You are on page 1of 11

Stage 1 Desired Results

ESTABLISHED GOALS Transfer

Standards:
Students will be able to independently use their learning to
NETS-S
5a use technology to locate, evaluate,
1. Differentiate between the different types of rock.
and collect information from a variety of
2. Examine what the Earth is made out of and how those
sources.
materials are shaped by natural processes.
6a use technology resources for solving
3. Identify how the systems of Earth affect what happens
problems and making informed
to natural materials.
decisions.
4. Design and Construct a structure using Earths natural
6b employ technology in the
materials that can protect human life during a natural
development of strategies for solving
disaster.
problems in the real world
AK State Standards:
Science Meaning
D2 develop an understanding of the
origins, ongoing processes, and forces
that shape the structure, composition, UNDERSTANDINGS ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
and physical history of the Earth.
E2 develop an understanding that Students will understand 1. What forces and
solving problems involves different that processes shape and
ways of thinking, perspectives, and 1. Earths systems and change the Earth?
curiosity that lead to the exploration of processes affect the way 2. What is the Earth made
multiple paths that are analyzed using Earth looks over time. of?
scientific, technological, and social 2. The materials that Earth 3. What processes cause
merits. is made out of are Earths features to look
Technology shaped by Earths the way that they do?
A2 use technological tools for learning, systems and forces. 4. How are people affected
communications, and productivity 3. Humans use Earths by Earths processes?
B1 identify and locate information materials for many 5. How can people protect
sources using technology different purposes. themselves from Earths
Cultural 4. Earths features have natural processes?
D5 identify and utilize appropriate shaped human
sources of cultural knowledge to find behaviors.
solutions to everyday problems
Acquisition
ISTE:
3d Students build knowledge by actively
exploring real-world issues and Students will know Students will be skilled at
problems, developing ideas and
theories and pursuing answers and 1. The 3 types of rocks, the 1. Using scientific
solutions. properties and materials language to discuss the
6c students communicate complex of rocks and minerals, Earths systems and
ideas clearly and effectively by creating and how humans use processes
or using a variety of digital objects such them. 2. Observing Earths
as visualizations, models, or 2. That natural disasters features, systems, and
simulations. are caused by Earths processes
NGSS: natural processes. 3. Identifying the types of
3-5-ETS1-1 Define a simple design 3. How humans can reduce rocks and how we use
problem reflecting a need or a want that the impact of natural them.
includes specified criteria for success disasters to human life. 4. Comparing and
and constraints on materials, time, or 4. What challenges contrasting the best way
costs. engineers face when to protect human life
5-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine building structures that when designing new
information about ways individual can withstand natural structures and the best
communities use science ideas to disasters materials to use for the
protect the Earths resources and job.
environment.

Stage 2 - Evidence

Evaluative Assessment Evidence


Criteria

PERFORMANCE TASK(S):

Students can Students will be given a rock and they will create and design a poster online about
explain different that rock. They will turn the poster into a digital presentation with voice overlay using
types of rocks Aurasma.
and how we
use them. Category 4 3 2 1

Information Information on Information on Information is Almost all of the


poster includes poster includes included in the information about
the name of the the name of rock, poster. A few of the rock is
rock, rock type, how the rock was the topics of missing.
how the rock was formed, the information about
formed, the description of the the rock are not
description of the rock, how the included. Details
rock including rock is used, and are missing.
color, texture and where it can be
hardness, uses found. Some
for the rock, and details about
where the rock description, uses,
can be found and locations are
left out.

Technology Uses technology Uses technology Uses technology Did not use
NETS-S 5a to locate, to locate, to locate, technology to
evaluate and evaluate and evaluate and locate, evaluate
AK State collect information collect information collect information and collect
Standards from a variety of from a couple of from one sources. information from a
Technology sources. sources. The student variety of
A2, B1 The student uses The student minimally uses sources.
tech tools for mostly uses tech tech tools for The student does
learning, tools for learning, learning, not use tech tools
communications, communications, communications, for learning,
and productivity and productivity and productivity communications,
Student can Student can Student can and productivity
identify and locate mostly identify identify and locate Student cannot
information and locate very little identify and locate
sources using information information information
technology. sources using sources using sources using
technology. technology. technology.

Organization Organization of Poster is mostly Poster is not Poster is


the poster is neat, and organized very incomplete and/or
presented neatly organized well. well. It may be a is organized
and in an Nothings is bit distracting to poorly. It is not
organized way. distracting, and it look at and/or is easy to read.
Information is is still easy to difficult to read.
presented clearly read. Some
and nothing information may
distracts from the be presented in a
information. less organized
manner.

