therapy


Director of Fieldwork Education
ADJUNCT FACULTY
Stefanie Bodison, MA, OTR/L
Adjunct Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

taguchi@usc.edu

Office #

Phone # / email

CHP
109 C

stefanieb@ptnmail.org

Sue Bowles, OTD, OTR/L


Adjunct Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

sbowles@ancillarycaresolutions
.com

Cynthia Burt, MA, OTR/L


Adjunct Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

burt@ehs.ucla.edu

Barbara Cherry, PhD


Adjunct Assistant Professor Research

bcherry@exchange.fullerton.ed
u

Remy Chu, MA, OTR/L


Adjunct Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

rchu@ladhs.org

Catherine Crowley, MA, OTR/L


Adjunct Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

CHP
G-33 H

323-442-2810
ccrowley@usc.edu

Lisa Deshaies, MA, OTR/L


Adjunct Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

ldeshaies@dhs.co.la.ca.us

Bridget Ingersoll, MA, OTR/L


Adjunct Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

bdingersoll@gmail.com

Diane Kellegrew, PhD, OTR/L


Adjunct Associate Professor of Clinical Occupational
Therapy

CHP
G-33 A

323-442-3723
kellegre@usc.edu

Kim Morris-Eggleston, MA, OTR/L


Adjunct Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

morrisk@usc.edu

Noosha Niv, PhD


Adjunct Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

noosha23@yahoo.com

Tammy Richmond, MA, OTR/L


Adjunct Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

CHP
G-33 H

tammyric@sbcglobal.net

Pamela Roberts, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA


Adjunct Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

CHP
G-33 H

pamela.roberts@cshs.org

Olga Solomon, PhD


Research Assistant Professor

CHP
138 B

323-442-2154
olgasolo@usc.edu

Shelby Surfas, OTD, OTR/L


Adjunct Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy
Joan Vartanian, BS, OTR/L
Adjunct Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

DISTINGUISHED NON-TEACHING FACULTY


Mary Reilly, EdD, FAOTA (University of California, Los Angeles)
Emeritus Professor

shelbysurfas@gmail.com
CHP G33K

323-442-1776
joanvart@usc.edu

Elizabeth Yerxa, EdD., FAOTA (Boston University)


Distinguished Emeritus Professor and Former Division Chairperson
Jane Goodall, PhD
Distinguished Adjunct Professor
Ruth Zemke, PhD, FAOTA (Iowa State University)
Emeritus Professor

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
Marina Aguilar
Support Staff, Faculty Practice

CSC-133

442-3356
marinaga@usc.edu

Julie Bissell, MA, OTR


Development Officer
Jeanine Blanchard, MA, OTR
Project Manager
Megan Cassidy
Budget/Business Technician
Lucia Florindez
Project Assistant

CHP-128

442-2149
bissell@usc.edu
442-1827
jeanine@usc.edu
442-2486
mcassidy@usc.edu
442-2812
florinde@usc.edu

Sarah Kelly, OTR


Instructor of Clinical Occupational Therapy
Director of Admissions
Kimberly Kelton
Director of Recruitment
Deborah Mandel, MA
Program Manager
Jackie Mardirossian, MA, COTA, ROH
Director of Communications and Development
Stephanie Mielke, OTD, OTR/L
Assistant to the Chair
Laura Sturza
Registration and Enrollment Services
Graduate Student Advisor
Robin Turner
Administrative Assistant to the Fieldwork Coordinator
Janis Wise
Administrative Services Manager
Peter Wittrock
Administrative Assistant II
John Wolcott, PhD
Senior Computer Consultant

CHP-119

442-2822
skelly@usc.edu

CHP-115

442-2859
kkelton@usc.edu
442-3550
dmandel@usc.edu
442-2857
jmardiro@usc.edu
442-2113
smielke@usc.edu
442-1865
sturza@usc.edu

CHP-110
CHP-122
CHP-110

CHP105A
CHP-120
CHP-132
CHP113B
CHP-127
CHP-123
CHP-130
CHP-124

442-1851
rlturner@usc.edu
442-2851
jwise@usc.edu
442-1861
wittrock@usc.edu
442-1539
wolcott@usc.edu

Note: Faculty and staff names are followed by their terminal degree, their practice credential, and for some, the
honorary designation of Fellow of the American Occupational Therapy Association (FAOTA). The honorary
designation of FAOTA is awarded for significant contributions to the profession of occupational therapy.

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA


DIVISION of OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE & OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
at the

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY
DIVISION POLICIES for OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE & OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY STUDENTS
The purpose of this document is to present the policies of the Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy and to
specify the standards of student scholastic performance and professional conduct.
You are encouraged to read this document carefully to gain a precise understanding of divisional expectations. These policies are
intended to ensure nondiscriminatory recruitment and matriculation practices, preservation of student rights, and promotion of a
standard of performance that will qualify you to meet the demands and challenges of practice. Your ability to practice as an
occupational therapist will depend upon the extent of your knowledge and how you apply it to help people of all ages construct healthy,
meaningful, and productive lives. Therefore, the faculty urges you to maintain the highest level of achievement. You are investing in
your future as a professional person and in the success of the profession and these policies have been implemented to assist you.
1. SCHOLASTIC STANDARDS
Student scholastic standards are facilitated by consultation with faculty.
A. Faculty Advisors and Coordinators (2008 - 2009) are:
Dr. Julie McLaughlin-Gray
Seniors and MA II
Dr. Erna Blanche
OTD
Dr. Linda Fazio
MA I
Dr. Jeanne Jackson
Undergraduate OS Minor
Dr. William Morgan
PhD
B. In the first semester, each occupational therapy (OT) student will be assigned a faculty mentor for academic consultation of a
general nature and specifically for evaluation of professional development.
C. Faculty will have regular announced office hours. Matters concerning any course grade or assignment shall be discussed first
with the instructor of that course. Matters of more general academic concern may be discussed with the Director of the
Professional Program or the students faculty mentor.
D. Undergraduate OT students must maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 on all required OT courses in order to continue in the
Masters (MA) program. If an undergraduate students OT grade point average (GPA) falls below 3.0, or if the cumulative
undergraduate GPA falls below 3.0 at the end of the Fall semester of the senior year, the student must apply to be admitted to
the MA program (continuance is not assured).
E. Graduate OT students must maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 on all courses at USC including 400-level courses and a GPA of at
least 3.0 on all courses applied to the MA degree (500-level OT courses and electives) to be eligible for graduation.
F.

A graduate OT student admitted conditionally to the program must achieve a cumulative minimum GPA of 3.0 or better by the
close of the first Fall semester.

G. A graduate OT student who fails to achieve a 3.0 at the close of the first Summer session will be placed on probationary status
and must achieve a cumulative minimum GPA of 3.0 by the close of the first Fall semester.
H. Students who do not maintain the scholastic standards described in (F) and (G) above will be academically disqualified from
the program.
I.

If a student receives a grade of D+, D, D-, or F in any required course in any of the three semesters of the 400-level program;
or C- or lower in a 500-level course, the student will be required to repeat the course but may continue in the program. No
student will be allowed to repeat any course more than once. Graduate students will not receive credit toward their degree for
any course graded C- or below.

2. NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY
The University of Southern California does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, national origin, gender, age, Vietnam
veteran status, disability, sexual orientation, or any other characteristics which may be specified by federal, state, or local law. The
University of Southern California complies with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act
of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 which respectively prohibit discrimination. Students who have an inquiry
regarding these issues or who wish to file a complaint may contact the Office of Equity and Diversity at
http://www.usc.edu/dept/adminops/equity_diversity/ or by phone at (213) 740-5086 or (323) 442-2020.
3. ACADEMIC STANDING
The Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy offers one academic route to a degree in occupational therapy leading
to entry-level practice. To be allowed to practice, students must, in addition to obtaining a Masters degree in occupational therapy:
(1) successfully complete six months (minimum of 940 hours) of Level II fieldwork experience; and (2) successfully complete the
national certification examination monitored by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Inc. (NBCOT). The
NBCOT credential is a pre-requisite to licensure (in those states having licensure requirements).
Students are accepted for study in the Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy under one of four degree routes. We
offer a Bachelor of Science (BS) and a Master of Arts (MA) in Occupational Therapy, a Doctorate in Occupational Therapy (OTD), and
a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Occupational Science. Each route has its own specific educational requirements. Students are
required to abide by the educational requirements and policies applying to the respective route of study chosen.
The requirements of the Bachelor of Science degree include successful completion of all requirements for the BS degree of the USC
College of Letters, Arts and Sciences (LAS), and successful completion of occupational therapy coursework (see page 21 for the
Bachelor of Science route of entry).
Students who choose to leave the educational program with the degree of Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy, or
students who are not permitted to continue to the master of arts program because of unacceptable grade point averages and/or
low scores on the graduate record examination will be restricted from Level II fieldwork and will not be eligible to sit for the
NBCOT practice examination. They may receive the BS degree but will not be permitted to practice. Those seniors who are
admissible to the MA program will receive their BS degree en-route to their MA degree.
The requirements of the Master of Arts degree include successful completion of all required occupational therapy and elective
coursework specific to the masters degree option. Students complete either a comprehensive examination or thesis as a requirement
for the master of arts degree (see pages 22-23 for the two master of arts degree options).
The Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD) and the Doctor of Philosophy in Occupational Science (PhD) are post-professional
degrees. For more information on these degrees see pages 692-693 in the 2008-2009 USC catalogue.
Leave of Absence: A graduate student in good standing, making satisfactory progress toward a degree who must interrupt studies for
compelling reasons may petition for a leave of absence for a stated period, usually one semester. A leave must be approved in advance
by the Dean of the degree conferring unit. Students who fail to apply for a leave of absence are subject to policies governing
continuous enrollment and readmission. Previous acceptance to the program does not guarantee readmission at a later time. See page
84 of the 2008-2009 USC Catalogue for more information.
All requirements for the master's degree must be completed within five calendar years from the date on which the student entered the
program and/or began taking 400-level course work. This time limit includes the period during which the student may be on special
standing.
The faculty reserves the right to discontinue or to place on probation any student whose lack of achievement in any academic
area or whose lack of appropriate professional behavior may indicate potential problems in clinical performance. Once
discontinued, a student may be reinstated only after initiating a faculty review of all intervening activity and performance while
in the program.
PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT DEMONSTRATED BY COMPLIANCE WITH THE SPECIFICATIONS OF THESE
POLICIES IS EXPECTED OF ALL STUDENTS.

4. THE FIELDWORK PROGRAM


Students in Fieldwork Level I and Level II assignments assume professional roles and responsibilities including service and care
delivery to clients and patients. Thus, excellence in performance is critical since it affects patient care.
Level I fieldwork refers to practice experiences embedded in academic coursework and includes observation and beginning hands-on
experience with clients under the supervision of an occupational therapist or other healthcare practitioner or professional. The
emphasis of Level I fieldwork is on developing professional presence and skills and beginning to integrate didactic learning with
practice experience.
Level II fieldwork refers to more advanced hands-on practice experience in which increasing patient care responsibilities are assumed
under the supervision of an occupational therapist. Emphasis is on developing clinical reasoning skills, applying knowledge and skills
in the practice environment, and professionalism.
Successful completion of the equivalent of 24 full-time weeks of Level II fieldwork is required of all students who wish to be eligible
for certification by the NBCOT and, where applicable, state licensing to practice as an occupational therapist. Students who have not
completed all 400 level classes are not eligible to begin Fieldwork Level II.
The standards below apply to students in fieldwork:
A. In compliance with accreditation standards, fieldwork shall offer experience with various groups across the life span, persons
with various psychosocial, physical, and/or developmental performance deficits, and various service delivery models reflective
of current practice in the profession. It is strongly recommended that a student complete Level II fieldwork in two distinctly
different settings.
B. All students are advised to follow instructions given by the Coordinator of Fieldwork Education. Failure to adhere to policies
can and will jeopardize placement at fieldwork sites.
C. No student will be permitted participation in Level I or II fieldwork without health clearance from Student Health, Health
Sciences Campus, including a physical, TB test, Hepatitis B series or waiver, etc. Students must also complete Bloodborne
Pathogens exposure training. Students must obtain and maintain their own health insurance while participating in any level
of fieldwork.
D. No student will be permitted participation in Level I or II fieldwork without certification in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
(CPR). Certification by the American Heart Association is highly recommended and is required by most hospitals and clinics.
Certification by the American Red Cross or other organization is not accepted at most hospitals and some clinics. Online CPR
course completion does not fulfill this requirement.
E. Completion of additional pre-requisites required by Level I or II fieldwork sites may include, but are not limited to:
fingerprinting, criminal background check, drug testing, flu shot, etc. It is the student's personal and financial responsibility
to complete these pre-requisites in a timely manner allowing sufficient time for processing of results prior to the start of any
level of fieldwork. If a student is having difficulty completing the required tasks, he or she must inform the Coordinator of
Fieldwork Education in a timely manner.
F.

Students with disabilities should first register with the USC Disability Services and Programs (DSP) office in order to request
reasonable accommodation(s) for any and all levels of fieldwork. Students must consider the physical and cognitive
requirements of the fieldwork experience when requesting accommodations. Registration is completed online via the DSP
website (http://sait.usc.edu/academicsupport/centerprograms/dsp/home_index.html). Requests for disability-related
reasonable accommodation(s) shall be presented to and discussed with the Coordinator of Fieldwork Education well in
advance of the start of any level of fieldwork to facilitate problem-solving, disclosure as desired, and communication with
fieldwork sites. Ongoing consultation with the DSP office may be helpful and necessary as well.

G. Fieldwork Level I and Level II assignments are made based on faculty judgment of student need and availability of facilities
for assignment. Individual student priorities are respected and considered as conditions permit in making assignments.
Students may not arrange their own fieldwork placements; this is the responsibility of the Coordinator of Fieldwork
Education.
H. If a student is on probationary status at the close of the Fall semester (below required GPA) he or she will not be scheduled for
Level II fieldwork.
I.

No student initiated cancellations or changes will be permitted after assignments have been confirmed except under
extenuating circumstances previously discussed with the Coordinator of Fieldwork Education.

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J.

Students must verify the requirements of their financial aid packages previous to any full-time Level II fieldwork. Full-time
Level II fieldwork (OT 486) may not be covered by financial aid and students must be prepared to cover the costs of tuition for
these 4 units. OT 486 is not required for a degree in occupational therapy at USC. Loan payments may be deferred until
fieldwork is completed according to the requirements of the lending institution. Students are not permitted to initiate Level II
fieldwork unless they are officially registered for the course.

