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HASS Assignment 4 – HASS Unit Plan & Justification Essay

Unit Plan
Sub strand: History Length: 4 weeks
Year level: 4 Concept focus
Year level theme The two main concepts to be covered and assessed in this
Students study aspects of Indigenous Australian life prior unit are ‘significance’, and ‘perspectives’ (Australian
to European arrival. Focus is on the diversity between Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA),
different Indigenous groups, and the relationships 2010; McInerney, 2018).
between these groups and their environments, expressed
through practices, knowledges, and beliefs. Students will begin to consider the perspective of some
examples of the many Indigenous Australian groups, the
importance that the land and sea hold to each group, and
Indigenous views on resource use.

With regards to significance, students will understand the


connections that Indigenous groups have with the
environment, how groups have managed the environment
and its resources over time, and consider their own
environmental practices in modern times.
Knowledge and Understanding Content Inquiry and Skills Content Descriptions
Descriptions covered covered
Year 4 HASS (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Year 4 HASS (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting
Authority (ACARA), 2010) Authority (ACARA), 2010)

History: The diversity of Australia's first peoples and the Questioning: Pose questions to investigate people, events,
long and continuous connection of Aboriginal and Torres places and issues (ACHASSI073).
Strait Islander Peoples to Country/Place (land, sea,
waterways and skies) (ACHASSK083). Researching: Locate and collect information and data from
different sources, including observations (ACHASSI074).
Geography: The custodial responsibility Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander Peoples have for Country/Place, Communicating: Present ideas, findings and conclusions in
and how this influences views texts and modes that incorporate digital and non-digital
about sustainability (ACHASSK089). representations and discipline-specific terms (ACHASSI082).

Knowledge and Understanding Achievement Inquiry and Skills Achievement Standards


Standards aspects assessed aspects assessed
History: Students describe the experiences of an Students develop questions to investigate.
individual or group in the past. Students identify the
interconnections between people and the environment. They develop questions about the past and locate, collect
and sort information from different sources to answer these
Geography: They identify the interconnections between questions.
components of the environment and between people and
the environment. Students develop and present texts,
including narrative recounts, using historical terms.
Brief description of the unit’s purpose Key Inquiry questions to guide unit thinking
Through study of Indigenous Australian life before  Who are the Indigenous people of Australia?
European settlement, students will develop an  How do Indigenous groups differ from each other?
appreciation for the ways in which people interact with  What was life like for the Indigenous people before
their environment. Europeans came to Australia?
Students will learn about the different practices diverse  What was important to them in their lives? Is this
Indigenous groups engaged in with regards to using different to what is important to Indigenous people
environmental resources, and how their knowledges and now? Or to us now? How?
beliefs influenced these practices.  What kind of technologies did Indigenous people
Students will consider these perspectives, and contrast have before the arrival of the Europeans? How did
them with European and ‘modern’ beliefs about resource they use them?
use and the environment, to inform a greater  In what ways were the Indigenous people connected
understanding of, and empathy for, the Australian to their environment? How are we connected to our
Indigenous people. Additionally, they can use these new own environment?
understandings to consider alternative approaches to
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environmental management in the present and for the  How do we know what we know about Indigenous
future. people? Where does our information come from?
 What can we learn from the Indigenous people and
the way they live that is relevant to us today?
Opportunities to incorporate Cross Opportunities to incorporate General
Curriculum priorities (CCPs) Capabilities General Capabilities (Level 3)
The unit focuses on the lives of Indigenous people, their
beliefs, and connection to their environments. These Intercultural Understanding: Challenge Stereotypes and
topics provide opportunities to directly link to the Prejudices – Students will challenge any pre-existing notions,
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and learning that Indigenous groups had diverse and complex
Cultures CCP. CCP links will include: practices, technologies, and belief systems.