Timeliness Student has used Student used Student did not Student did not
all of class time most of class time use most of their use class time
wisely and they wisely and their time wisely. Their wisely. Their
completed their project is mostly project is not project is very
project. complete. complete. incomplete.

Mechanics Spelling and Most spelling and Some spelling Many spelling and
Grammar are Grammar are and grammar grammar errors
correct on their correct on their errors on poster. on poster.
poster. poster.

Students use
their knowledge Students will make a brochure about travelling through the rock cycle.
of the rock
cycle to apply Category 4 3 2 1
their knowledge
Layout and Organization of Poster is mostly Poster is not Poster is
creatively about
Design the poster is neat, and organized very incomplete and/or
the processes a presented neatly organized well. well. It may be a is organized
rock goes and in an Nothings is bit distracting to poorly. It is not
organized way. distracting, and it look at and/or is easy to read.
through in a Information is is still easy to difficult to read.
travel brochure. presented clearly read. Some
and nothing information may
distracts from the be presented in a
information. less organized
manner.

Content Student develops Student mostly Student has a Student does not
AK State an understanding understands the basic understand the
Standards of the origins, origins, ongoing understanding of origins, ongoing
Science D2
ongoing processes, and the origins, processes, and
processes, and forces that shape ongoing forces that shape
forces that shape the structure, processes, and the structure,
the structure, composition, and forces that shape composition, and
composition, and physical history of the structure, physical history of
physical history of the Earth. composition, and the Earth.
the Earth. physical history of
the Earth.

Mechanics Spelling and Most spelling and Some spelling Many spelling and
Grammar are Grammar are and grammar grammar errors
correct on their correct on their errors on on brochure.
brochure. brochure. brochure.

Timeliness Student has used Student used Student did not Student did not
all of class time most of class time use most of their use class time
wisely and they wisely and their time wisely. Their wisely. Their
completed their brochure is brochure is not brochure is very
brochure. mostly complete. complete. incomplete.

Technology Uses technology Uses technology Uses technology Did not use
NETS-S 5a to locate, to locate, to locate, technology to
evaluate and evaluate and evaluate and locate, evaluate
collect information collect information collect information and collect
from a variety of from a couple of from one sources. information from a
sources. sources. variety of
sources.

Students can
Students design a structure using SketchUp and then recreate a model of their
demonstrate
structures framework. Structures will go through an earthquake simulation to see if
knowledge of
they make it through the earthquake.
necessary
safety
Score Description
precautions a
building would 4 Student completed a 3-dimensional structure using SketchUp. They recreated the framework of
need to their structure using real life materials to create a model of their original design. Their design
was able to withstand a simulation of an earthquake.
withstand a
natural 3 Student mostly completed a 3-dimensional structure using SketchUp. They recreated the
disasters. framework of their structure using real life materials to create a model of their original design.
Their design was mostly able to withstand a simulation of an earthquake. Their structure
survived with minimal damage to the framework.

2 Students somewhat created a 3-dimensional structure using SketchUp. They mostly recreated
the framework of their structure using real life materials to create a model of their original
design. Their design suffered significant damage during a simulation of an earthquake. Their
structure did not survive with minimal damage

1 Students 3-dimensional structure using SketchUp was mostly incomplete. They mostly were
unable to recreate a real life model of their design. Their design did not survive during a
simulation on an earthquake.
OTHER EVIDENCE:

Students will be Self-Assessments:


able to critique Students make a self assessment on how prepared they are for an emergency in
their design and their structure design.
logically assess
their design. Check Criteria

Will your design protect the people inside and near your building?

Does your building design have any flaws or overhangings that may be dangerous in an
emergency?

Will people be able to evacuate your building quickly? Do you have enough exits for the size
of your building?

Is your building fire protected?

Do you have a safe and secure design?

Do you have clearly established exits?

Students can
Formative Assessments:
classify rock
Students will classify different rocks using rock samples into the categories
types and rock
igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary. Students will use Plickers to
formations into
classify them.
categories.
Students will classify rock formations and make scientific assumptions of
how they were formed based on scientific thought.
Students can
Database entries based on their research
identify and
Classroom Wiki contribution
research the
Concept Maps
properties and
Google Documents
uses of rocks
Science Notebook entries on their experiences and notes taken from lesson
and minerals.
and labs, claims based on evidence, and observation notes and
explanations.
Students will
investigate
emergency
preparedness
and how
humans can
lessen the
impact of
disasters.