K. A student who is asked to withdraw or willingly withdraws from Level II fieldwork because of failing performance prior to
completion will be considered to have failed that fieldwork experience and a grade of NC (no credit) will be assigned. Should
a student fail or withdraw from a fieldwork experience, the Coordinator of Fieldwork Education will schedule one additional
12-week Level II fieldwork for the student when such fieldwork is available. If a student fails or withdraws from two
fieldwork experiences, the student will not be permitted to repeat it again and will be ineligible for credentialing by NBCOT
and not permitted to practice occupational therapy.
L. The National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) offers a computerized examination for registration as
an occupational therapist following the completion of a masters degree in occupational therapy and the successful completion
of the equivalent of 24 weeks of Level II fieldwork (OT 486). Students initiate the application process after completing all
requirements for graduation and Level II fieldwork (OT 486). Students should use the NBCOT website at www.nbcot.org to
verify application procedures, costs, and corresponding deadlines. For your information: National Board for Certification in
Occupational Therapy, Inc., 12 South Summit Ave., Suite 100, Gaithersburg, MD 20877-4150, (301) 990-7979.
On January 1, 2001, the Occupational Therapy Practice Act took effect in California and, thereafter, a license to practice
occupational therapy in the state was required. Students may access current information of the California Board of
Occupational Therapy at www.bot.ca.gov. NBCOT certification is a prerequisite to licensure in those states having licensure
requirements (including California). For your information: California Board of Occupational Therapy, 2005 Evergreen
Street, Suite 2050, Sacramento, CA 95815. (916) 263-2294
M. Please be aware that a felony conviction may affect a graduates eligibility for the NBCOT certification examination or in
attaining state licensure. Refer to the separate document titled Student Fieldwork Manual for additional information
regarding Level II fieldwork.
5. RIGHTS OF APPEAL
Any student wishing to appeal a grade or the decision of faculty regarding his or her performance or right to continue in the program,
may do so by addressing the Assistant Chairperson for Faculty and Curriculum in writing, indicating details of his or her case and
requesting a hearing with a faculty-student committee to air his or her grievance. This committee is appointed by the Chairperson and
the Assistant Chairperson when such a request is made. Should the problem not be resolved to the mutual satisfaction of the student
and faculty by this method, regular University grievance procedures would pertain. (See most recent SCAMPUS for dispute of
academic evaluation procedures: http://web-app.usc.edu/scampus.)
6. ETHICAL STANDARDS AND ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
Ethical standards are a fundamental component of professionalism. The ultimate objective is mutual respect, enhancement of
performance in the professional role, and enhancement of the division from which one graduates. These standards encompass all the
responsibilities one assumes in relationships with peers, patients, instructors, supervisors, and the public. The basic components of the
ethics involved are truth, equality, honesty, respect, and responsibility for self and others. In keeping with these standards, the Division
of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy encourages your cooperation with the following guidelines in both academic and
fieldwork settings.
A. Reliable and responsible action in following division rules of conduct is expected in any relationship within the division or
between divisions, staff members, students, and others.
B. Thoughtful and courteous behavior to guests of the division, to faculty and staff, and to fellow classmates is expected.
C. Truth and honesty are expected in all dealings and relationships. This includes carrying out assignments/agreements, use of
division or university materials and facilities, and performance in assignments and examinations. The Division of
Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy abides fully by policies regarding plagiarism, cheating, and falsification of
data as published in the USC publications regarding academic integrity. (See also the current SCAMPUS and University
Catalogue) In addition, fabrication of clinical data and falsification of simulated clinical performance records constitute a
violation of academic integrity.
D. Confidentiality of student records and examinations is observed at all times.

11

E. Faculty-student communication is considered vital. Therefore, representatives of all Division of Occupational Science and
Occupational Therapy student organizations are invited to provide input at faculty meetings. Student involvement at this level
insures their influence upon the system.
7. ABSENCES, PUNCTUALITY, AND EXAMINATION MAKE-UP
Students are expected to be punctual and to attend all class meetings unless they are ill or, for other legitimate reasons, cannot attend
class. Students are expected to inform faculty of reasons for absences. If absences are unexcused, faculty need not offer make-up work.
Faculty may elect to penalize tardiness, unexcused absences, and unprofessional behavior (as specified in course syllabi). Make-up
examinations will be given at the faculty's convenience. Under no circumstances will final examinations be rescheduled for students.
8. STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Students requesting academic accommodations based on a disability are required to register with Disability Services and Programs
(DSP) each semester. A letter of verification for approved accommodations can be obtained from DSP when adequate documentation is
filed. Original letters may be delivered to the Coordinator of the Professional Program who will copy to your instructors (original
placed in your file). Or, if you wish, you may hand deliver copies to your instructors. Accommodations cannot be made without
recommendations from Disability Services and Programs and not all recommendations can be accommodated in the Division. With
recommendation, accommodations may be requested for the NBCOT examination. Disability Services and Programs is located on
UPC, Student Union 301; hours are Monday - Friday, 8:30-5:00. Telephone: (213) 740-0776.
9. SUBSCRIBING TO A LIST SERVE
The Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy maintains several list servers for disseminating information to
occupational therapy students in a timely manner. Faculty assume all students have subscribed and therefore are accountable for
any information that is sent out on one of the lists. There is a list for the BS Juniors (OTBSJR-L), those taking 400 level
occupational therapy courses (OT400-L), those taking 500 level occupational therapy courses (OT500-L), OTD students (OTOTD-L),
PhD students (OTPHD-L), and Occupational Scientists (OTOS-L). You are responsible for reading email sent to your USC address. If
you wish to forward your USC email to another account, you must create a forwarding file in your USC email account. For
instructions, please contact USC Information Technology Services (ITS) at 213-740-5555 or online at:
http://www.usc.edu/directories/dept/its.html.
Instructions for subscribing to Division email lists can be found at: http://ot.usc.edu/academics/current-students/list-server/. If you
need assistance please contact Megan Cassidy at mcassidy@usc.edu.
10. COMMENCEMENT
The USC Commencement Ceremony is composed of two parts. There is a University-wide ceremony and general conferring of degrees
and there are also satellite ceremonies of the individual divisions or units at which individual names are called and individual
achievement is recognized. Students participate in the general commencement ceremony and in the Occupational Science and
Occupational Therapy satellite ceremony when they have completed all requirements for their degree (though all masters students may
not have completed fieldwork).
11. DRESS RECOMMENDATIONS
Appropriate mode of dress is reviewed annually to reflect social trends as well as the professional and role demands of students.
Because one objective of the program is to develop professional awareness and to build professional habits, certain standards of dress
and behavior are expected.
A. When students have classes in settings away from University premises, professionally suitable clothing is required.
B. Clothing for Level I and Level II fieldwork must conform to the facility norm and not be in conflict with any agency's policies.
The student is expected to be familiar with these policies and to provide him or herself with appropriate attire. If an agency
does not require uniforms for occupational therapy personnel, suitable conservative street wear should be worn.
C. Jeans and shorts are not appropriate for either off-campus classes or fieldwork.
All Level I and II students are expected to purchase and wear a name tag. In some facilities, students will be expected to wear a white
lab coat with USC-OT student insignia on the sleeve. Name tags and student insignia are available at the HSC bookstore.
12. PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Campus-Based Organizations

12

The Alpha Eta Chapter of Pi Theta Epsilon, national honorary fraternity for occupational therapists, was established at USC in
1990-91 to recognize academic achievement and professional leadership potential. Students are invited to apply to Pi Theta Epsilon
based on their 400-level course grade point averages and ranking in the top 35 percent of the students completing those classes. Pi
Theta Epsilon elects officers following selection of new initiates and sponsors numerous scholarly presentations and activities during
the year to which all occupational therapy and pre-occupational therapy students are invited.
The Occupational Science and Therapy Graduate Student Council (OTSC) includes masters, OTD, and PhD students in the division.
The associations purpose is to foster collegial relationships through academic and social activities.
Occupational Therapy Organizations
Student membership in the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) is required. Various class assignments across
the two year span of the program will require you to access the AOTA Member website, therefore, student membership in AOTA is
essential. You will benefit personally and professionally from the publications and the member services. The profession will also
benefit from your membership. Together, we can expand lobbying efforts on Capitol Hill to address such things as continued coverage
of occupational therapy in all Medicare benefits; ensure that children with disabilities have consistent and expanding access to OT
services; and assure the future of expanding practice areas. Apply on-line at www.aota.org, click on Member Services.
Support for the Occupational Therapy Association of California (OTAC) is highly recommended. The state associations work in
tandem with AOTA but are focused on specific areas of interest and concerns of the state. Each state association has a local chapter
where you can work closely with other members in your vicinity. You may apply for membership in OTAC at
http://www.otaconline.org and click on Membership Application.
13. CENTENNIAL STUDENT RESIDENCE (OT HOUSE)
The innovation of special interest housing floors for USC occupational therapy students was first established at Vista Apartments in
1994 to provide occupational therapy graduate and undergraduate students with a comfortable living space to study and socialize
together. Since then, this housing opportunity has been the residence of choice for approximately one-third of entering occupational
therapy students. Presently located in the Centennial Apartments on the corner of Portland Street and Adams Boulevard, just north of
the University Park Campus, the building offers fully furnished, air-conditioned, two-bedroom apartments with kitchens, balconies, and
common spaces also enjoyed by other graduate residents who are not occupational therapy majors.
USC Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy Associate Dean, Dr. Florence Clark, describes the OT House as a
special residential community that supports developing occupational therapy practitioners in achieving academically and in balancing
work, rest, and play. In consultation with students and faculty members, an occupational therapy graduate student residential advisor
(RA), along with a residential faculty/staff fellow, plans and coordinates educational and social activities.
Following in the early 20th century tradition of occupational therapy settlement homes community sites where occupational therapy
services were provided in impoverished areas the residence features a volunteer service component. The OT House has a long history
of involvement with local community-based institutions and projects, including painting colorful murals near USC, hosting blood
drives, starting a recycling program, and collaborating in USCs Kid Watch program. Additionally, a new program has recently been
launched that aims to enable local middle school children to participate in various meaningful activities. From exploring arts and
crafts to yoga, this popular weekly event and dinner held in the lounge of Centennial encourages residents to take a break from their
studies, build lasting friendships with each other and the children and, if they desire, practice their skills of leadership by planning and
implementing a weeks activity based on their own personal hobbies or interests. In 2006, the OT House and its staff were recognized
by the Department of Residential Life at USC for the community it has built with its residents and its highly-attended programs that
contribute to the community surrounding USC.
Inter-campus tram service provides residents with transportation to and from USCs University Park Campus (UPC) as well as the
Health Sciences Campus (HSC). The proximity of the University Park Campus provides occupational therapy students living in
Centennial Apartments with easy access to the many educational, social, and cultural activities housed there. Additionally, because of
its close proximity to the Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy Center for Occupation and Lifestyle Redesign, located on
nearby Hoover Street, the occupational therapy residents of Centennial may enjoy activities and private study time at the Center and its
third floor library and computer lab.
BASIC EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY and CURRICULUM DESIGN of the DIVISION
of OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE and OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

13

The design of the USC Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy professional academic program and fieldwork provides for
meaningful sequencing of content, continuing, suitably graded opportunities for clinical applications, and optimum utilization of
faculty expertise. The program is responsive to the rapidly changing community demand and need for occupational therapy services.
1. CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK FOR ALL PROGRAMS OF STUDY IN THE DIVISION OF OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE AND
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
The Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy developed its mission to reflect the philosophy of occupational
therapy as well as to promote and enhance the philosophy and mission of USC.
The Mission of the University
The University of Southern California (USC) is located near the heart of Los Angeles and is one of the nations leading private
research universities. The central mission of the University of Southern California is the development of human beings and society as
a whole through the cultivation and enrichment of the human mind and spirit. The primary means by which the mission is
accomplished are teaching, research, artistic creation, professional practice, and selected forms of public service. The first priority of
faculty and staff is the education of students in the classroom, studio, laboratory, seminar room, on the playing field, as well as
where students live (University of Southern California, Catalogue 2008-2009, p. 14). USC is committed to the philosophy that this
educational mission is most effectively carried out through the integration of liberal and professional learning in a context that
encourages the creation of new knowledge and is strongly committed to academic freedom. USC places a premium on research and
scholarship and also on public leadership and public service. A supportive and pluralistic community at USC sustains university
service activities, not only for the surrounding Los Angeles urban environment but for the nation and globally (The Role and Mission
of the University of Southern California, adopted by USC Board of Trustees, February, 1993:
http://www.usc.edu/about/factbook/strategic_priorities).
The Mission of the Division
The mission of the USC Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy is to maximize the potential of people to
construct healthy, satisfying, and productive lives by generating knowledge of value to society, advancing the profession, and educating
generations of practitioners, researchers, and leaders.
The Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapys mission reflects and supports the Universitys mission to develop
human beings and society as a whole through the cultivation and enrichment of the human mind and spirit. The Division occupies a
strong presence on both the Health Sciences Campus and the University Park Campus, strongly reflecting the universitys strategic
plan and initiatives encouraging excellence in professional programs that involve innovative collaborations, interdisciplinary
research, and education; creative programs that build upon the local, urban environment and also extend internationally. Through its
multiple degree programs, the Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy supports the Mission of the University in
its attention to teaching, development of new knowledge through faculty and student research and scholarship, and service to the
community. The vision of the division is to move occupational science and occupational therapy into the 21 st century by expanding the
concepts, services, and outcomes of these disciplines. We share the American Occupational Therapy Associations Centennial Vision,
which foresees that by the year 2017, occupational therapy will be a powerful, widely recognized, science-driven, and evidence-based
profession with a globally connected and diverse workforce meeting societys occupational needs.
Philosophy
The philosophy guiding the content and organization of the curriculum is based on the organizing concepts of occupational science
which was developed as an academic discipline in 1989 by faculty in the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational
Therapy at USC (Clark & Larson, 1993). Occupational science is the study of engagement in daily occupations in relation to health,
well-being, and function among individuals and groups (Yerxa et al., 1990). This evolving science focuses on the form, function, and
meaning involved in the doing of everyday activities. Occupational science brings a wide interdisciplinary framework to
understanding human performance and the capacity for positive change. It draws on the biomedical sciences, social sciences, the arts,
and humanities in interesting and creative ways, in order to more comprehensively understand the complex interaction between the
person and his or her surrounding environment.
The curriculum framework of the Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy maintains core concepts and goals of
occupational science as its philosophy and organizes the various programs of study around developing knowledge and research in
occupational science (See Figure 1). Specifically, coursework in all programs centers around a belief in the significance of occupation
to individual and public health, the individual and personal characteristics of occupation, the multidimensional and dynamic nature of
occupation, and the need to advance both academic and public knowledge regarding occupation and its qualities (Clark et al., 1991;
Wilcock, 1998; Zemke & Clark, 1996).
2.

THE CURRICULUM DESIGN FOR THE ENTRY-LEVEL PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM OF STUDY IN THE DIVISION OF

14

OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY


The curriculum of the professional program of study in occupational therapy is informed by several organizing ideas that shape both
the design and content of students learning experiences (see Figure 2). These are:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Occupational Science
Dynamic Systems Theory
Evidence-Based Decision-Making
The Integration Of Medical And Social Models Of Disability

Concepts from dynamic systems theory have been used to inform many disciplines about the complexity of human behavior and the
process of change over time in complex systems (Chamberlain & Butz, 1998; Geert, 1991; Kamm, Thelen, & Jensen, 1990; Kelso &
Tuller, 1984). The influence of dynamic systems theory within the occupational therapy curriculum at USC is most evident both in the
way in which students learn about the complexity of occupation and occupational change, as well as the way in which the coursework
is sequenced to develop knowledge and skills over time.
Students learn principles of dynamic systems theory, through review of occupational science literature, in order to better understand the
phenomenon of occupation and the various knowledge areas that need to be addressed in developing multidisciplinary theories about
occupation (Clark & Larson, 1993, p.51). They discuss and analyze the complexity of the person/environment interaction and the
way in which occupational experiences may create change in the human systems behavior. They learn how to design therapeutic
occupations. These analyses are also discussed in relation to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health
(WHO, 2001a) to help students locate occupational therapy and occupational science ideas within international language and concepts
of health.
Based on a dynamic systems perspective, which purports that change in complex systems is frequently nonlinear in nature, coursework
is also sequenced to develop knowledge in a nonlinear fashion. Content and assignments are designed so that students deepen their
understanding of occupation, occupational dysfunction and restoration of occupational health in more of a spiral-like or recursive
manner.
The other three organizing ideas, occupational science, evidence-based decision-making, and the integration of medical and social
models of disability, are reflected in four interrelated emphases/themes that permeate the professional program coursework and also
influence instructional methods: Professional Leadership, Occupation, Clinical Reasoning, and Consumer-Oriented Care. While
these emphases are described below in isolation, they are not easily isolated within the curriculum. Again, based on a dynamic
perspective, students develop these skills in parallel. They are reflected at all levels of coursework and in numerous and varied
assignments related to multiple areas of occupational therapy practice.

15

Figure 1. Incorporation of Occupational Science Throughout All Levels of the USC Curriculum

Students
Grounded
design
in and
occupational
develop occupationscience,
centered
students
programs
choose to
that
become
incorporate
advanced
occupational
practitioners,therapy
policy
and
andadministrative
occupational
leaders,
science
teachers, or
clinical researchers.