OI.1: Australia has two distinct Indigenous groups: Critical and Creative Thinking: Pose Questions to Expand
Aboriginal Peoples and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, their Knowledge About the World – As students engage with
and within those groups there is significant diversity. the KWEL inquiry learning method, they will identify areas of
OI.3: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples have interest to them, and direct their learning around finding
holistic belief systems and are spiritually and intellectually answers to their own questions.
connected to the land, sea, sky and waterways.
OI.4: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies have Information and Communication Technology (ICT): Select
many Language Groups. and Evaluate Data and Information – During their research
OI.5: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ ways tasks, and with modelling and scaffolding, students will
of life are uniquely expressed through ways of being, scrutinise information sources for reliability, and filter out
knowing, thinking and doing. websites that are reductionistic towards Indigenous people
and their practices, etc.

Learning activities/experiences Assessment tasks


Map comparisons – European-based vs. Indigenous (W1, Formative
S1) 1. Exit cards for KWEL chart
Learning of songs and use of language (W1, S1) 2. Dreaming-style story written to explain an aspect of
Viewing and analysing videos of Dreaming Stories (W1, the student’s environment, or a behavioural
S2), and Song lines (W3, S1) guideline.
Creating own Dreaming-style Stories (W1, S2) 3. Song line-style map to direct a partner around the
‘Jigsaw’ activity to analyse and discuss information school.
sources in small groups (W2, S1) 4. Group poster of a seasonal menu for a certain
Group reading (W2, S2) Indigenous group. These will be compared to modern
Using informational resources to create seasonal menus European Australian culinary habits, and to a
(W2, S2) seasonal produce-based menu.
Creating own Song lines (W3, S1)
Using research, alongside critical thinking about sources,
to build and annotate dioramas depicting Indigenous
Summative
shelter types (W3, S2) and clothing (W4, S1) ‘Day in the Life’
Writing a journal entry-style narrative (W4, S2) Large Project-Based learning assessment, consisting of 3
parts:
Diorama creation – A type of shelter made and used by a
certain Indigenous group, with annotation explaining style
and material choices.
Diorama addition – A figure with clothing or body decoration
made or used by that certain Indigenous group, with
annotation explaining materials used and clothing
significance, as well as source use justification.
Narrative writing piece - A short, written journal entry from the
perspective of an Indigenous child, demonstrating the
students’ understanding of aspects of Indigenous life pre-
European times for their particular Language Group.
ICT resources available Learning resources available
Bureau of Meteorology’s (BOM) Indigenous Weather ‘The Girl from the Great Sandy Desert’, by Jukuna Mona
Knowledge website (BOM, 2016) – Descriptions of Chuguna – Book featuring fictional depiction of life in a
Seasons for different Indigenous groups, and the desert-dwelling Indigenous group, written with lived
resources (food, particularly) they accessed in each experience in mind.
season. Indigenous Australia map (Hortin, 1996) – Map of Indigenous
Kaurna Place Names Map (Land Services Group, n.d.) – Language Groups of Australia and their geographical
Dual or Indigenous names of places in Adelaide. locations.
Firestick artefacts.
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Song line of an Ancient Roadmap: Belief (Discovery
Channel, 2015) - Video example of a Song line, where an
elder is teaching about how to follow the path, according
to history and geographical landmarks.
Lesson outline for the 4 week unit Based on 2@90 minute periods per week
Week 1 Week 2
Session 1 Session 1
Differences in Indigenous groups – Languages Indigenous Technology & Practices – Firesticks
Learning intentions Learning intentions
Students will: Students will:
 Understand:  Understand:
o The Australian Indigenous people are not o Different groups of Indigenous Australians
a homogeneous people, but are made up had developed sophisticated and diverse
of different groups with diverse languages ways of living prior to European arrival, which
and practices. reflected their connection to the land and
 Know sea.
o Examples of diversity between  Know
Indigenous groups, particularly o The diversity of ways firesticks can be
geographical divisions and the existence constructed, the impact of their use upon the
of different, complex languages and environment, and their significance to
systems. different Indigenous groups.
 Be able to do:  Be able to do:
o Identify some of the Indigenous groups o Identify the uses of firesticks and ‘firestick
local to Adelaide and surrounds, and farming’, and the impact of these Indigenous
appreciate Kaurna language and cultural practices, by collecting information
pronunciation. from different evidence sources.