Stage 3 Learning Plan

Summary of Key Learning Events and Instruction


Week 1

1. Introduce essential questions to students. W


2. Show students several pictures of rock formations on the projector. Ask them to make a
quick sketch of them and briefly write how they think they formed. H, W
3. Give students several rock samples. Ask them to make observations of them, look for
similarities and differences, and suggest properties geologists look for when examining
rocks. Ask probing questions about what students are observing and what they think
geologists look for when studying rocks when monitoring the room W, H, E 1
4. Make a list of the properties that students mention and guide them to come up with color,
texture, hardness, luster, streak, and cleavage. You may need to introduce terms students
are not familiar with. Students will list these in their science journal and what they mean for
future reference.
5. Read aloud Rocks: Hard, Soft, Smooth and Rough by Natalie M. Rosinsky. Discuss how
geologists classify rocks. Ask students to describe what a rock is in their own words. W , H, E
1
6. Give groups of two students a rock and a mineral and ask them to find differences between
them. Ask students what properties are used to distinguish between rocks and minerals.
Hand out mineral identification cards and guide students to identify their rock and their
mineral or use online identification guides based on student observations. E 1
7. Refer back to what a mineral is with students in a class discussion. Tell them that they will
now be looking at ways to classify different types of rocks. W
8. Pass out rocks to groups of students and allow them to explore ways that they can
categorize and classify them. Ask probing questions about their observations of their rocks.
Ask students how they are classifying them. H, E 1
9. Discuss how geologists classify rocks based on how they are formed. Introduce students to
the ways geologist classify rocks (sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic). E 1
10. Allow students to explore the concepts of rock and mineral classification using online
simulations. E 1
11. Go back to the original pictures of rock formations and evaluate student learning by having
them identify the category of rock and how they believe it was formed. R, E 2

Week 2

1. Review essential questions with students. W


2. Give each will select their own unidentified rock. Tell them that they will be identifying their
own specific rock and creating a graphic poster of the properties of their rock to teach their
classmates about their specific rock. W, H
3. Allow students to observe their rock and identify the properties of their rock. Using a rock
identification guide online, a set of questions based on their observations, students will
identify their rock. H, E 1
4. Students will list their type of rock and the characteristics of their rock into the class
database, an excel sheet shared in google classroom, for all students to access and learn
about the different types of rocks and how humans use them for our benefit. E 1, O
5. Set students up with a Google Slide to make their poster. Give them the rubric so they know
what is expected on their poster. Allow students to design and create their poster within
those expectations. Students complete additional research to write all the properties and
uses of their rock and revise the notes they took on their rock in their observations. Record
an audio and visual recording of students presenting their rock poster E 1, R, T, O
6. Students will present their rock to their classmates using Aurasma. Students will overlay a
printed picture of their individual rock with their poster presentation of the properties of their
rock in a voice recording. H, E 1, T, O
7. Students will participate in a gallery walk through the classroom with the trigger images for
Aurasma placed on student desks. Students will walk with ipads and headphones to each
image and view each students presentation about their rock using Aurasma. H , E 1, T, O

Week 3

1. Review essential questions with students. W


2. Read Rocks on Rocks by Chris Oxlade. H, E
3. Distribute sample sedimentary rocks and observe the characteristics. Use Sedimentary
Rocks by Chris Oxlade as a resource E 1
4. Distribute sample igneous rocks and observe the characteristics. Use Igneous Rocks by
Chris Oxlade as a resource E1
5. Distribute sample metamorphic rocks and observe the characteristics. Use Metamorphic
Rocks by Chris Oxlade as a resource E1
6. Watch BrainPop:Rock Cycle H, E1
7. Break class into three research groups. Group 1 will research sedimentary rocks. Group 2
will research igneous rocks. Group 3 will research metamorphic rocks. W, E 1, O
8. Each group will collaborate and create a class wiki to share the information they gather and
research about their category of rocks including examples of the types of rocks in each
category. Students will refer back to their shared classroom database for examples. W, E 1,
R, E 2, T, O
9. Tell students they will be creating a brochure called Travel Through the Rock Cycle
pretending that their audience is a mineral and describe the processes they may go through
to become each type of rock. Students will use their class wikis to gather information about
all of the categories of rocks. Students create their brochure using a brochure template.
Allow students to draw their own images digitally or use found images. H , E 2, T, O
10. Set up your Plickers classroom account with a different multiple choice question for each
rock sample. The choices will be sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous. Assign each rock
sample a number that correlates to the Plickers question. Give table groups examples of
each rock sample and magnifying glasses. Tell students to look at sample 1, use what they
have learned and examine the rock and identify what category of rock it is. Hold up the
correct side of the plicker to make a selection. Do this with a few samples of each category
of rock. E 2, O