Students do
research and
scholarly
Investigation
investigation of the
form, function and
meaning of
occupation

OTD Program
Occupation-centered
OTD Program
expert practitioner,
Occupation-centered
administrator,
educator,
program development
or researcher

PhD Program
Scholarly investigation
of occupation

Students master clinical competence in


occupational therapy, basic knowledge
and investigation of occupation-centered
practice as it builds on occupational
science
Professional Program
Year 2
MA
Program
for OTRs
MA
I Program
for
Occupation-centered
OTR
practice
Occupation-centered
practice

Students learn the foundations of occupational


therapy and explore the basic tenets of occupational
science

Professional Program
Year 1
BS enroute to MA
Foundations of OT
Basics of OS

16

Figure 2. USC Occupational Therapy Professional Program Curriculum Design

Organizing Ideas:
Occupational Science
Dynamic Systems Theory
Evidence-Based Decision Making
Integration of Medical and Social
Models of Disability
Becoming educated,
professional leaders

Understanding
occupation through
analysis and experience

Curriculum
Content and
Design

Developing clinical
reasoning through
active learning and
problem-solving

17

Understanding and
respecting consumers
perspectives

Product:
Life-long
Learners and
Leaders in
Occupational
Therapy

Discussion of Themes
Becoming Educated as Professional Leaders
Meeting the divisions mission to advance occupational therapy and occupational science into the 21 st century, the professional
program at USC strives to prepare leaders in the field of occupational therapy, leaders who are knowledgeable about occupational
science and who can contribute to practice breakthroughs in non-traditional, as well as traditional settings. Bennis (1989) describes
leaders as individuals who are innovative and original in their thinking (p.45). He purports that, rather than simply maintain or
accept the status quo, leaders are those who are able to create and develop. They challenge the way things are. According to Bennis,
leadership skills are founded in a dynamic education that fosters understanding over memorizing (p.45).
Bennis ideas are reflected in the educational methods used in the Division, in which instructors foster critical thinking through a
strong emphasis on the theoretical background informing both occupational therapy practice and concepts of occupational science.
Understanding Occupation Through Analysis and Experience
The combined coursework in the professional program is also designed to develop professional leaders who will advance occupational
therapy practice and occupational science by a pervasive emphasis on occupation-centered practice and infusion of occupational
science throughout the curriculum. In developing their abilities to design and implement occupation-centered interventions, students
learn basic concepts in order to understand and analyze the relationship between occupation and health through experience. They
examine their own occupational profiles and learn to analyze occupation for its health benefits and potential impact as a therapeutic
modality.
Developing Clinical Reasoning and Evidence-Based Decision-Making
Mattingly and Fleming (1994a), in their landmark study of clinical reasoning in occupational therapy, surmised that while a
grounding in theory is essential for expert practice(it) does not guarantee such practice (Mattingly & Fleming, 1994b, p.9). The
strong emphasis on theory within the professional program curriculum here at USC is therefore complemented by development of
other forms of clinical reasoning and evidence-based decision-making. Learning activities are structured to give opportunities to
develop students skills in the multiple forms of reasoning used by expert clinicians.
Students gain experience and skills in procedural reasoning, for example, through application of the theoretical models to clinical
cases. Opportunities to begin to develop skills in interactive reasoning, related to the face-to-face encounters between patient and
therapist (Mattingly & Fleming, 1994a, p.17), are provided via extensive in-class small group discussions with individualized
feedback, and in small group and dyad activities. The seeds for skills and habits in conditional reasoning, a more complex form of
reasoning in which the clinician examines the clients whole condition attempting to situate the clients illness experience within his
or her life-world, are planted in students via their exposure to multiple models of performance(Mattingly & Fleming, 1994a, p.18).
These models of performance examine human occupation in its complex relationship to the surrounding environment and conditions,
as well as the lived experiences of people with disabilities. These lived experiences are frequently presented and discussed in all of the
courses via storytelling and discussion of the process of storymaking (Clark, 1993).
Contemporary clinical reasoning in occupational therapy and throughout the medical community is also informed by evidence-based
decision-making (Law, 2002). Coursework and classroom activities are structured to develop beginning skills required in evidencebased practice, namely review of research, self-directed learning, and experiences in critical thinking and problem solving (Forrest &
Miller, 2001). Deliberate selection of textbooks and other course readings encompassing evidence for treatment decisions and
methods, as well as in-class analysis of methods that are less supported, lay the groundwork for evidence-based practice. All courses
provide in-class opportunities to analyze cases and discuss intervention strategies. Evidence-based decision making is a dynamic
process that is congruent with the divisions overall mission to develop leaders by empowering students to establish themselves as selfdirected, life-long learners.
The evidence-based practice process is also supported by the process of professional self-reflection (Pollock & Rochon, 2002).
Students in the professional program are provided with multiple opportunities to develop their skills and habits as self-reflective
practitioners by beginning as self-reflective students.
Understanding and Respecting Consumers Perspectives
Fundamentals of clinical reasoning and evidence-based practice are also reflected in the curriculums emphasis on client-centered care
(Law, 2002). Learning to understand the clients perspective is essential to development of clinical reasoning skills in occupational
therapy (Ranka & Chapparo, 1995). Because occupational therapy clinical reasoning should be centered on occupation, representing a
top-down perspective, the client must be an active collaborator in the process (Bridge & Twible, 1997). Based on the narrative
reasoning described above and the divisions efforts at merging both medical and social perspectives on disability, students have
multiple opportunities to read and hear the voices and experiences of individuals with disabilities. Through guest speakers and

18

videotaped presentations clients and families share their experiences. Students read books and write reflective papers on the personal
experiences of various individuals with disabilities.
Merging the Classroom with the Practice Community: The Level II Fieldwork
The Level II fieldwork (O.T. 486) provides the entry level professional program students with the introduction to practice that
encourages them to begin the integration of entry-level practice knowledge and skills with the themes of the curriculum, most
particularly with the tenets of occupational science.
Students continue their education following the three semesters of the professional program with another year of coursework that
challenges them to develop their clinical practice knowledge, their research base, and their knowledge of occupational science.
Traditionally, students elect to do full-time fieldwork during the Summer previous to their second year and then the Summer following
it. Students who have not completed all 400 level courses may not begin Level II Fieldwork.
References
Bennis, W. (1989). On Becoming a Leader. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Book.
Bridge, C. E., & Twible, R. L. (1997). Clinical reasoning: Informed decision making for practice. In C. Christiansen & C. Baum (Eds.), Enabling
Function and Well-Being (2nd ed., pp. 159-179). Thorofare, NJ: SLACK Incorporated.
Chamberlain, L. L., & Butz, M. R. (Eds.). (1998). Clinical Chaos: A Therapist's Guide to Nonlinear Dynamics and Therapeutic Change. Ann Arbor,
MI: Braun-Brumfield.
Clark, F. (1993). Occupation embedded in real life: Interweaving occupational science and occupational therapy. American Journal of Occupational
Therapy, 47(12), 1067-1078.
Clark, F., & Larson, E. A. (1993). Developing an academic discipline: The science of occupation. In H. Hopkins & H. Smith (Eds.), Willard and
Spackman's occupational therapy (pp. 44-57). Philadelphia: Lippincott.
Clark, F. A., Parham, D., Carlson, M. E., Frank, G., Jackson, J., Pierce, D., Wolfe, R. J., & Zemke, R. (1991). Occupational science: Academic
innovation in the service of occupational therapy's future. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 45, 300-310.
Forrest, J. L., & Miller, S. A. (2001). Integrating evidence-based decision making into allied health curricula. Journal of Allied Health, 30(4), 215222.
Geert, v. (1991). A dynamic dsystems model of cognitive and language growth. Psych Rev, 98(3).
Kamm, K., Thelen, E., & Jensen, J. L. (1990). A dynamical systems approach to motor development. Physical Therapy, 70, 763-771.
Kelso, J., & Tuller, B. (1984). A dynamical basis for action systems. In M. Gazzaniga (Ed.), Handbook of Cognitive Neuroscience (pp. 231-356).
New York: Plenum Publishing.
Law, M. (2002). Introduction to Evidence-Based Practice. In M. Law (Ed.), Evidence-Based Rehabilitation: A Guide to Practice (pp. 3-12).
Thorofare, NJ: SLACK Incorporated.
Mattingly, C., & Fleming, M. H. (1994a). Clinical reasoning: Forms of inquiry in a therapeutic practice. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company.
Mattingly, C., & Fleming, M. H. (1994b). Giving language to practice. In C. Mattingly & M. H. Fleming (Eds.), Clinical reasoning: Forms of
inquiry in a therapeutic practice (pp. 3-21). Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company.
Organization, W. H. (2001a). ICF: International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Geneva: World Health Organization.
Organization, W. H. (2001b). ICIDH-2: International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Geneva: World Health Organization.
Pollock, N., & Rochon, S. (2002). Becoming an evidence-based practitioner. In M. Law (Ed.), Evidence-Based Rehabilitation (pp. 31-46). Thorofare,
NJ: SLACK Incorporated.
Ranka, J., & Chapparo, C. (1995). Teaching clinical reasoning to occupational therapy students. In J. Higgs & M. Jones (Eds.), Clinical Reasoning in
the Health Professions (pp. 213-223). Oxford: Butterworkth-Heinemann Ltd.
Wilcock, A. A. (1998). An Occupational Perspective of Health. Thorofare, New Jersey: SLACK Incorporated.
Yerxa, E., Clark, F., Frank, G., Jackson, J., Parham, D., Pierce, D., Stein, C., & Zemke, R. (1990). An introduction to occupational science: A
foundation for occupational therapy in the 21st century. Occupational Therapy in Health Care, 6, 1-17.
Zemke, R., & Clark, F. (Eds.). (1996). Occupational science: The evolving discipline. Philadelphia: F. A. Davis.

3. CURRICULUM SEQUENCE FOR THE PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM: SEE FIGURE 3.

19

Figure 3. Professional Program Curriculum Sequence


(Please read from bottom of page to top)

OT 588 (4)*
Evidence Based
Practice

OT 510 (4)*
Qualitative Analysis of
Occupational Data

OT 500/590 (2-4)
Clinical Pathway or
Other Elective

OT 500/590 (2-4)
Clinical Pathway or
Other Elective

OT 550 (4)*
Foundations of Occupational
Science

OT 506 (4)*
The Making of a
Profession

OT 507 (4)*
Daily Dilemmas in
Practice

OT 500/590
(2-4)
Clinical Pathway or
Other Elective

Semester 5Fall Semester 6Spring

Semester 7Summer

OT 486 (2-2)
Clinical Internship with Seminar
Level II Fieldwork

*Sequence of core courses subject to change!

OT 467 (3)
Advanced
Occupational
Therapy Theory Pediatrics

OT 468 (3)
Advanced
Occupational
Therapy Theory Adolescence,
Adulthood &
Aging

OT 485 (2)
Occupational
Science &
Occupational
Therapy

LEVEL I FIELDWORK (2 weeks)


OT 415 (4)
Medical Lectures

OT 420 (4)
Developmental
Concepts
and Occupation

OT 452 (4)
Occupational Therapy
Theory & Practice Physical Disabilities

OT 453 (4)
Occupational Therapy
Theory and Practice Psychosocial
Dysfunction

OT 463 (2)
Occupational
Therapy Skills
Theory II

LEVEL I FIELDWORK (1 week)


OT 440 (2)
Foundations of Occupation:
Kinesiology

OT 441 (2)
Foundations of Occupation:
Neurology

OT 405 (4)
Occupational Therapy Skills Theory I

ORIENTATION TO THE PROGRAM: Curriculum Design And Sequence;


Introduction To Occupational Therapy And Occupational Science
PREREQUISITES: Anatomy, Physiology, Psychology, Abnormal Psychology,

20

Semester 3Spring

OT 466 (3)
Advanced
Occupational
Therapy Theory
Physical
Disabilities

Semester 2Fall

OT 465 (3)
Advanced
Occupational
Therapy Theory Psychosocial

Semester 1Summer

OT 464 (4)
Occupational
Therapy
Skills Theory III

Semester 4Summer

OT 486 (2-2)
Clinical Internship with Seminar
Level II Fieldwork

Pre-requisites

Life Span/Human Development, Anthropology, or Sociology, Medical Terminology


GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

(See Catalogue for Course Descriptions)

START HERE

Students enter the occupational therapy program with a liberal arts base including natural (biological) and social (behavioral) science
to which their own interests and skill in human work/play activities are added. USC General Education requirements structure this
base. .

21

4. THE LENGTH AND REQUIREMENTS OF THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM


For undergraduate (senior) students entering the Summer following their junior year, there is one Summer session semester, one Fall
semester, one Spring semester all of which are devoted entirely to occupational therapy studies. Undergraduate students may also elect
the option of taking four occupational therapy courses during their junior year of study: OT 405, OT 420, OT 440, and OT 441. These
students would then join the continuing class.
A. SEQUENCE OF COURSES FOR OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY SENIORS PURSUING THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE
ENROUTE TO THE MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE:
Course #

Units

Title

PSS

OT 405
OT 440
OT 441

4
2
2

OT Skills Theory I
Foundations of Occupation/Kinesiology
Foundations of Occupation/Neurology

Fall (first professional year)

OT 415
OT 420
OT 452
OT 453
OT 463

4
4
4
4
2

Medical Lectures
Developmental Concepts and Occupation
OT Theory & Practice/Physical Disabilities
OT Theory & Practice/Psychosocial Dysfunction
OT Skills Theory II

Spring (first professional year)

OT 464
OT 465
OT 466
OT 467
OT 468
OT 485

4
3
3
3
3
2

OT Skills Theory III/Community Assignment


Advanced OT Theory: Psychosocial Dysfunction
Advanced OT Theory: Physical Disability
Advanced OT Theory: Pediatrics
Advanced OT Theory: Geriatrics
Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

Summer (second professional year)

OT 486

1-2

Clinical Internship with Seminar*

(* assuming students are admissible to the MA program)


Students entering as seniors will continue to year II of the M.A. program as described on page 22.
The Masters program for persons with a bachelors degree in another discipline (MA II) requires the same sixteen months of
occupational therapy preparation plus graduate courses and completion of thesis or comprehensive examination.

22

B. SEQUENCE OF COURSES FOR OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY MA STUDENTS


Students in the MA program have the option of taking the comprehensive examination or completing thesis. All students are required
to take 4 units of electives in addition to the 20 units of 500 level core courses. The 4 units may be taken within the OT division at the
500 level or above, or outside the division at the 400 level or above. Students taking the comprehensive examination must take an
additional 8 units of OT electives at the 500 level or above. Students completing a thesis take two additional semesters of OT 594 (a
and b) after completing the core courses. Completing a thesis may require one or more semesters beyond the Summer of year 2.

Graduate students may not elect to take courses P/NP (PASS/FAIL)!


Sequence of Core Courses in Year 2 is subject to change!
Course #

Units

Title

PSS

OT 405
OT 440
OT 441

4
2
2

OT Skills Theory I
Foundations of Occupation/Kinesiology
Foundations of Occupation/Neurology

Fall

OT 415
OT 420
OT 452
OT 453
OT 463

4
4
4
4
2

Medical Lectures
Developmental Concepts and Occupation
OT Theory & Practice/Physical Disabilities
OT Theory & Practice/Psychosocial Dysfunction
OT Skills Theory II

Spring

OT 464
OT 465
OT 466
OT 467
OT 468
OT 485

4
3
3
3
3
2

OT Skills Theory III: Community Assignment


Advanced OT Theory: Psychosocial Dysfunction
Advanced OT Theory: Physical Disability
Advanced OT Theory: Pediatrics
Advanced OT Theory: Geriatrics
Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

Summer

OT 486

1-2

Clinical Problems in OT

Fall

OT 506
OT 507
OT 550
Elective

4
4
4
0-4

The Making of a Profession*


Daily Dilemmas in Practice*
Foundations of Occupational Science*
Elective Course (may be taken outside Division at 400-level or higher)**

Spring

OT 510
OT 588
Elective

4
4
0-8

Qualitative Analysis of Occupational Data*


Evidence Based Practice*
Elective Course (may be taken outside Division at 400-level or higher)**

Summer (MAII only)

OT 486

1-2

Clinical Internship with Seminar

YEAR 1 (MAII Students)

YEAR II (MAII, MAI)

*These classes meet on University Park Campus and may have an evening section.
** See descriptions of potential electives from list of Pathways to Excellence courses which follow. If completing a thesis, student may
wait to take elective in the Spring.