Assessment: Assessment:
Diagnostic assessment – Post-it notes by each student Formative assessment – Exit card Post-it note by each
about what they already know about Indigenous student about what they have learned about firesticks, how
Australians for the KWEL chart. they are made and used, how significant they have been in
Australian history, and their analysis of information source
Teaching strategies reliability. Teacher feedback provided.
 Using a photo as a stimulus (Australian
Broadcasting Corporation, 2016), students will be Teaching strategies
introduced to the unit topic ‘What was life like for  Through the use of inquiry questions and artefacts of
Indigenous Australians prior to European arrival?’. matches and firesticks, students will be asked to
 With teacher support, students will create a KWEL consider how Indigenous people could light a fire
wall chart about the topic – What we Know, Want without a match, and whether they feel fire was
to Know, Evidence we have collected, and have important to Indigenous groups. Students will add to
Learned. Students will use post-it notes to offer these ideas to the class KWEL chart.
prior knowledge and areas of interest to add to  A short discussion will be had about sources of
the wall chart. information and their reliability, and signs to look out
 Students will be given blank maps of Australia, for concerning biased or unreliable information.
and be instructed to label the states and territories  In a ‘jigsaw’ activity, students will break up into ‘home
and their capital cities. They will then compare groups’ and ‘expert groups’ to study information
their maps with a blank map of Indigenous about firesticks from different Indigenous groups
Australia (Hortin, 1996). They will then be asked if across the country, such as how they are made, who
they know of, and attempt to list in groups some they are made by, who they are used by, and how
of the Indigenous language groups. they are used.
 Teacher will guide an exploration of the  ‘Expert groups’ will also examine information about
Indigenous Australia map, looking at the groups in the significance of the firestick according to different
the Adelaide region and surrounds of SA (Kaurna, perspectives, including the Indigenous groups and
Ngadjeri, Ngarrindjeri, Narangga). European arrivals of the time, to modern Indigenous
 Students will look at some of the words used in and non-Indigenous people. Students are charged
the Kaurna language for places in Adelaide (Land with critically analysing their information for reliability
Services Group, n.d.; Kaurna Warra Pintyanthi, and bias, particularly with concern to homogenising
2018), identifying known places with dual names. or stereotyping Indigenous Australians.
 Students will learn the lyrics and actions to the  Students will take back the information from their
Kaurna version of ‘Heads, Shoulders, Knees and expert groups and present it to their home groups,
Toes’: ‘Mukarta, Katarka, Mampa, Tidni’ (Kaurna discussing the different perspectives and ideas each
for Kids, 2015), to learn an appreciation for the group encountered. In doing so, they will attempt to
Kaurna language in a familiar context.
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 Summarise lesson in conclusion, and add to answer some of the questions they identified in their
KWEL chart what students have learned. Want to Know part of the KWEL chart.
 The importance of reliable, unbiased information will
be discussed as a class, highlighted by the lesson
examples.
Session 2  To conclude the lesson, students will summarise
Indigenous Life – Belief Systems and Dreaming Stories
their understandings about Indigenous use of
Learning intentions
technology, and the significance of firesticks in
Students will:
Australia, such as to control invasive species or
 Understand: reduce chances of bushfire (Dick & Kingston, 2016;
o Australian Indigenous groups have Martin, 2014), both historically and today by
diverse and complex belief systems, completing an exit card to answer the KWEL section
which are unbreakably linked with their ‘What we have Learned’.
environment.
 Know
o Beliefs were passed on over generations
through the telling of Dreaming stories, Session 2
which teach about the origin of the land Indigenous Life – Food and Seasons
and animals, as well as guidelines for Learning intentions
living. Students will:
 Be able to do:  Understand:
o Articulate the teaching purpose of o Indigenous groups pre-European times had