Week 4

1. Review essential questions with students. W


2. Show images of weathering on rock formations to students on the projector. Discuss how
they think each one was created. W, H, E 1
3. Ask each group to fill a container completely with no air and put the lid on it. Freeze
overnight and ask students to predict what will happen H, E 1
4. Display the frozen water in containers to the students. Ask, How do you think this might
impact rocks? E 1
5. Have students revise their predictions. R
6. Students work in small groups and rotate through five stations on weathering and erosion.
a. Station 1: Students place a sugar cube in a container with gravel and shake.
Students record qualitative and quantitative observations and draw diagrams.
Students answer What happened to the sugar cube? and How does abrasion
affect a rock over time? H, E, R, T
b. Station 2: Students draw observations of a penny and chalk in their science
notebooks. They place them in cups with vinegar and observe changes to the
minerals. Students answer What happened to the penny and chalk? and How
does acid rain affect a rock over time? H, E, R, T
c. Station 3: Premake mini glaciers by freezing ice over sand and gravel in tubs. Have
students predict what they think will happen when the clay and glacier interact. Give
students bricks of clay and have them slide the glacier over the clay Ask students,
What land formations may have been formed by glaciers? H, E, R, T
d. Station 4: Students create a sloped hill in a pan with soil. Students use a straw and
blow downhill and pour water down their hill. Students discuss how wind and water
affect rock formations. H, E, R, T
e. Station 5: Students weigh and graph a piece of chalk. Then they put the piece of
chalk in a jar of water for 3 minutes and swirl the water. Take out the chalk and
weigh and record the mass of the chalk. Repeat for 15 minutes. Students discuss
what affect waves have on rock formations. H, E 1, R, T
7. Ask students what erosion and weathering is. E 2
8. Revisit the images of rock formations in step 1. Have students identify the process
responsible for the formation. Include the effect the process has on humans. W, R, E 2
9. Students create a concept map of the rock cycle and how earths process can impact the
sediment and change the type of rock the minerals become. W, R, E 2, T, O

Week 5

1. Review essential questions with students. W


2. Students i nventory our classroom emergency kit and discuss the purpose of the kit and the
purpose of each item. Ask students if they think this kit alone will help us be prepared for a
natural disaster. W, H, E 1
3. Groups discuss the importance of emergency preparedness. E 1
4. Students watch demonstrations of natural disasters and view simulations online. H, E 1
5. Discuss how to reduce the impact of natural disasters on humans and what happens when
people do get caught up in natural disasters. W , E 1
6. Show students images on the projector of the dangers of natural disasters around the world.
H, E 1
7. Show students a video of Alaskas 1964 earthquake and ask them what natural disaster
would most likely hit Anchorage again? Allow students to discuss in groups. Ask them to
brainstorm some ideas they have as to how we can prepare for another earthquake of that
magnitude. Ask students if natural disasters can be prevented and what can humans do to
reduce the impact natural disasters have on humans? Allow students to think about this
question. W, H, E 1, R
8. Send students their own Google Doc in Google Classroom and show them how to gather
information online about being prepared in case of an earthquake. Prompt students to share
a couple of paragraphs about the information they have found on being prepared for an
earthquake using their own words and paraphrases while hyperlinking their resources on a
reference page. E 1, O
9. Prompt students to gather information about being prepared for an earthquake should one
hit, and refer back to the question how can humans reduce the impact natural disasters
have on humans. E 1, O

Week 6

1. Review essential questions with students. W


2. Ask students to share ways that humans can reduce the impact natural disasters have on
humans. Allow students to share their prior work. Ask students what kinds of people make a
living by ensuring the safety and integrity of buildings. W, H
3. Guide students in becoming engineers and architects this week and challenge them in
creating a structurally safe building of their choice using Sketchup and the rubric to guide
them in their design. Review the rubric and allow students to practice getting used to the
technology and have them explore and practice building shapes. H, E 1
4. Have students build their own structurally-safe design in Sketchup. H , E 1, T
5. Students are challenged in creating architectural models of their structures using found
objects in and around the classroom of their choice. H, T
6. Students are given a predetermined budget sent to them in a google spreadsheet. They may
purchase building materials for set prices as determined appropriate by the teacher (paper
clips, straws, index cards, cardboard etc.) E 1, T, O
7. Students start constructing a replica of their design from Sketchup, but allow students to
revise in order to create a disaster safe building. W, H, E 2, R, T
8. Students self-assess their building using the self-assessment to determine the level of safety
of their structure. They use this to make revisions as needed. R, E 2, O
9. When structures are complete, or the students have maxed out their budget, students place
their structure on a shake table and see if their structure is safe enough to overcome an
earthquake. E 2
10. Students assess their design using the rubric and write what they did well and what they
could have done differently next time to make their building even more safe. R , E 2, O