23

C. MA GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION OPTION
24 units as above in Yr II plus 8 units of OT electives (see courses listed below subject to change) = 32 units.
Fall/Spring
Fall/Spring
Fall
Fall
Fall/Spring
Fall/Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
Fall/Spring

OT 500

OT 555
OT564
OT571
OT572
OT 575

offered
4
4
4
4
2

Clinical Problems in Occupational Therapy


1-8
Directed Research
OT560
4
Contemporary issues in school-based practice
OT573
4
Hand Rehabilitation
OT574
4
Enhancing Motor Control for Occupation
OT583
4
Lifestyle Redesign
OT 505
2
Seminar in Occupation Therapy (review for NBCOT)
OT 551
4
Human Adaptation and Disability not currently
OT 590

2-4

Implementation of the Advocacy Mode not currently offered


Sensory Integration
Assistive Technology
Ergonomics
Dysphagia across the lifespan
OT 500/590
4
Independent Study; Clinical Experience or Research

Students may take the written comprehensive examination in Fall or Spring after completion of the 5 required 500-level courses.
Graduate students must be registered for every Fall and Spring semester until graduation. If not registering for other courses, a student
must register for GRSC 810 to maintain full time status or OT 590 for part time status.
THESIS OPTION
24 units as above in Yr II plus 4 units OT 594 Thesis = 28 units.
After completing all coursework by Spring semester, register for OT 594a in Fall and 594b in Spring and then OT 594z Fall or Spring
as needed until completion.
D. CLINICAL AND RESEARCH ELECTIVE COURSES

Pathways to Excellence:

Pathways to Excellence courses are key building blocks in creating programs of study with specific
occupational therapy specialty areas, enabling graduate students to both broaden and deepen their knowledge and expertise in contemporary
practice areas.

4 unit Pathway Courses: These courses, offered variably in Fall and Spring semesters, enable graduate students to
broaden and deepen their knowledge and expertise in contemporary practice areas.
o 2 unit Pathway Courses: These courses are offered either during the first half of the semester or the second half of
the semester.

Clinical Experiences (OT 500; A, B, C) include participation in various clinical/health settings in the community. May be
taken for 2 to 4 units.

Research Experiences (OT 590) include participation in research projects with USC community partners. May be taken for
2 to 6 units.

Independent Study (OT 590) enables students to research a topic of their choice, supervised by a USC faculty member. May
be taken for 2 to 6 units
Other Options: Students may take 4 units outside the OT department at the 400 hundred level or higher.
o

24

PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM (Year 2) 500 level Electives


Fall 2009 Pathways to Excellence
Course
OT 560
Contemporary
Issues in
School-Based
Practice
(4 units)

Description
This course is open to ALL students. This interactive seminar provides in-depth learning
experiences to foster occupational therapy practice for children with disabilities across
the age range. Contemporary topics in early intervention, childrens mental health issues
and school-based practice from preschool through high-school transition will be included.
Course content includes guest speakers, case studies, and hands-on evaluation and
intervention labs with children enrolled in community programs, successful collaborative
strategies, and legal issues.
This course is limited to the TOTS grant participants and will focus on development of
competencies related to that project.

Day/Time
Wednesday
9:00
11:50 AM

Location
HSC
CHP 112

Instructor
Julie
Bissell

Wednesday
1-3:50 PM

HSC
CHP 111

Diane
Kellegrew

OT 573
Hand
Rehabilitation
(4 units)

This course will explore client-centered and occupation-based evaluation and treatment
for individuals with common hand disorders. Through lecture, lab, small group work,
and class discussions, this course will emphasize functional anatomy of the hand and will
promote sound clinical reasoning skills based on consideration of key anatomical
principles and patients occupation goals. Topics will include clinical examination,
wound healing, scar management, physical agent modalities, splinting, peripheral nerve
injury, arthritis, tendon injury, and other hand conditions.

Tuesday
6-8:50 PM

VKC
102

Lisa
Deshaies

OT 574
Enhancing
Motor
Control
(4 Units)

This course provides the student with an in depth understanding of principles and
methods for remediation of motor control impairments following upper motor neuron
lesions. Through journal article review, assigned readings, seminar discussions, and
laboratory experiences, students will review theories and concepts of motor control and
motor learning, typical motor control problems associated with hemiplegia, basic
anatomy and biomechanics of the upper extremity, and various intervention options.
With supervision and instructor feedback, students will practice functional movement
analysis, assessment and handling skills based upon the Neurodevelopmental Treatment
Approach (NDT), and application of motor remediation to occupation-based intervention.
NOTE: In addition to formal class meetings, students will attend and participate in
a weekly, two-hour, out-patient occupational therapy group (for stroke patients) at
Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center, including clinical observation
and provision of treatment. CPR certification and all human resources, health, safety
and HIPAA clearances are required.
This course is an elective offered to students in the Masters in Occupational therapy and
the clinical Doctorate in Occupational Therapy programs. The course content covers an
analysis of the concepts and principles of universal design and the benefits of the
approach for people with disabilities and for all individuals. Students will be introduced
to the history of universal design, the broad range of human abilities, and numerous real
world examples of designs that satisfy the principles. The course will encompass
universal design in the built environment including accessibility, the design of adaptive
equipment and product design as well as universal design for learning with individuals
with disabilities. The occupational therapists unique perspective and role on a
multidisciplinary team of professionals are emphasized. This content builds upon the
theoretical knowledge and practical skills gained in the professional programs in
occupational therapy at the University of Southern California.

Monday
1:304:20 PM

Rancho
Los
Amigos
Rehab.
Center
Downey
CA

Julie
McLaughl
in Gray

OT 560
(4 units)
TOTS
GRANT
STUDENTS
ONLY

OT 576
Universal
Design
[4 Units]

Additional 2
hours beyond
above (See
note)

Wednesday
5:30 - 8:20
PM

UPC

TBA

Fall Electives
Clinical Experiences (OT 500 A, B or C)
Course

Description

Day/Time

25

Location

Instructor

OT 500
Evidence-Based
Practice in Public
Mental Health
(4 Units)
Interview Required.
Students must be
completing part-time
Level II fieldwork
with Pacific Clinics.
OT 500
USC University
Hospital
(2 or 4 Units)
Enrollment limited to
5 students.

OT 500
USC Occupational
Therapy Faculty
Practice
(2-4 units)
Interview Required.
Enrollment limited to
4 students.

OT 500
Optimal Living with
Multiple Sclerosis
(2-4 Units)
Interview Required.

There are a growing number of evidence-based mental health interventions


available to occupational therapists and other mental health clinicians. There
is also a growing recognition throughout the country that these interventions
are rarely implemented in usual care mental health settings. This is coupled
with increasing pressure on public systems and agencies to introduce
evidence-based interventions. This course will require the student to
participate in twice-monthly seminars that will focus on evidence-based
practices, facilitators and barriers to implementation EBPs, intended system
changes implementation of California Mental Health Services Act, and the
use of recovery-oriented services. Enrollment in this course is limited to
students who are participating in the Evidence-Based fieldwork experience
developed in collaboration with the USC School of Social Work and Pacific
Clinics.
Students will be mentored in occupational therapy treatment with patients on
the inpatient psychiatric unit and on the acute medical/surgical floors. The
students experience may include observation of skilled therapists, hands-on
treatment of clients, and searching research literature for evidence to support
a clinical course of action. This is a good opportunity for those students who
feel they have had limited experience in traditional practice settings. The
days and times will be determined by the instructor and student. NOTE:
University Hospital has strict requirements for all people working or
taking classes there. EVERYONE must have a drug screen, a
background check and view the Hospitals HIPAA video prior to
beginning. Please be advised that when you sign up for this class, there
are additional costs involved as follows: Background check through
LiveScan is approximately $59. The drug screen is an additional $40
45 or more, depending on the lab used. Please see Robin Turner in the
department for additional information and to schedule a time to view the
HIPAA video.

Pacific
Clinics
Wednesday
9:00-11:30
AM

Pacific
Clinics,
Pasadena

Deborah
Pitts

To be
arranged with
Instructor.

USC
University
Hospital

Don
Gordon

Students may participate in any of the following activities--assist with the


USC Lifestyle Redesign Weight Loss, Lifestyle Redesign for the College
Student and/or Pain Management Program; observation and documentation of
the Executive Health Consultation; development of marketing materials
and/or marketing activity for any of the above programs; module and/or
content research and development for any of the above programs; outcomes
research for any of the above programs; filing insurance forms and speaking
to insurance representatives for reimbursement for any of the above
programs; support work for any of the above programs or for the general
practice activities. There is flexibility in scheduling hours at the practice
according to the best days and times for students (8 hrs./wk. for 4 units; 4
hrs./wk. for 2 units).
This is a 12 week program in collaboration with the National Multiple
Sclerosis Society and the USC Divisions of Occupational Science and
Occupational Therapy, Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy and the
Department of Neurology. This program helps people with MS who are
experiencing physical changes which are interfering with their daily routine.
The OT student works one-on-one with 1-2 participants in educating them on
how to structure a health promoting routine, increase life satisfaction, and
expand functional mobility. The OT student will also experience running a
group module; collaborate with PT students; and, in general, put knowledge
to action in a supported environment. This is a unique and exciting program
for students to gain clinical expertise and experience in a Lifestyle Redesign
intervention. Your instructor will work closely with you to develop and hone
your clinical application and skills and help you transition to the working
world.
NOTE: 2 units; Fridays 9 AM 1 PM.
4 units; Fridays 9 AM 1 PM, PLUS 4 hours M, T, W, or Th.

To be
arranged with
Instructor.

USC
OS/OT
Faculty
Practice

Camille
Dieterle

See note.

USC
OS/OT
Faculty
Practice
&
CHP-139

Karen
McNulty

26


Fall Electives
Directed Research (OT 590)
Course
OT 590
Rancho Los
Amigos National
Rehabilitation
Center
(2-4 Units)
Enrollment limited
to 3 students.

OT 590
Rancho Los
Amigos National
Rehabilitation
Center
(2-4 Units)
Enrollment limited
to 2 students.

OT 590
Rancho Los
Amigos National
Rehabilitation
Center
(2 Units)
Enrollment limited
to 1 student.
Interview
Required.

Description
This course provides opportunities in clinical research and clinical practice. In
the research component of the course, students will become involved in an
Occupational Therapy department-wide outcomes study with the Canadian
Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Students will be involved in
COPM data review, data entry, and data analysis. They will have the opportunity
to reflect on the outcome data and the implications for practice at Rancho. In
addition, students will be invited to discuss research findings through informal
discussions and formal presentations to OT staff. The clinical component of the
course will focus on students observing and interfacing with O.T. staff engaging
in occupation-based practice and impairment-based intervention. A studentcentered approach is utilized in establishing course objectives and an educational
plan for both the research and clinical components of this course. There is
flexibility in scheduling the hours at Rancho according to the best days and times
for students (8 hrs./wk. for 4 units; 4 hrs./wk. for 2 units).
This course provides the opportunity for students to be involved in clinical
research at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center in Downey. The
main focus is to explore the application of occupational science in patient
education in the area of occupational therapy/diabetes self management.
Students will be involved in three
components: (1) individualized clinical observation to understand the OT
process, (2) literature reviews and discussion to establish the link between
knowledge and practice, and (3) patient encounters exploring patients
commitment-to-act in self management. There is flexibility in scheduling the
hours at Rancho according to the best days and times for students (8 ~10
hrs./wk. for 4 units; 4 ~6 hrs./wk. for 2 units).

Day/Time
To be
arranged
with
Instructor.

Location
Rancho Los
Amigos
Rehab.
Center
Downey,
CA

Instructor
Michele
Berro

TBA
To be
arranged
with
Instructor.

Rancho Los
Amigos
Rehab.
Center
Downey,
CA

Shanpin
Fanchiang

Students will be exposed to several of the grants available for persons with
disabilities. The participants will develop skills in simple grant writing for the
purpose of purchasing equipment while furthering their abilities to interview and
develop rapport with clients and staff, assessing the needs of the clients, and
exploring their occupational and psychosocial situation. Goals of the clients will
be explored throughout the process while emphasizing a self management
approach. The participants will develop skills in needs assessment, and gain
knowledge of appropriate equipment and medical necessity as well as funding
sources. Internet as well as other sources will be incorporated in locating and
comparing prices for recommended equipment. Participants will have the
opportunity to attend team communication meetings where they will increase
their knowledge of pressure ulcer management and care/prevention. Participants
will have opportunities to communicate with outside agencies and understand
the follow-up process.

To be
arranged
with
Instructor.

Rancho Los
Amigos
Rehab.
Center
Downey,
CA

Monica
Godinez

27

2009 (2010 Schedule may change) Spring Pathways to Excellence Courses


Course
OT 505
Seminar in
Occupational
Therapy
(2 Units)
OT 564
Sensory
Integration
Theory
(4 Units)

Description
This course stresses application of all course content to specific clinical problems, and
helps synthesize the past 2 years of coursework. The course encourages students to
synthesize theoretical knowledge and practical skills in order to critically investigate
what would be considered best practice for a large selection of diverse case scenarios.
This high level of clinical reasoning skills is crucial for students as they prepare for the
NBCOT exam and for their future careers as occupational therapists.
This course provides a comprehensive overview of sensory integration theory, reviewing
basic intervention principles and integrating them with concepts from Occupational
Science and evidence-based practice. Students gain expertise in interpretation of child
behavior using specialized knowledge regarding sensory processing and praxis. The
course fulfills the Perspective Course requirements (one of the four courses required) for
certification to conduct sensory integration evaluations.

Day/Time
TBA

Location
TBA

Instructor
Brigette
Ingersoll

TBA

G37
HSC

Erna
Blanche

OT 571
Assistive
Technology
(4 Units)

This course explores theoretical and practical principles of assessment, selection, funding
acquisition, training, and follow-up in the use of assistive technologies including powered
mobility, computer access technologies, augmentative and alternative communication,
and environmental control to enable and enhance participation in meaningful occupations
by individuals with a variety of disabilities across the life span.

TBA

HSC

TBA

OT 572
Ergonomics
(4 Units)

Ergonomics will focus on the application of human factors to environmental design in


office and industrial settings. Through an understanding of the person environment
interaction, students will learn how to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders
and recommend appropriate equipment and changes to the workstation. In addition,
students will review current research on the effects of physical design on users' injury
rate, behavior, performance, and stress levels. Consultation strategies and work in
industrial settings will be highlighted.

TBA

VKC
203

Cindy
Burt

OT 574
Enhancing
Motor Control
for Occupation
(4 Units)

This course will provide the student with an in depth understanding of principles and
methods for remediation of motor control following upper motor neuron lesions. Through
journal article review, assigned readings, seminar discussions and laboratory experiences,
students will learn about theories and concepts of motor control, motor learning and their
application to the impairments and disabilities of individuals with upper motor neuron
lesions. This will include review of basic anatomy and biomechanics of the upper
extremity, typical motor control problems of the adult with hemiplegia and their
interference with performance in occupation. With supervision and instructor feedback,
students will practice movement analysis skills and assessment and handling skills, based
upon the Neurodevelopmental Treatment Approach (NDT), and application of NDT to
occupation-based intervention. In addition to formal class meeting, students will attend
and participate in a two-hour, out-patient occupational therapy group (for stroke patients)
weekly at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center. Group participation will
include clinical observation of individuals with upper motor neuron lesions and provision
of treatment. CPR certification and all human resources, health, safety and HIPAA
clearances are required.