dreaming stories, and create a story established complex understandings about
example using similar themes. their environment and its resources, which
influenced practices concerning food
Assessment: collection and use.
Formative assessment – Students will create a Dreaming-  Know
style story to explain an aspect of their environment, or a o Different groups had diverse understandings
behavioural guideline. Teacher feedback provided. of local weather patterns, and varied diets
and harvesting practices which were
Teaching strategies dependent on geographic location and
 Students will watch a video of the Malgana seasonal availability.
Dreaming story ‘The Buyungurra Who Didn’t  Be able to do:
Listen’ (McNeair, 2015), and brainstorm what they o Identify possible examples of diversity in the
noticed about the story. food of different language groups, and make
 They will then watch a video of the Kaurna connections between Indigenous food
‘Tjilbruke’ Dreaming story (Marymount College, practices and the potential benefits of
2016), and compare and contrast the ideas modern adoption of seasonal produce.
expressed in this story with the first video.
 In a class discussion, students will identify the Assessment:
purpose of Dreaming stories, and their intrinsic Formative assessment – In groups, students will create a
links to the environment. poster of a seasonal menu for different Indigenous groups.
 Using the videos as models, students will work in These will be compared to modern European Australian
groups to create their own Dreaming-style stories, culinary habits, and to a seasonal produce-based menu.
explaining either how a landmark or animal’s Teacher feedback provided.
features came into being, or a moral story about
human behaviour. Students will share their stories Teaching strategies
with the class.  Open with two Inquiry questions – ‘What does
 Summarise lesson in conclusion, and add to Summer mean to you?’ & ‘What does Winter mean to
KWEL chart what students have learned. you?’. In think-pair-share groups, have half of the
class discuss one question, whilst the other half
discusses the other. Bring class together to write
ideas on the board for each season.
 In same pairs, have students think about what the
seasons are, and what seasons might have meant to
Indigenous people pre-European arrival. How would
seasonal changes have affected their lives? Add
questions to KWEL chart.
 As a class, students will team read a fact sheet
(Department of Education (WA), 2010) about
Noongar seasons, and the way that these seasons
shaped their movement within their country and the
foods that they ate.
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 In small groups, students will use the Bureau of
Meteorology’s (BOM) Indigenous Weather
Knowledge website (BOM, 2016) to investigate the
division of seasons for different Indigenous groups.
They will create a poster to inform their classmates of
these established seasons, and what foods were
collected at what times of the year for that group and
their location. Posters will be presented between
groups.
 Students will compare the posters, and contrast
these with the typical European Australian diet, which
is rarely influenced by seasonal produce. Students
will suggest reasons why Indigenous-style seasonal
produce might be more environmentally sustainable.
Week 3 Week 4
Session 1 Session 1
Indigenous Life – Migration and Song lines Indigenous Technology – Clothing – ‘Day in the Life’ Part 2
Learning intentions Learning intentions
Students will: Students will:
 Understand:  Understand:
o Indigenous groups had, and continue to o There was, and still is, a great deal of
have, an intricate knowledge of the land diversity in the living practices of different
and seas, which is reflected in practices Indigenous groups, which was/is often
in daily life. influenced by their geographical location and
 Know environment.
o As part of travelling for seasonal or  Know
ceremonial reasons, Indigenous people o The types of clothing made by different
used their vast knowledge of the land to Indigenous groups, and how this suited that
create songs describing the land to particular group’s needs.
navigate across the country.  Be able to do:
 Be able to do: o Explain the differences in clothing styles and
o Acknowledge the Indigenous peoples’ materials used between different Indigenous
connection to their environments and groups, and identify the reasons for these
appreciate the care taken and skill differences.
involved in navigation through song lines.
Assessment:
Assessment: Summative assessment (ongoing) – Students continue to
Formative assessment – Students will create their own build upon their ‘Day in the Life’ diorama. Again, students will
(written) song lines to direct a partner to a spot around the source reliable information about their chosen Indigenous
school grounds. They will evaluate the level of success group and the types of clothing they made and used, and the
their partner experienced in navigating according to their purposes for these choices. They will make short written
directions. annotations to explain their learning and justify their
information source choices.
Teaching strategies
 Open with a stimulus question: ‘If you wanted to Teaching strategies
travel to Sydney by car, how would you make  Students will add to the KWEL chart about what they
sure you got to the right place? if you didn’t have already know about the Indigenous people and what
a map?’ Have this lead into an Inquiry question – types of clothing and body decorations they used.
‘How would Aboriginal people be able to move They will also add what type of things they would like
from place to place without a map?’. to know about traditional clothes.
 Use Colin Jones’ (2013) video to explain to  Using these Want to Know questions, the teacher will
students why Indigenous groups would move compile a list of questions for students to research,
around the country (for ceremonial reasons or such as what materials were used to make clothing,
when an environment started to become depleted what clothing and decorations looked like, etc.
of food), and how they used Song lines to  In the same Indigenous Language Group focus
navigate. groups, students will source reliable information to
 Show students a video example of a Song line, help them answer these questions. Where needed,
where an elder is teaching about how to follow the students can be directed to sources such as Koori
path, according to history and geographical History (2016) for help with finding information.
landmarks (Discovery Channel, 2015).  Using their research, they add to their diorama a
 Students will be introduced to their task: to design figure or figures with traditional-styled clothing or
a written song line in order to guide a partner to body decorations to represent their learnings.
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get from one place within the school to the other.  Like the previous lesson, they will also use dot points
They will need to use landmarks to guide their to summarise their learning, and explain the styles
partner, and can reference events that do or have and materials used by this Language Group in their
taken place somewhere to describe a location clothing designs. They will also justify what
along the way. Students will swap song lines with information they used to form their understandings,
their partner, and use the instructions to navigate and how they feel it is reliable.
their way to their unknown end point.
 As a conclusion, students will compare their
expectations with the results of where they/their
partner ended up, and discuss how it might feel to Session 2
have been a pre-European Indigenous person, Indigenous Life – Dear Diary – ‘Day in the Life’ Part 3
memorising song lines and following them in order Learning intentions
to navigate. Students will:
 Understand:
o There was, and still is, a great deal of
diversity in the living practices of different
Session 2 Indigenous groups, which was/is often
Indigenous Technology – Shelter – ‘Day in the Life’ Part 1 influenced by their geographical location and
Learning intentions environment.
Students will:  Know
 Understand: o Routines and practices undergone by
o Pre-European arrival, many Indigenous different Indigenous groups, such as
groups relocated on a cyclical basis, gathering food, travelling or building shelter,
which informed their living practices. and how these groups interacted with their
 Know environment as they carried out these tasks.
o The types of shelters built and used by  Be able to do:
different Indigenous groups, and the o Using the model and information learned in
purposes for the diversity in shelter styles. previous lessons, write a short narrative, in
 Be able to do: the form of a diary entry, of a day in the life of
o Explain the differences in shelter styles an Indigenous child from their assigned