TBA

Rancho
Los
Amigos

Remy
Chu

28

OT 575
Dysphagia Across the
Lifespan:
Pediatrics
through
Geriatrics
(2 Units)
OT 583
Lifestyle Redesign
(4 units)
OT 599
Public Speaking for
Occupational
Therapists
(2 units)

OT 599
Developing
Entrepreneurship into a
successful Private
Practice

This course is intended for students who want to gain a better understanding of dysphagia
through the lifespan and how it fits into the OT Standards of Practice. This course will
cover the oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal structures and functions as they relate to
normal and dysfunctional swallowing as well as assessment and treatment strategies for
patients and caregivers by utilizing a combination of didactic, case study, and hands on
techniques. Completion of the course will meet 24 hours of the recommended 45 hours
of continuing education coursework needed for the dysphagia specialized certification
needed for this practice area in California
Students explore the ways in which their own occupations contribute to their health and
well-being and learn how to design Lifestyle Redesign programs for both well individuals
and people with various disabilities. Topics covered include needs assessment,
therapeutic process, and building of modules; marketing, and financial feasibility.
Based on theory and methods derived from the theater, this is an experiential
class designed to (1) develop effectiveness and increase confidence in public
speaking skills, (2) develop increased vocal strength and clarity, and (3)
develop an understanding of the psycho-physiology of the human voice. This
course is not a traditional didactic college class. It is an active learning class,
the core of which is a progression of physical and vocal exercises. These
exercises are simple to learn but require regular practice in order to be
effective. Each series of exercises builds upon the preceding ones. Attendance
therefore is imperative as students will be learning from doing in class.
The main objective is to develop a program or expand an already existing program or
business into a formal business plan with a marketing plan and implementation strategies
to ensure a viable and successful private practice or program. Class room time will be
spent utilizing the worksheets of the required text, online research and development,
brainstorming and role playing through the business plan development through real world
case scenarios and presentation of the students business idea. At the end of the course,
you will be able to use your business plan and your entrepreneurship skills to potentially
seek funding and opportunities to implement your business idea into the market
community. The course will expand upon previous course work and discussions of the
fundamentals of entrepreneurship, leadership, management, practice operations, small
business and health care organizational structures, health care rules and regulations,
marketing, legal and ethics, billing and reimbursement, public policy and advocacy.

29

TBA

CHP
112
HSC

Pam
Roberts

TBA

Center

Camille
Dieterle

TBA

TBA

Peter
Wittrock

Center

Tammy
Richmond

Spring Electives
Clinical Experiences (OT 500 A, B or C)
Course
OT 500
USC University
Hospital
(2 or 4 Units)
Enrollment
limited to 5
students.

OT 500
USC
Occupational
Therapy Faculty
Practice
(2-4 units)
Interview
Required.
Enrollment
limited to 4
students.
OT 500
Optimal Living
with Multiple
Sclerosis
(2-4 Units)
Interview
Required.

Description
Students will be mentored in occupational therapy treatment with patients on the
inpatient psychiatric unit and on the acute medical/surgical floors. The students
experience may include observation of skilled therapists, hands-on treatment of
clients, and searching research literature for evidence to support a clinical course
of action. This is a good opportunity for those students who feel they have had
limited experience in traditional practice settings. The days and times will be
determined by the instructor and student. NOTE: University Hospital has strict
requirements for all people working or taking classes there. EVERYONE
must have a drug screen, a background check and view the Hospitals HIPAA
video prior to beginning. Please be advised that when you sign up for this
class, there are additional costs involved as follows: Background check
through LiveScan is approximately $59. The drug screen is an additional $40
45 or more, depending on the lab used. Please see Robin Turner in the
department for additional information and to schedule a time to view the
HIPAA video.

Day/Time
To be
arranged
with
Instructor.

Location
USC
University
Hospital

Instructor
Don
Gordon

Students may participate in any of the following activities--assist with the USC
Lifestyle Redesign Weight Loss, Supported Education and/or Pain Management
Program; observation and documentation of the Executive Health Consultation;
development of marketing materials and/or marketing activity for any of the above
programs; module and/or content research and development for any of the above
programs; outcomes research for any of the above programs; filing insurance forms
and speaking to insurance representatives for reimbursement for any of the above
programs; support work for any of the above programs or for the general practice
activities. There is flexibility in scheduling hours at the practice according to the
best days and times for students (8 hrs./wk. for 4 units; 4 hrs./wk. for 2 units).

To be
arranged
with
Instructor.

USC OS/OT
Faculty
Practice

Camille
Dieterle

This is a 12 week program in collaboration with the National Multiple Sclerosis


Society and the USC Divisions of Occupational Science and Occupational
Therapy, Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy and the Department of Neurology.
This program helps people with MS who are experiencing physical changes which
are interfering with their daily routine. The OT student works one-on-one with 12 participants in educating them on how to structure a health promoting routine,
increase life satisfaction, and expand functional mobility. The OT student will
also experience running a group module; collaborate with PT students; and, in
general, put knowledge to action in a supported environment. This is a unique and
exciting program for students to gain clinical expertise and experience in a
Lifestyle Redesign intervention. Your instructor will work closely with you to
develop and hone your clinical application and skills and help you transition to the
working world.
NOTE: 2 units; Fridays 9 AM 1 PM.
4 units; Fridays 9 AM 1 PM, PLUS 4 hours M, T, W, or Th.

See note.

USC OS/OT
Faculty
Practice
&
CHP-139

Karen
McNulty

30

Spring Electives
Directed Research (OT 590)
Course
OT 590
Cedars Sinai
Medical Center.
Evidence-Based
Occupational
Therapy Practice
(2-4 units)
Enrollment limited
to 2 students
OT 590
Rancho Los Amigos
National
Rehabilitation
Center
(2-4 Units)
Enrollment limited
to 3 students.

OT 590
Rancho Los Amigos
National
Rehabilitation
Center
(2-4 Units)
Enrollment limited
to 2 students.
OT 590
Rancho Los Amigos
National
Rehabilitation
Center
(2 Units)
Enrollment limited
to 1 student.
Interview Required.

Description
This project involves observation of Occupational Therapy treatment sessions
in an acute medical, in-patient and/or out-patient rehabilitation setting for 4-6
hours. The focus of the project is research on specific treatment strategies that
are currently being used in practice. Current literature will be analyzed to
assist with dictating best practice, resulting in a portfolio of evidencebriefs supporting or refuting such treatment strategies, and culminating in a
formal presentation to clinicians at the medical center. This project will
provide students with increased exposure to the therapy process and concretely
provide a link between research and practice. Skills such as research analysis
and ability to present to staff will be developed. Students will prepare an
Evidence Brief Paper(s) and present to staff.
This course provides opportunities in clinical research and clinical practice. In
the research component of the course, students will become involved in an
Occupational Therapy department-wide outcomes study with the Canadian
Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Students will be involved in
COPM data review, data entry, and data analysis. They will have the
opportunity to reflect on the outcome data and the implications for practice at
Rancho. In addition, students will be invited to discuss research findings
through informal discussions and formal presentations to OT staff. The
clinical component of the course will focus on students observing and
interfacing with O.T. staff engaging in occupation-based practice and
impairment-based intervention. A student-centered approach is utilized in
establishing course objectives and an educational plan for both the research
and clinical components of this course. There is flexibility in scheduling the
hours at Rancho according to the best days and times for students (8 hrs./wk.
for 4 units; 4 hrs./wk. for 2 units).

Day/Time
To be
arranged with
Instructor.

To be
arranged with
Instructor.

Rancho Los
Amigos
Rehab.
Center
Downey,
CA

Michele
Berro

This course provides the opportunity for students to be involved in clinical


research at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center in Downey.
The main focus is to explore occupational therapy and diabetes self
management. Students will be involved in three components: (1)
individualized clinical observation to understand the OT process, (2) literature
reviews and discussion to establish the link between knowledge and practice,
and (3) clinical research related to diabetes self management. There is
flexibility in scheduling the hours at Rancho according to the best days and
times for students (8 ~10 hrs./wk. for 4 units; 4 ~6 hrs./wk. for 2 units).

TBA
To be
arranged with
Instructor.

Rancho Los
Amigos
Rehab.
Center
Downey,
CA

Shanpin
Fanchiang

Students will be exposed to several of the grants available for persons with
disabilities. The participants will develop skills in simple grant writing for
the purpose of purchasing equipment while furthering their abilities to
interview and develop rapport with clients and staff, assessing the needs of the
clients, and exploring their occupational and psychosocial situation. Goals of
the clients will be explored throughout the process while emphasizing a self
management approach. The participants will develop skills in needs
assessment, and gain knowledge of appropriate equipment and medical
necessity as well as funding sources. Internet as well as other sources will be
incorporated in locating and comparing prices for recommended equipment.
Participants will have the opportunity to attend team communication meetings
where they will increase their knowledge of pressure ulcer management and
care/prevention. Participants will have opportunities to communicate with
outside agencies and understand the follow-up process.

To be
arranged with
Instructor.

Rancho Los
Amigos
Rehab.
Center
Downey,
CA

Monica
Godinez

31

Location
CedarsSinai Med.
Ctr.
Los
Angeles

Instructor
Pam
Roberts
Maria
Cecilia
Alpasan

Figure 4. Division Program Composite / Sequences and Timelines


BS, BA or
MA

PhD in Occupational Sciences


500 Level Courses

Screening after 2
semesters

600 Level Courses

Qualifying Exam:
paper for
publication and
proposal for
dissertation

5 years clinical
experience or 8
additional units

OS Core: 4 units
Cognate: 4 units
Residency: 6 units

OS Core: 4 units
Cognate: 4 units
Residency: 6 units

Full Time
Residency
12 units

Thesis

Thesis

3 months of
fieldwork level II

NBCOT (OTR)
exam eligible

3 months of
fieldwork level II

NBCOT (OTR)
exam eligible

Dissertation

OTR or
NBCOT
Eligible

OTD in Occupational Therapy


500 Level Courses

BS or BS in
OT

MA in Occupational Therapy (MA1)


500 Level Core
Courses: 20 units
and 1 400/500
level elective: 4
units

8 units and comp


exam

BA or BS

MA in Occupational Therapy (MA2)


OT Pre-reqs
200 400 Level

BS to MA in Occupational Therapy
100 300 level
College of Letters,
OT pre-reqs
Arts and Sciences
200 400 Level
pre-reqs

3 semesters of 400
Level OT courses

3 months of
fieldwork level II

3 semesters of 400
Level OT courses

3 months of
fieldwork level II

2 semesters of 500
level courses (20
units) and 1
elective (4 units)

Thesis

2 semesters of 500
level courses (20
units) and 1
elective (4 units)

Thesis

2 semesters of 500
level courses (20
units) and 1
elective (4 units)
Completed May
2010

Thesis
Varies

3 months of
fieldwork level II

NBCOT (OTR)
exam eligible

2 electives (8
units) and comp
exam
May 2010

Completed
Summer 2010

Any time after


Sept. 15, 2010

8 units and comp


exam

8 units and comp


exam

Projected NBCOT Eligibility Dates for MA2 Class Entering 2009


BA or BS

MA in Occupational Therapy (MA2)

OT Pre-reqs
200 400 Level

3 semesters of 400
Level OT courses
Completed May
2009

3 months of
fieldwork level II
Completed
Summer 2009

32

2009-2010
Fall Semester 2009 (72 instructional days)
Open Registration
Move-In
Classes Begin
Labor Day
Thanksgiving
Classes End
Study Days
Exams
Winter Recess

M-F
W
M
M
Th-Sa
F
Sa-Tu
W-W
Th-Su

August 17-21
August 19
August 24
September 7
November 26-28
December 4
December 5-8
December 9-16 (6 days)
December 17-January 10 (25 days)

Spring Semester 2010 (73 instructional days)


Open Registration
Classes Begin
Martin Luther King's Birthday
Presidents' Day
Spring Recess
Classes End
Study Days
Exams
Commencement

Th-F
M
M
M
M-Sa
F
Sa-Tu
W-W
F

January 7-8
January 11
January 18
February 15
March 15-20
April 30
May 1-4
May 5-12 (6 days)
May 14

Summer Semester 2010 (58 instructional days)


Registration
Classes Begin
Memorial Day
Independence Day
Classes End

M-Tu
W
M
M
Tu

May 17-18
May 19
May 31
July 5
August 10

33

General Schedule
Summer 2009
OT 440 Foundations of Occupation-Kinesiology (Samia Rafeedie, MA, OTR/L)
OT 441 Foundations of Occupation-Neuroscience (Leah Stein, MA, OTR/L)
OT 405 Skills-Theory I (Linda Fazio, Ph.D., OTR/L, FAOTA)

June 2009
Sunday
Sunday

7
14

5
21

12
28

Monday

Monday

26

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

3Wednesday 4 Thursday

10
1

11
2

12
3

17

18

19

OT 440
Kinesiology
8:30 - 12:30
CHP Auditorium
OT 440
Kinesiology
8:30 - 12:30
CHP405
Auditorium
OT
Skills
1:30 - 4:30
______________
CHP
111 / 112

OT 440
Kinesiology
8:30 - 12:30
CHP Auditorium
OT 440
Kinesiology
8:30 - 12:30
CHP Auditorium

Friday

Saturday

Friday

6 Saturday

a.
Holid
ay

15

16

General
Orientation
8:30 12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 440
Kinesiology
8:30 - 12:30
CHP Auditorium

______________

______________

1:30
Orientation
Continues.
OT 440
Kinesiology
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

22

1:30
Orientation
Continues.
OT 440
Kinesiology
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

23

1:30
Orientation
Continues.
OT 440
Kinesiology
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

24

1:30
Orientation
Continues
OT 440
Kinesiology
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 440
Kinesiology
OT-405
Skills
8:30 - 12:30
1:30-4:30
CHP
CHP Auditorium
111/112

OT 440
OT-405
Skills
Kinesiology
1:30-4:30
8:30 - 12:30
CHP Auditorium
111/112

OT440
OT-405
Skills
Kinesiology
1:30-4:30
8:30 - 12:30
CHP
111/112
CHP Auditorium

13

14

15

16

17

OT 405 Skills
OT
1:30441
- 4:30
Neuroscience
CHP 111 / 112
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 405 Skills
OT
1:30441
- 4:30
Neuroscience
CHP 111 / 112
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 405 Skills
OT
1:30441
- 4:30
Neuroscience
CHP 111 / 112
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 405 Skills
OT 441
1:30
- 4:30
Neuroscience
CHP
111 / 112
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 441
Neuroscience
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT-405
OT 440 Skills
1:30-4:30
Kinesiology
CHP
8:30 -111/112
12:30

OT-405
OT 440 Skills
1:30-4:30
Kinesiology
CHP
8:30 -111/112
12:30

OT-405 Skills
1:30-4:30
CHP 111/112

OT-405 Skills
1:30-4:30
CHP 111/112

20

21

22

23

24

OT
OT 405
441 Skills
1:30 - 4:30
Neuroscience
CHP 111 / 112
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT
OT 405
441 Skills
1:30 - 4:30
Neuroscience
CHP 111 / 112
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 441
Neuroscience
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 441
Neuroscience
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 441
Neuroscience
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT-405 Skills
1:30-4:30
CHP 111/112

OT-405 Skills
1:30-4:30
CHP 111/112

OT-405 Skills
1:30-4:30
CHP 111/112

OT-405 Skills
1:30-4:30
CHP 111/112

27

28

29

30

31

OT441
Neuroscience
8:30 - 12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 441
Neuroscience
8:30 - 12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 441
Neuroscience
8:30 - 12:30
34
CHP Auditorium

OT 441
Neuroscience
8:30 - 12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 441
Neuroscience
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT-405 Skills
1:30-4:30
CHP 111/112

OT-405 Skills
1:30-4:30
CHP 111/112

OT-405 Skills
1:30-4:30
CHP 111/112

OT-405 Skills
1:30-4:30
CHP 111/112

29

CHP Auditorium

19

Tuesday

30

413
20

OT 440
Kinesiology
8:30 - 12:30
CHP Auditorium

______________

10

11

25

OT 440
Kinesiology
FINAL EXAM
CHP Auditorium

26

27

OT 440
Kinesiology
8:30 12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 440 Kinesiology
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

18

CHP Auditorium

25

July 2009
August 2009
Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

OT 441
Neuroscience
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 441
Neuroscience
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 441
Neuroscience
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 441
Neuroscience
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

O(T 441
Neuroscience
Final Exam
8:30-12:30
CHP Auditorium

1:30 4:30
Fieldwork
Orientation

1:30 4:30
Fieldwork
Orientation

1:30 4:30
Fieldwork
Orientation

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

26

27

28

29

30

Fall
Classes
Begin
WHEN REGISTERING FOR PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM (400 COURSES) FALL AND SPRING SEMESTERS YOU
WILL BE ADVISED WHICH SECTION TO REGISTER FOR A, B, OR C. YOU THEN MUST REGISTER FOR ALL
COURSES IN THAT SECTION.
If you have any problems with registration contact:
Laura Sturza in the OS/OT Division office at: (323) 442-1865, or email at: sturza@usc.edu.