and materials used between different language group.
Indigenous groups, and by many groups
lived in temporary accommodation rather Assessment:
than the permanent buildings that we live Summative assessment (conclusion) – Students write a short
in today. journal entry from the perspective of an Indigenous child in
from their allocated Language Group. This journal entry will
Assessment: form a companion to their dioramas, and illustrate some of
Summative assessment (ongoing) – Students will the practices they have shown in model form, to demonstrate
scrutinise information sources to find reliable information the students’ understanding of aspects of Indigenous life pre-
on a chosen Indigenous group. From this research, they European times. Teacher feedback provided.
will design the first part of their ‘Day in the Life’ dioramas
depicting the shelters that group, and form written dot Teaching strategies
point annotations to explain materials and shelter styles,
 Students will add to the KWEL chart about what they
and the reasons for these choices. Teacher feedback
have learned about the Indigenous people in this
provided.
unit, providing information to fill the What we have
Learned section of the chart.
Teaching strategies  The teacher will read a short example of a
 Students will revise previous lesson content about fictionalised journal entry, from the book ‘The Girl
how we can determine whether our information is from the Great Sandy Desert’, by Jukuna Mona
reliable – Where does it come from?, Is it written Chuguna, and point out how it describes some of the
by someone who knows what they’re writing normal events in the life of an Indigenous girl from
about?, Does it sound right according to what we the Walmajarri people in the desert areas of now-
already know?, etc. WA, SA, and NT.
 Students will add to the KWEL chart about what  Using their diorama annotations and previous
they already know about the Indigenous people learning of how their assigned Language Group
and what types of shelters they lived in. They will builds shelter, makes clothing, and the food that they
also add what type of things they would like to eat, students will develop a short narrative in journal
know about shelters. entry form. This journal entry will form a companion
 Using these Want to Know questions, the teacher to their group dioramas, and show their
will compile a list of questions for students to understanding of how different Indigenous groups
research, such as what materials were used to lived prior to European arrival, and the connections
build Indigenous shelters, what shelters looked between that group and their environment as
like, etc. evidenced by their social practices.
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 In groups that have chosen or been assigned an  These journal entries will be read to partners within
Indigenous Language Group, students will use the class.
their knowledge of reliable information sources to  As a conclusion activity, students will add any further
help them answer these questions. Teacher new understandings to the KWEL chart. They will
assistance can be given, such as directing also discuss how this unit influenced their thinking
students towards sites such as the Aboriginal about what it means to be Indigenous, how their
Culture website (Welch, 2017). opinions of Indigenous people have changed, and
 Once they have collected their answers, they will any ideas about how this unit and study of
go about building a diorama to represent their Indigenous beliefs and practices could influence
learnings. They will also need to write a short change in our own lives.
annotation to be displayed with their diorama,
explaining how this Language Group built and
utilised shelters, and why they built the styles that
they did. They will also justify what information
they used to form their understandings, and how
they feel it is reliable.
Potential HASS sub strand connections Potential other learning area connections
Geography: Looking at characteristics of places, English: Narrative writing – directly relates to the Year 4
comparing how Indigenous groups adapted their diet, English curriculum and to a planned unit for this practicum.
shelters, and clothing to the available resources in vastly
different geographical locations. Additionally, studying Mathematics: The use of directions, scales, and landmarks
how resource use relates to sustainability. when interpreting maps and describing locations.