35

Professional Program (1st Year) Composite / Fall 2009


NOTE: Each section has one full-day fieldwork on either T, W or Th from 9/21 10/30/09, and one full week of
fieldwork from 11/9 11/13/09.
Monday
8:30

OT 463 Skills II (A)


Fazio
10:00 12:00
CHP-112

Tuesday

Wednesday

OT 420 Development (C)


TBA
8:30 12:00
CHP 113

OT 420 Development (A) TBA


8:30 12:00
CHP 113

OT 452 Phys Dys Labs (A)


Rafeedie/Vartanian
(concurrent)
9:00 12:00
CHP 139 & 111

OT 452 Phys Dys Labs (B)


Rafeedie/Vartanian
(concurrent)
9:00 12:00
CHP 139 & 111

OT 405 Skills I (Jrs.)


Fazio
8:30 12:00
CHP 112 and Center

OT 560 School-Based Grant


Bissell
9:00 11:50
CHP 112

Thursday
OT 453 Psychosocial (C)
Pitts
8:30 12:00
CHP 113

OT 440 Kinesiology (Jrs)


McLaughlin Gray
8:30 12:00
CHP 139
OT 463 Skills II (B)
Fazio
10:00 12:00
CHP 112

1:00

OT 463 Skills II (C)


Fazio
1:00 3:00
CHP 112

OT 261 Physiology
Howell
1:00 3:50
CHP 111

OT 452 Phys Dys Labs (C)


Rafeedie/Vartanian
(concurrent)
1:00 4:00
CHP 139 & 111

OT 420 Development (B)


TBA
1:00 4:30
CHP-113

OT 453 Psychosocial (A)


Pitts
1:00 - 4:30
CHP 113

5:30
OT 452 Lecture (A, B, C)
Rafeedie
3:30 5:30
CHP Auditorium

OT 260 Anatomy
Pollard
1:00 4:50
CHP 112

OT 560 School-Based Practice


Kellegrew
1:00 3:50
CHP 111

36

OT 453 Psychosocial (B)


Pitts
1:00 4:30
CHP 113

Friday
O.T. 415 Med. Lect. (A,
B, C)
Kitching
8:30 Noon
CHP Auditorium

SECTION A
Monday
8:30

OT 463 Skills II
Fazio
10:00 12:00
CHP-112

Tuesday
OT 452 Phys Dys Labs
Rafeedie/Vartanian
(concurrent)
9:00 12:00
CHP 139 & 111

Wednesday

Thursday

O.T. 415 Med. Lect.


Kitching
8:30 12:00
CHP Auditorium

OT 420 Development
TBA
8:30 12:00
CHP 113

Level I Fieldwork:
Off-site
Clinical Experience

12:00
1:00
OT 453 Psychosocial
Pitts
1:00 4:30
CHP 113

OT 452 Lecture
Rafeedie
3:30 5:30
CHP Auditorium
5:30

37

Friday

SECTION B
Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

8:30
OT 466 Phys Dys Labs
Refeedie/Vartanian
(concurrent)
9:00 12:00
CHP 139 & 111

12:00

Level I Fieldwork:
Off-site
Clinical Experience

1:00

OT 420 Development
TBA
1:00 4:30
CHP 113

OT 452 Lecture
Rafeedie
3:30 5:30
CHP Auditorium
5:30

38

Friday
O.T. 415 Med. Lect.
Kitching
8:30 12:00
CHP Auditorium

OT 463 Skills II
Fazio
10:00 12:00
CHP 112

OT 453 Psychosocial
Pitts
1:00 - 4:30
CHP 113

SECTION C
Monday
8:30

Tuesday

Wednesday

OT 420 Development
TBA
8:30 12:00
CHP 113

12:00
1:00
OT 463 Skills II
Fazio
1:00 3:00
CHP-112

OT 452 Phys Dys Labs


Rafeedie/Vartanian
(concurrent)
1:00 4:00
CHP 139 & 111

Thursday
OT 453 Psychosocial
Pitts
8:30 12:00
CHP 113

Level I Fieldwork:
Off-site
Clinical Experience

OT 452 Lecture
Rafeedie
3:30 5:30
CHP Auditorium
5:30

39

Friday
O.T. 415 Med. Lect.
Kitching
8:30 12:00
CHP Auditorium

Professional Program
Semester: Spring 2010
8:30

1:00

Monday
OT 464 Skills Theory III
Lecture
Pitts
9:00 12:00
Sections A, B, C
CHP Auditorium

OT 485 OS/OT
Lecture
Daley
1:00 3:00
Sections A, B, C
CHP Auditorium

Level I Fidwork: March 1 March 12


Spring Break: March 15 19
Tuesday
OT 466 Phys Dys Lect (A)
McLaughlin Gray
9:00 12:00 CHP 111
OT 468 Gerontology (B)
Rafeedie
9:00 12:00 CHP 112

Wednesday
OT 467 Pediatrics (B)
Surfas
9:00 12:00 CHP 113
OT 464 Skills Lab (C)
Fazio
10:00 12:00 CHP 112

Thursday
OT 466 Phys Dys Lect (C)
McLaughlin Gray
9:00 12:00 CHP 111
OT 465 Psychosocial (A)
Pitts
1:00 4:00 CHP 113

OT 467 Pediatrics (C)


Bodison
9:00 12:00 CHP 113

OT 466 Phys Dis Lab (A)


Vartanian
8:00 10:00 OR 10:00 12:00
CHP 139

OT 464 Skills Lab (B)


Fazio
10:00 12:00 CHP 112

OT 441 Neuroscience (Jrs)


Aziz-Zedeh
8:30 12:00 Center

TOTS Grant
Kellegrew
9:00 12:00 CHP 111

OT 420 Development (Jrs)


Crowley
8:30 12:00 CHP 139

OT 465 Psychosocial (C)


Pitts
1:00 4:00 CHP 113

OT 465 Psychosocial (B)


Pitts
1:00 4:00 CHP 113

OT 466 Phys Dys Lect (B)


McLaughlin Gray
1:00 4:00 CHP 111

OT 466 Phys Dys Lab (B)


Vartanian
1:00 3:00 OR 3:00 5:00
CHP 139
OT 468 Gerontology (C)
Rafeedie
1:00 4:00 CHP 111

OT 468 Gerontology (A)


Rafeedie
1:00 4:00 CHP 112

OT 464 Skills Lab (A)


Fazio
1:00 3:00 CHP 112

OT 466 Phys Dys Lab (C)


Vartanian
1:00 3:00 OR 3:00 5:00
CHP 139

OT 260 Anatomy
Pollard
1:00 4:50 CHP 113

OT 261 Physiology
Howell
1:00 3:50 CHP 111

Professional Program

OT 467 Pediatrics (A)


Surfas
9:00 12:00 CHP 112

Level I Fieldwork: March 1 March 12

40

Friday

Semester: Spring 2010

Spring Break: March 15 19

Section A
Monday
9:00

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

OT 464 Skills Theory III


Lecture
Pitts
9:00 12:00
Sections A, B, C
CHP Auditorium

OT 466 Phys Dys


Lecture
McLaughlin Gray
9:00 12:00
CHP 111

OT 466 Phys Dys Lab


Vartanian
8:00 10:00
or
10:00 12:00
CHP 139

OT 465 Psychosocial
Pitts
9:00 12:00
CHP 113

OT 485 OS/OT
Lecture
Daley
1:00 3:00
Sections A, B, C
CHP Auditorium

OT 468 Gerontology
Rafeedie
1:00 4:00
CHP 112

OT 464 Skills Lab


Fazio
1:00 3:00
CHP 112

OT 467 Pediatrics
Bodison
1:00 4:00
CHP 112

12:00
1:00

5:00

41

Friday

Professional Program
Semester: Spring 2010

Level I Fieldwork: March 1 March 12


Spring Break: March 15 19

Section B
Monday
9:00

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

OT 464 Skills Theory III


Lecture
Pitts
9:00 12:00
Sections A, B, C
CHP Auditorium

OT 468 Gerontology
Rafeedie
9:00 12:00
CHP 112

OT 467 Pediatrics
Surfas
9:00 12:00
CHP 113

OT 464 Skills Lab Fazio


10:00 12:00
CHP 112

OT 485 OS/OT
Lecture
Daley
1:00 3:00
Sections A, B, C
CHP Auditorium

OT 466 Phys Dys


Lecture
McLaughlin Gray
1:00 - 4:00
CHP 111

OT 466 Phys Dys Lab


Vartanian
1:00 3:00
or
3:00 5:00
CHP 139

OT 465 Psychosocial
Pitts
1:00 4:00
CHP 113

12:00
1:00

5:00

42

Friday

Professional Program
Semester: Spring 2010

Level I Fieldwork: March 1 March 12


Spring Break: March 15 19

Section C
Monday
9:00

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

OT 464 Skills Theory III


Lecture
Pitts
9:00 12:00
Sections A, B, C
CHP Auditorium

OT 467 Pediatrics
Bodison
9:00 12:00
CHP 113

464 Skills Lab


Fazio
10:00 12:00
CHP 112

OT 466 Phys Dis Lect


McLaughlin Gray
9:00 12:00
CHP 111

OT 485 OS/OT
Lecture
Daley
1:00 3:00
Sections A, B, C
CHP Auditorium

OT 465 Psychosocial
Pitts
1:00 4:00
CHP 113

OT 468 Gerontology
Rafeedie
1:00 4:00
CHP 111

OT 466 Phys Dys Lab


Vartanian
1:00 3:00
or
3:00 5:00
CHP 139

12:00
1:00

5:00

43

Friday

Health Sciences Campus - Driving Directions & Map


Located just three miles from downtown Los Angeles and seven miles from the USC University Park Campus
(UPC), the USC Health Science Campus (HSC) is a focal point for students, patients, and scientists from around
the world
For a map of HSC and driving directions, go to www.usc.edu/about/visit/hsc/

University Park Campus - Driving Directions & Map


Located next to one of the city's major cultural centers, Exposition Park, the 155-acre University Park Campus
(UPC) is just minutes from downtown Los Angeles and is easily accessible by major freeways.
For a map of UPC and driving directions go to www.usc.edu/about/visit/upc/driving_directions/
University Park Campus - Public Parking
For a map of parking structures at UPC, go to http://www.usc.edu/about/visit/upc/public_parking/
On Campus
Parking on campus is currently $7. A small amount of one-hour metered parking is also available.
Off Campus
Four-hour and two-hour metered parking is available on Figueroa Street and Jefferson Boulevard.
For Public Transportation to UPC and between UPC and HSC see
http://www.usc.edu/about/visit/upc/public_transportation/
USC Tram Service
Please check http://transnet.usc.edu for complete schedules and latest updates.

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY CODE OF ETHICS (2005)


PREAMBLE

44

The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics (2005) is a public statement of
principles used to promote and maintain high standards of conduct within the profession and is supported by the Core Values and
Attitudes of Occupational Therapy Practice (AOTA, 1993). Members of AOTA are committed to promoting inclusion, diversity,
independence, and safety for all recipients in various stages of life, health, and illness and to empower all beneficiaries of occupational
therapy. This commitment extends beyond service recipients to include professional colleagues, students, educators, businesses, and
the community.
Fundamental to the mission of the occupational therapy profession is the therapeutic use of everyday life activities (occupations) with
individuals or groups for the purpose of participation in roles and situations in home, school, workplace, community, and other
settings. Occupational therapy addresses the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory and other aspects of performance in a variety
of contexts to support engagement in everyday life activities that affect health, well being and quality of life (Definition of
Occupational Therapy Practice for the AOTA Model Practice Act, 2004). Occupational therapy personnel have an ethical
responsibility first and foremost to recipients of service as well as to society.
The historical foundation of this Code is based on ethical reasoning surrounding practice and professional issues, as well as empathic
reflection regarding these interactions with others. This reflection resulted in the establishment of principles that guide ethical action.
Ethical action goes beyond rote following of rules or application of principles; rather it is a manifestation of moral character and
mindful reflection. It is a commitment to beneficence for the sake of others, to virtuous practice of artistry and science, to genuinely
good behaviors, and to noble acts of courage. It is an empathic way of being among others, which is made every day by all
occupational therapy personnel.
The AOTA Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics (2005) is an aspirational guide to professional conduct when ethical issues surface.
Ethical decision making is a process that includes awareness regarding how the outcome will impact occupational therapy clients in all
spheres. Applications of Code principles are considered situation-specific and where a conflict exists, occupational therapy personnel
will pursue responsible efforts for resolution.
The specific purpose of the AOTA Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics (2005) is to:
1. Identify and describe the principles supported by the occupational therapy profession
2. Educate the general public and members regarding established principles to which occupational therapy personnel are
accountable
3. Socialize occupational therapy personnel new to the practice to expected standards of conduct
4. Assist occupational therapy personnel in recognition and resolution of ethical dilemmas
The AOTA Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics (2005) defines the set principles that apply to occupational therapy personnel at all
levels:
Principle 1. Occupational therapy personnel shall demonstrate a concern for the safety and well-being of the recipients of their
services. (BENEFICENCE)
Occupational therapy personnel shall:
A. Provide services in a fair and equitable manner. They shall recognize and appreciate the cultural components of economics,
geography, race, ethnicity, religious and political factors, marital status, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, and
disability of all recipients of their services.
B. Strive to ensure that fees are fair and reasonable and commensurate with services performed. When occupational therapy
practitioners set fees, they shall set fees considering institutional, local, state, and federal requirements, and with due
regard for the service recipients ability to pay.
C. Make every effort to advocate for recipients to obtain needed services through available means.
D. Recognize the responsibility to promote public health and the safety and well-being of individuals, groups, and/or
communities.
Principle 2. Occupational therapy personnel shall take measures to ensure a recipients safety and avoid imposing or inflicting
harm. (NONMALEFICENCE)
Occupational therapy personnel shall:
A. Maintain therapeutic relationships that shall not exploit the recipient of services sexually, physically, emotionally,
psychologically, financially, socially, or in any other manner.

45

B. Avoid relationships or activities that conflict or interfere with therapeutic professional judgment and objectivity.
C. Refrain from any undue influences that may compromise provision of service. 3
D. Exercise professional judgment and critically analyze directives that could result in potential harm before implementation.
E. Identify and address personal problems that may adversely impact professional judgment and duties.
F. Bring concerns regarding impairment of professional skills of a colleague to the attention of the appropriate authority when
or/if attempts to address concerns are unsuccessful.
Principle 3. Occupational therapy personnel shall respect recipients to assure their rights. (AUTONOMY,
CONFIDENTIALITY)
Occupational therapy personnel shall:
A. Collaborate with recipients, and if they desire, families, significant others, and/or caregivers in setting goals and priorities
throughout the intervention process, including full disclosure of the nature, risk, and potential outcomes of any
interventions.
B. Obtain informed consent from participants involved in research activities and ensure that they understand potential risks
and outcomes.
C. Respect the individuals right to refuse professional services or involvement in research or educational activities.
D. Protect all privileged confidential forms of written, verbal, and electronic communication gained from educational,
practice, research, and investigational activities unless otherwise mandated by local, state, or federal regulations.
Principle 4. Occupational therapy personnel shall achieve and continually maintain high standards of competence. (DUTY).
Occupational therapy personnel shall:
A. Hold the appropriate national, state, or any other requisite credentials for the services they provide.
B. Conform to AOTA standards of practice, and official documents.
C. Take responsibility for maintaining and documenting competence in practice, education, and research by participating in
professional development and educational activities.
D. Be competent in all topic areas in which they provide instruction to consumers, peers, and/or students.
E. Critically examine available evidence so they may perform their duties on the basis of current information.
F. Protect service recipients by ensuring that duties assumed by or assigned to other occupational therapy personnel match
credentials, qualifications, experience, and scope of practice.
G. Provide appropriate supervision to individuals for whom they have supervisory responsibility in accordance with
Association official documents, local, state, and federal or national laws and regulations, and institutional policies and
procedures.
H. Refer to or consult with other service providers whenever such a referral or consultation would be helpful to the care of the
recipient of service. The referral or consultation process shall be done in collaboration with the recipient of service.
Principle 5. Occupational therapy personnel shall comply with laws and Association policies guiding the profession of
occupational therapy. (PROCEDURAL JUSTICE)
Occupational therapy personnel shall:
A. Familiarize themselves with and seek to understand and abide by institutional rules, applicable Association policies; local,
state, and federal/national/international laws.
B. Be familiar with revisions in those laws and Association policies that apply to the profession of occupational therapy and
shall inform employers, employees, and colleagues of those changes.
C. Encourage those they supervise in occupational therapy-related activities to adhere to the Code.
D. Take reasonable steps to ensure employers are aware of occupational therapys ethical obligations, as set forth in this Code,
and of the implications of those obligations for occupational therapy practice, education, and research.
E. Record and report in an accurate and timely manner all information related to professional activities.
Principle 6. Occupational therapy personnel shall provide accurate information when representing the profession.
(VERACITY)
Occupational therapy personnel shall:
A. Represent their credentials, qualifications, education, experience, training, and competence accurately. This is of particular
importance for those to whom occupational therapy personnel provide their services or with whom occupational therapy
personnel have a professional relationship.
B. Disclose any professional, personal, financial, business, or volunteer affiliations that may pose a conflict of interest to those

46

with whom they may establish a professional, contractual, or other working relationship.
C. Refrain from using or participating in the use of any form of communication that contains false, fraudulent, deceptive, or
unfair statements or claims.
D. Identify and fully disclose to all appropriate persons errors that compromise recipients safety.
E. Accept responsibility for their professional actions that reduce the publics trust in occupational therapy services and those
that perform those services.
Principle 7. Occupational therapy personnel shall treat colleagues and other professionals with respect, fairness, discretion, and
integrity. (FIDELITY)
Occupational therapy personnel shall:
A. Preserve, respect, and safeguard confidential information about colleagues and staff, unless otherwise mandated by
national, state, or local laws.
B. Accurately represent the qualifications, views, contributions, and findings of colleagues.
C. Take adequate measures to discourage, prevent, expose, and correct any breaches of the Code and report any breaches of
the Code to the appropriate authority.
D. Avoid conflicts of interest and conflicts of commitment in employment and volunteer roles.
E. Use conflict resolution and/or alternative dispute resolution resources to resolve organizational and interpersonal conflicts.
F. Familiarize themselves with established policies and procedures for handling concerns about this Code, including
familiarity with national, state, local, district, and territorial procedures for handling ethics complaints. These include
policies and procedures created by AOTA, licensing and regulatory bodies, employers, agencies, certification boards, and
other organizations having jurisdiction over occupational therapy practice.
Note. This AOTA Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics is one of three documents that constitute the Ethics Standards. The other two are the Core Values and Attitudes of
Occupational Therapy Practice (1993) and the Guidelines to the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics (2000).

Glossary
AutonomyThe right of an individual to self-determination. The ability to independently act on ones decisions for their own wellbeing (Beauchamp & Childress, 2001)
BeneficenceDoing good for others or bringing about good for them. The duty to confer benefits to others
ConfidentialityNot disclosing data or information that should be kept private to prevent harm and to abide by policies, regulations,
and laws
DilemmaA situation in which one moral conviction or right action conflicts with another. It exists because there is no one, clear-cut,
right answer
DutyActions required of professionals by society or actions that are self-imposed
EthicsA systematic study of morality (i.e., rules of conduct that are grounded in philosophical principles and theory)
FidelityFaithfully fulfilling vows and promises, agreements, and discharging fiduciary responsibilities (Beauchamp & Childress,
2001)
JusticeThree types of justice are
CompensatoryMaking reparation for wrongs that have been done
Distributive justiceThe act of distributing goods and burdens among members of
society
Procedural justiceAssuring that processes are organized in a fair manner and
policies or laws are followed
MoralityPersonal beliefs regarding values, rules, and principles of what is right or wrong. Morality may be culture-based or culturedriven
NonmaleficenceNot harming or causing harm to be done to oneself or others the duty to ensure that no harm is done
VeracityA duty to tell the truth; avoid deception 7
References
American Occupational Therapy Association. (1993). Core values and attitudes of occupational therapy practice. American Journal of
Occupational Therapy, 47, 10851086.
American Occupational Therapy Association. (1998). Guidelines to the occupational therapy code of ethics. American Journal of
Occupational Therapy, 52, 881884.
American Occupational Therapy Association. (2004). Association policies. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 58, 694695.
Beauchamp, T. L., & Childress, J. F. (2001). Principles of biomedical ethics (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.
Definition of Occupational Therapy Practice for the AOTA Model Practice Act (2004). Retrieved April 9, 2005, from
http://www.aota.org/members/area4/docs/defotpractice.pdf

47

Authors
The Commission on Standards and Ethics (SEC):
Chairperson Melba Arnold, MS, OTR/L S., Maggie Reitz, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Linda Gabriel Franck, PhD, OTR/L,
Darryl J. Austin, MS, OT/L, Diane Hill, COTA/L, AP, ROH, Lorie J. McQuade, MEd, CRC, Daryl K. Knox, MD, Deborah Yarett
Slater, MS, OT/L, FAOTA, Staff Liaison
With contributions to the Preamble by Suzanne Peloquin, PhD, OTR, FAOTA
Adopted by the Representative Assembly 2005C202
Note. This document replaces the 2000 document, Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics (2000) (American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 54, 614616).
Prepared 4/7/2000, revised draftJanuary 2005, second revision 4/2005 by SEC. 8
American Occupational Therapy Association. (2005). Occupational therapy code of ethics (2005). American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 59, 639642
Copyright 2005 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. Permission to reprint for nonprofit, educational use only.

48

49

Appendix A:
Academic Dishonesty Sanction Guidelines*
Violation

Recommended Sanction for


Undergraduates*

Copying answers from other students on exam. F for course.


One person allowing another to cheat from
his/her exam or assignment.

F for course for both persons.

Possessing or using material during exam (crib F for course.


sheets, notes, books, etc.) which is not
expressly permitted by the instructor.
Continuing to write after exam has ended.

F for course.

Taking exam from room and later claiming that F for course and recommendation for further
the instructor lost it.
disciplinary action (possible suspension).
Changing answers after exam has been
returned.

F for course and recommendation for further


disciplinary action (possible suspension).

Fraudulent possession of exam prior to


administration.

F for course and recommendation for


suspension.

Obtaining a copy of an exam or answer key


prior to administration.

Suspension or expulsion from the university; F


for course.

Having someone else take an exam for oneself. Suspension or expulsion from the university for
both students; F for course.
Plagiarism.

F for course.

Submission of purchased term papers or papers F for course and recommendation for further
done by others.
disciplinary action (possible suspension).
Submission of the same term papers to more
F for both courses.
than one instructor, where no previous approval
has been given.
Unauthorized collaboration on an assignment.

F for the course for both students.

Falsification of information in admission


applications (including supporting
documentation).

Revocation of university admission without


opportunity to reapply.

Documentary falsification (e.g., petitions and Suspension or expulsion from the university; F
supporting materials; medical documentation). for course when related to a specific course.
Plagiarism in a graduate thesis or dissertation. Expulsion from the university when discovered
prior to graduation; revocation of degree when
discovered subsequent to graduation.
*Assuming first offense
Please refer to SCampus (p.132) for more information on assessing sanctions. You may also consult with members of the Office of Student Judicial
Affairs and Community Standards at any point in the process by phone at (213) 821-7373 or on the web at: http://www.usc.edu/studentaffairs/SJACS/

*Note: The Student Conduct Code provides that graduate students who are found responsible for academic integrity
violations may be sanctioned more severely than Appendix A suggests.

50

Appendix B:
Report of Academic Integrity Violation
(See Student Conduct Code SCampus, page 130, Section 14.00 for details)
When an instructor has reason to believe that a student has violated the universitys academic integrity standards, he or she should make reasonable
attempts to meet with the student and discuss the alleged violation prior to filing a formal report. When such attempts are unsuccessful within a
reasonable amount of time (preferably within 15 days of identifying the violation), a completed report should be forwarded to the Office of Student
Judicial Affairs and Community Standards with the understanding that the student may subsequently wish to meet with the instructor.
Procedures to be followed when meeting with a student are outlined in SCampus ( p. 133). Members of the Office of Student Judicial Affairs and
Community Standards are also available for consultation at (213) 821-7373.

Student:
Student Identification Number:
Class:
Course number:
Class number:
Semester:
Instructor:
Division/School:
Phone:
Building/Room and Mail Code:
Date of Incident:
a.

Description of Incident:

(Attach additional pages or a supplementary report as necessary;


please include original or facsimile copies of supporting documents):

51

b.

Grade Sanction

An academic penalty or penalties should be assessed by the instructor when he or she has determined an act of academic dishonesty has occurred.
Further disciplinary sanctions may be recommended by the instructor. (For sanction guidelines, see Appendix A to the Student Conduct Code. The
universitys recommended grade penalty for academic dishonesty is F for the course.)
Grade of F for the course
Grade of O for the assignment, examination, paper or project
Final course grade reduced to: ______
Grade for the assignment, examination, paper or project reduced to: ______
Other (please specify):
If the violation is discovered during the final exam period, the instructor should assign a mark of MG until he/she has had the opportunity to meet
with the student. Likewise, if the instructors grade sanction is a grade of F for the course, a mark of MG should be assigned if the student does
not admit responsibility for the violation and accept the grade sanction.
I have provided the student with a copy of this form.

Instructors signature:
Date:

c.

For the Student

I have spoken with my instructor about this matter. I understand that I may not withdraw from this course with a mark of W and that this report will
be forwarded to the Office of Student Judicial Affairs and Community Standards.

Students signature:
Date:
Local address:
Zip code:
Comments (optional):
The instructor should forward this report and supporting documentation to the Office of Student Judicial Affairs and Community Standards, Figueroa
Building, Room 107, MC 1265, telephone (213) 821-7373 or by facsimile to (213) 740-7162.

52

Appendix C:
How To Avoid Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the unethical use of someone elses words or ideas. As part of its commitment to academic integrity, USC has published
its own guidelines (www.usc.edu/student-affairs/SJACS/docs/tig.pdf ) for students to respect and acknowledge the authorship of others.
Clearly and simply explained with excellent examples.
Here is further information:

GUIDE TO AVOIDING PLAGIARISM


Introduction
The following information, with minor modifications, is excerpted from the Student Guide to the Expository Writing Program.
Students should assume these general principles apply to all courses at USC unless an individual instructor gives explicit alternate
instructions for his or her assignment.
By its very nature, writing involves both individual and collaborative activity. Even when a piece of writing has but one author, that
author employs a language system that is shared with others and draws upon ideas and values that are not his or hers alone. Indeed,
one of the most important parts of becoming a writer within the academic community is learning how to balance the obligations of
individuality and collaboration. As a college writer, you are expected to use writing to develop and assert your own ideas and beliefs -to think for yourself. But at the same time you are expected in college writing to engage the thinking of others, to place your own
writing within the context of academic discourse by using or criticizing arguments from that discourse. This double obligation provides
a framework in which to discuss plagiarism.

Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the unacknowledged and inappropriate use of the ideas or wording of another writer. Plagiarism undermines the
intellectual collaboration -- the exchange of ideas -- that should mark academic discourse because it permits the writer to avoid any
genuine involvement with the concepts or opinions of others. Because the false discourse of plagiarism corrupts values to which the
university community is fundamentally committed -- the pursuit of knowledge, intellectual honesty -- plagiarism is considered a grave
violation of academic integrity and the sanctions against it are correspondingly severe (sanctions recommended by the university range
from a grade of "F" in the course to suspension from the university). Most simply, plagiarism can be characterized as "academic theft."
As defined in the University Student Conduct Code, published in the current SCampus (p.123, 11.11), plagiarism includes:

"The submission of material authored by another person but represented as the student's own work, whether that material is
paraphrased or copied in verbatim or near verbatim form;"

"The submission of material subjected to editorial revision by another person that results in substantive changes in content or
major alteration of writing style;" and

"Improper acknowledgment of sources in essays or papers."

Avoiding Plagiarism
Because of the serious penalties for plagiarism, you should insure that any writing you submit represents your own assertions and
abilities and incorporates other texts in an open and honest manner. The best way to avoid plagiarism is to be careful to document your
sources, even when you are only making use of data or ideas rather than an actual quotation. In academic assignments, writing is
assumed to be the original words and thoughts of the student unless told otherwise (i.e.: material from other sources is clearly and
properly cited).

53

When to Document Outside Sources

Example 1
Repeating Another's Words Without Acknowledgment
Original Source
(From Neil Postman. Amusing Ourselves to Death. New York: Penguin, 1985. 127-128.)
The television commercial is the most peculiar and pervasive form of communication to issue forth from the electric plug....The move
away from the use of propositions in commercial advertising began at the end of the nineteenth century. But it was not un til the 1950's
that the television commercial made linguistic discourse obsolete as the basis for product decisions. By substituting images for claims,
the pictorial commercial made emotional appeal, not tests of truth, the basis of consumer decisions.

Plagiarized Version
(essentially verbatim)
Television commercials have made language obsolete as a basis for making decisions about products. The pictorial commercial has
substituted images for claims and thereby made emotional appeal, rather than tests of truth, the basis of consumer decisions.

Although the writer has changed, rearranged, and deleted words in the version above, the text is essentially the same as the
original source. In paraphrasing, you take the writer's ideas and put them in your own words. It is not a process of s
ubstituting synonyms or rearranging the order of words. Even if the version above gave credit to Postman for his ideas, the
passage would be considered plagiarized.
Correctly Paraphrased and Documented Version
Postman argues that television commercials do not use language or "test of truth" to help viewers decide whether to buy a product.
Instead, they relay on images to create an emotional appeal that influences consumers' decisions (127-128).

In the correctly paraphrased and documented version above, most of the ideas have been paraphrased or restated in the
writer's own words. Quotation marks have been placed around a key phrase that is taken directly from the original source.
In addition, the name of the author refers readers to a corresponding entry in the Works Cited page, and the page number
indicates the location of the information in the source cited.