Civics and Citizenship: Identification and understanding of Science: The relationship between humans, animals, and the
cultural groups within Australia, and cultural connections environment, particularly the ecological impact human activity
to one’s sense of identity and feeling of belonging within can have on various habitats and how to balance this impact.
society. Also, looking at materials and their properties, particularly
with regards to natural materials and why they serve different
purposes well.

Languages (Spanish): Identification of the variety of


languages spoken in Australian society, as well as exploring
the idea of language as a form of identity.
Topic background resources (for teacher use Pedagogical resources to support the teaching
only) to support teaching learning for the unit of the unit
Rickard, J. (2017). ‘Aboriginal Australians’, in Rickard, J. Jigsaw Learning Strategy: Frangenheim, E. (2005). Chapter
Australia: A Cultural History. 3rd edn. Monash University 4 - The Power of Three: Cooperative Strategies, in
Publishing, Melbourne. pp. 3-19. Retrieved April 19, 2018, Reflections on Classroom Thinking Strategies: Practical
from: Strategies to Encourage Thinking in your Classroom. 6th
http://web.b.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.flinders.edu.au/ehost/ edn. SAGE Publishing, California. Retrieved April 24, 2018,
ebookviewer/ebook?sid=1a07c782-18db-4639-91bd- from: https://flo.flinders.edu.au/pluginfile.php/2769489/
f46397e7e3c5%40pdc-v- mod_resource/content/4/Reading_1_Jigsaw.pdf.
sessmgr01&ppid=pp_3&vid=0&format=EB.
Inquiry Learning: Roberts, M. (2010). Geographical enquiry.
Hirst, J. (2014). ‘Why did Aboriginies not become Teaching Geography, 35(1), pp. 6-9. Retrieved April 24, 2018
farmers?’, in Hirst, J. Australian History in 7 Questions. from: https://search-proquest-
Black Inc., Victoria. pp. 5-26. com.ezproxy.flinders.edu.au/docview/232423673?accountid=
10910.
Bureau of Meteorology’s (BOM) Indigenous Weather
Knowledge website (BOM, 2016) – Descriptions of Purposeful Creative Teaching for History: Buchanan, J.
Seasons for different Indigenous groups, and the (2013). 'Creative teaching and assessment practices', in
resources (food, particularly) they accessed in each Buchanan, J. & Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary
season. Education, History, geography and civics: teaching and
learning in the primary years. Cambridge University Press,
Cambridge. pp. 109-129. Retrieved April 20, 2018, from:
https://flex.flinders.edu.au/file/5124c98d-d0b4-4b8c-a615-
1877934c3f1c/1/Creative%20teaching%
20and%20assessment%20practices.pdf
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Assessment rubric for the unit

A Day in the Life Name: _____________________________________

PROJECT RUBRIC
Components:
5 Points 4 Points 3 Points 2 Points 1 Point
Shelter is accurate
Shelter is Shelter is
for this Language
reasonably reasonably Shelter may not be
Group’s shelter Shelter not accurate
accurate for this accurate for this very accurate for
style and materials for this Language
Language Group. Language Group. this Language
Diorama: Shelter

used. Notes are Group. Few notes


Notes are detailed, Notes are given, Group. Few notes
very detailed, with are given.
with some with attempts are given, minimal
connections made Information about
connection made made to connect environmental links
to environmental environmental
to environmental with environmental are made, and
links between connections or
links, and links, but information used
humans and sources not
information used information used may be
habitat, and provided.
was mostly may be questionable.
information used
reliable. questionable.
was reliable.
Clothing is
accurate for this Clothing is Clothing is
Language Group’s reasonably reasonably Clothing may not
Clothing not
shelter style and accurate for this accurate for this be very accurate
accurate for this
materials used. Language Group. Language Group. for this Language
Diorama: Clothing

Language Group.
Notes are very Notes are detailed, Notes are given, Group. Few notes
Few notes are given.
detailed, with with some with attempts are given, minimal
Information about
connections made connection made made to connect environmental links
environmental
to environmental to environmental with environmental are made, and
connections or
links between links, and links, but information used
sources not
humans and information used information used may be
provided.
habitat, and was mostly may be questionable.
information used reliable. questionable.
was reliable.
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Detailed and
imaginative diary
entry describing
some of the
Narrative: Journal Entry

experiences a child Reasonable diary


Incomplete or
in this Language Detailed diary entry. Attempts Little detail in diary
unsatisfactory diary
Group and entry. Good made at entry. Little prior
entry. No attempts
location might environmental environmental learning or
made to incorporate
have experienced. links. Prior learning links. Some prior environmental links
prior learning or
Great evident. learning incorporated.
environmental links.
environmental links incorporated.
between humans
and habitat. Well-
grounded in prior
learning.

References

Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). (2016). Impact of European Settlement on Aboriginal


Tasmanians. Retrieved April 20, 2018, from: http://education.abc.net.au/splash-image-
servlet/mvcservlet/imageServlet/profile2/ABC-LIC-HIS140.

Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA). (2010). F-10 Curriculum:
HASS. Retrieved April 20, 2018, from: https://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/f-10-
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