Example 2
Presenting Another Writer's Argument or Point of View Without Acknowledgment
Original Source
(From Arlene Skolnick. Embattled Paradise. New York: Basic Books, 1991. 11.)
The changes in larger society, as well as their reverberations in the family, call into question basic assumptions about the nature of
American society, it family arrangements, and Americans themselves. A "Cultural struggle" ensues as people debate the m eaning of
change. One of these periods of cultural upheaval occurred in the early decades of the nineteenth century; a second occurred in the
decades just before and after the turn of the twentieth century. For the last thirty years, we have been living through another such wave
of social change.
Three related structural changes seem to have set the current cycle of family change in motion: first, the shift into a "postindustrial"
information and service economy; second, a demographic revolution that not only created mass longevity but reshaped the individual
and family life course, creating life stages and circumstances unknown to earlier generations; third, a process I call "psychological
gentrification," which involves an introspective approach to experience, a greater sense of one's own ind ividuality and subjectivity, a
concern with self-fulfillment and self-development. This is the change misdiagnosed as narcissism.

Plagiarized Version
Three periods of cultural upheaval in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries have caused major changes in American society. The first
occurred during the beginning of the nineteenth century, the second during the decades before and after 1900, and the th ird has been
underway for the last thirty years. Three structural changes occurring during the current upheaval are primarily responsible for
changes in American families. These include the development of a postindustrial information and service economy , demographics
changes (including longer life spans that have created new and different life stages), and an increased sense of individuality including
a desire for self-fulfillment and self development.

The writer of the passage above correctly paraphrases Skolnick's ideas but does not give her credit for her ideas or line of
argument. The version below eliminates the plagiarism by attributing the ideas to Skolnick.
Correctly Documented Version
According to Skolnick, three periods of cultural upheaval in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries have caused major changes in
American society. The first occurred during the beginning of the nineteenth century, the second during the decades before and after
1900, and the third has been underway for the last thirty years. Three structural changes occurring during the current upheaval are

54

primarily responsible for changes in American families. These include the development of a postindustrial informat ion and service
economy, demographics changes (including longer life spans that have created new and different life stages), and an increased sense of
individuality including a desire for self-fulfillment and self development (11).

In the version above, a reader would be able to locate the source by finding the title of Skolnick's book in the Works Cited
page and looking on page 11, the number indicated at the end of the paragraph.

Example 3
Repeating Another Writer's Particularly Apt Phrase or Term Without Acknowledgment
Original Source
(From Arlene Skolnick. Embattled Paradise. New York: Basic Books, 1991. 11.)
Three related structural changes seem to have set the current cycle of family change in motion: first, the shift into a "postindustrial"
information and service economy; second, a demographic revolution that not only created mass longevity but reshaped the individual
and family life course, creating life stages and circumstances unknown to early generations; third, a process I call "psychological
gentrification," which involves an introspective approach to experience, a greater sense of one's own indiv iduality and subjectivity, a
concern with self-fulfillment and self-development. This is the change misdiagnosed as narcissism.

Plagiarized Version
The large number of "self-help" books published each year attest to Americans' concern with self-improvement and achieving more
fulfilling lives. This process might be described as "psychological gentrification."

Correctly Documented Version


The large number of self-help books published each year attest to Americans' concern with self-improvement and their desire to have a
more fulfilling life. Skolnick labels this process as "psychological gentrification" (11).

As the example above illustrates, putting quotation marks around a borrowed word or phrase is not sufficient
documentation. You must also acknowledge the author and give the page numbers so a reader would be able to consult the
original source and loc ate the word or phrase. In the original source, Skolnick takes credit ("a process I call") for coining
the term "psychological gentrification." Quotation marks in the original appear to be used for emphasis. Phrases in
quotations should be cited unless they have become common usage (e.g., "postindustrial" in the original source above).

Summary
Students should be aware that the above information addresses general standards taught by the Expository Writing
Program concerning plagiarism and citation of sources. Individual instructors in all university courses may specify
additional requirements for their assignments, and the instructor responsible for an assignment should be consulted
when students have questions regarding standards for that assignment.
Resources

Your professor.
Instructors may require more specific standards for documenting source materials in written assignments. Any questions or
uncertainty about citation should be addressed to the instructor for the course, either during established office hours or by
arrangement.
The Writing Center.
Part of the Expository Writing Program, the Writing Center (THH-310, 740-3691) offers tutoring for writing papers and
improving writing skills for students at all levels.
SCampus.
All students should have received a copy of this student guidebook which contains the Student Conduct Code, other policies
applicable to students, and information about university resources available to assist students in their pursuit of academic
success. The SCampus is available in printed form at Topping Student Center.

55

Appendix D:
Academic Integrity: A Guide for Graduate Students
Please read the following document concerning academic integrity at USC: http://www.usc.edu/studentaffairs/SJACS/docs/GradIntegrity.pdf .

Appendix E: Dont Do This: Quiz on Academic Integrity


Quiz may be found online at: http://www.usc.edu/student-affairs/student-conduct/aiansw.html#a2
Introduction
So that you don't cheat yourself out of the best possible education at USC, you need to learn what constitutes academic dishonesty.
Take the following quiz to test your present knowledge.
Question 1:
You realize that another student is looking at your test paper. You don't know the second student, but you don't make any effort to cover
your paper. We know the other student is cheating but are you guilty of academic dishonesty?Answer
Question 2:
The final exam in your class is a take-home test. The professor's instructions state that you may only consult the following resources:
library books, class notes, texts, and the professor or TA. You and your roommate discussed one of the questions, but you wrote your
own answer. Is this a problem? Answer
Question 3:
You spent hours writing an excellent research paper for your English class in the Fall. You have to do a research paper on any topic for
your sociology class this semester. Is it wise to turn in the same paper? Answer
Question 4:
You have been ill and have gotten behind in your classes. You want to ask your professor for an "incomplete" in his class, but you're
not sure whether he'll be convinced. You didn't see a doctor while you were ill, but you have a doctor's excuse from a previous illness
which you could alter with little difficulty. After all, you were sick, weren't you? Answer
Question 5:
You are enrolled in a large lecture class. Due to the size of the class, the professor has two teaching assistants who grade the tests. As
the professor hands back the results of the first test, she encourages all students to check their papers carefully, with the instruction to
resubmit any test which may have been graded unfairly. Looking over your paper, you noticed that you inadvertently left out one
sentence which changed the meaning of your answer. Since you knew the material at the time of t he test, you pencil in the omitted
sentence and resubmit the paper for grading. Is this a problem? Answer
Question 6:
You have been working on a major class project when you find solution related material on a university computer network. The
solution is for the problem as assigned in the course during a previous semester, but it would form a good basis for solving the problem
you are working. Is it wise to copy the solution and use it? Answer
Question 7:
It is late at night and your paper is due at 9:00 a.m. the next day. You used a lot of material from a couple of books, but you didn't quote
anything and, therefore, you didn't include any footnotes. Is this plagiarism or just sloppy work? Answer
Question 8:
You have had a tough semester and are having trouble focusing on a term paper you must write. You have acquired "research
material", a paper from the World Wide Web on your topic, that will get you started with information and organization. With all the
other pressures, it seems tempting to make a few minor changes and turn the paper in. Should you? Answer
Question 9:
You came to USC to major in Esoterica because the university has one of the best divisions in the nation. However, the introductory
course has been a bit tedious and you haven't kept up with the reading like you should have. It is now the first midterm, and because
you are unprepared you are thinking of taking a few crib-notes in the back of your bluebook. After all, don't you just need to have the
class on your record so that you can get on to the important stuff? Answer

56

Here is the answer sheet! Note: the sanctions recommended are for undergraduate students. Graduate students are
expected to know all of this already and therefore are held to much higher standards suspension from the university is
usually minimum for graduate students.
Question 1:
You realize that another student is looking at your test paper...
Answer:
Yes. Even though you and the other student didn't work together, once you became aware that the other student was looking at your
paper, it was your responsibility to take steps to make it difficult for him to cheat.
Recommended Sanction:
F for course for both students. Return to Academic Integrity Quiz
Question 2:
The final exam in your class is a take-home test...
Answer:
Yes, it is called collusion. Studying together before the test would have been all right, but once you had the test and knew the questions,
the professor expected you to do all the thinking about the answers by yourself.
Recommended Sanction:
F for course. Return to Academic Integrity Quiz
Question 3:
You spent hours writing an excellent research paper...is it wise to turn in the same paper?
Answer:
No, not without the permission of both professors. Our rules prohibit using the same essay, term paper or project in more than one
course without permission of the instructors. Remember it is always scholastic dishonesty if your action allows you to obtain an unfair
academic advantage. For example, you would have the assistance from your previous professor's comments and instructions and also
save all the time that your classmates are using to write the paper. In addition, your professor assumes that you are writing an original
paper for this class.
Recommended Sanction:
F for course. Return to Academic Integrity Quiz
Question 4:
You have been ill and have gotten behind in your classes...you have a doctor's excuse from a previous illness...
Answer:
Not a good idea. Documentary falsification is dishonesty, whether or not the falsification supports "the truth". Faculty have a tendency
to check on medical excuses, so apart from undermining your own integrity you stand a good chance of being caught. Students often
neglect the obvious in this kind of case: talk to your professor. He or she may be able to offer suggestions or alternatives for relieving
your situation.
Recommended Sanction:
F for the course. Return to Academic Integrity Quiz
Question 5:
As the professor hands back the results of the first test...you noticed that you inadvertently left out one sentence which changed the
meaning of your answer...
Answer:
Yes. Unfortunately, the professor cannot grade your good intentions. Tests submitted for regrading may not be altered in any way. By
the way, professors are encouraged to photocopy exams before returning them to the student and therefore can clearly track any new
markings on exams submitted for regrading.
Recommended Sanction:
F for course and recommendation for further disciplinary action (possible suspension)
Return to Academic Integrity Quiz

57

Question 6:
You have been working on a major class project when you find solution related material on a university computer network...
Answer:
Instructors expect individual, original work in response to assignments. Copying from previous semester's assignments, solutions
manuals or other sources defeats the educational purpose of the assignment. It is unacceptable for stud ents to obtain solutions, copy
assignments or collaborate with others without the knowledge and permission of the instructor.
Recommended Sanction:
F for the course. Return to Academic Integrity Quiz
Question 7:
It is late at night and your paper is due at 9:00 a.m. the next day...you didn't quote anything and, therefore, you didn't include any
footnotes...
Answer:
This is plagiarism. Submitting someone else's work for credit as if it were your own is plagiarism. If you are unsure about when to use
quotations and footnotes, be sure to talk to your professor before submitting the paper.
Recommended Sanction:
F for course. Return to Academic Integrity Quiz
Question 8:
You have had a tough semester and are having trouble focusing on a term paper you must write...You have acquired "research
material" that will get you started with information and organization...
Answer:
Don't! Faculty have an uncanny ability to spot papers that were not written for their classes or which are not your work, and the
consequences to you are severe. In fact, don't acquire (borrow, download or purchase) a paper for "research purposes". You almost
certainly can come up with better material yourself, and you avoid the temptation of doing the wrong thing at the last minute.
Researching term papers is an integral part of your university education -- don't short-change yourself.
Recommended Sanction:
F for the course, suspension from the university. Return to Academic Integiry Quiz
Question 9:
... because you are unprepared you are thinking of taking a few crib-notes in the back of your bluebook....
Answer:
This is never a good idea. First, you cheat yourself out of important knowledge you will need later. If the course is graded
competitively, you cheat others as well. And if you are caught (notes in a bluebook is a well-known form o f cheating) you may defeat
your purpose.
Recommended Sanction:
F for the course. Return to Academic Integrity Quiz
This may be your first quiz at USC, and may be the only one you have absolute control over passing -- by avoiding behavior that is
academically dishonest. As you can see, what comprises academic dishonesty is not always obvious. If you are in doubt, ask your
professor. The Office for Student Conduct, Fig. 107, (213) 740-6666, has a complete list of student's rights during academic
integrity reviews; the official policies of the University are in the SCampus. Remember, you can be the best...honestly !

58

Appendix F:
American Psychological Association (APA) Format Requirements for Papers
The APA Publication Manual is utilized by many professional journals including the American Journal of Occupational Therapy as a
guide for manuscript submissions. Therefore, it is important for students to be familiar with these guidelines. The professional
program faculty have designated the following areas as essential requirements for all papers assigned in the program. Students papers
that do not accurately follow these APA guidelines will be negatively impacted. Students are required to purchase the Publication
Manual of the American Psychological Association (Fifth Edition) that provides details regarding these criteria.
Title page
Reference list (note page 218 regarding on-line references)
Reference citations in text
Page numbers
Margins
Font type and size
Line spacing
Abbreviations
Direct quotes
Further information may be found at www.apastyle.org. Some tips are available on-line at http://www.apastyle.org/previoustips.html

Appendix G:
Major Emergency Procedures for USC OS/OT Students
Emergencies such as earthquakes, civil disturbances, fires, and other major incidents can strike without warning. All students should
be aware of procedures to be followed and sources of information in the event of a major campus emergency. Please visit
http://emergencyprep.usc.edu/ to familiarize yourself with university procedures. All students are urged to register with TrojansAlert
(see Emergency Webpage).
EMERGENCY INFORMATION
In the Event of An Emergency
In the event of an emergency, information regarding conditions on the campus will be posted at http://emergency.usc.edu. Or call the
Emergency Information Line at (213) 740-9233.
For emergency information related specifically to the Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, call (323) 4422850.
UNIVERSITY EMERGENCY OPERATIONS
In a major emergency, the University will establish an Emergency Center in the CHP Building, in the Risk Management and Safety
Office. USC emergency teams will be dispatched to all areas of the campus to assist with urgent problems should the emergency
warrant.
To Report An Emergency
Call the USC Department of Public Safety at (213) 740-4321 on the University Park Campus or (323) 442-1000 on the Health Sciences
Campus. Or call 911.
EVACUATION
If the building appears to be unsafe and must be evacuated, the outdoor evacuation assembly point for the Division of Occupational
Science and Occupational Therapy will be the center of the parking lot in front of the main entrance. Evacuation will be facilitated by
safety team members, who will direct building occupants to stairways, assist in ensuring that all building occupants evacuate safely,
and account for personnel at the assembly area. If evacuation is necessary, the emergency coordinator and safety team and available
volunteers shall assist individuals with disabilities.

EMERGENCY ON THE WEEKENDS, EVENINGS, AND HOLIDAYS

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Call the University's emergency information line and the Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy information line
for updates.
EMERGENCY IN THE CLASSROOMS
In the event of an emergency during a class, the faculty member present shall provide guidance to students in safe emergency
procedures.
EMERGENCY DURING FIELDWORK
All students on Level II fieldwork are under the direct supervision at the placement site. They are to inform and provide each of their
supervisors with an emergency telephone contact. If an emergency happens during Level I fieldwork, students will follow procedures at
each one of their sites. Students should call the Division to inform the Coordinator of Fieldwork Education of their status if possible.
EARTHQUAKE
During an earthquake, duck and cover under a desk or table, or near an interior wall, and hold on until the shaking stops. When the
shaking stops, assist others in the area, report any serious problems, and evacuate if the area appears unsafe, using stairways, not
elevators. Assemble at the outside evacuation assembly area.
CIVIL DISTURBANCE
In the event of civil disturbance, all personnel will be informed of developments by FAX, voicemail broadcast, and other means.
Depending on the situation, members of the campus community may be advised to remain temporarily on campus and inside a
building. Emergency teams will inform everyone in the campus community of recommended safety measures and alerts.

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STUDENT AGREEMENT FORM

I have received and read the USC Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy Student
Handbook. I understand that I am responsible for all materials therein:

Signature:

Name (Printed Legibly):

______________________________________

______________________________________

Student I.D. Number: ______________________________________

Date: ______________________________________

(Please print, sign, and return to OT Office (CHP-133) for filing during first week of session.)

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