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MENTORING AT COCA-COLA FOODS

COURSE ID: MBA509


SECTION: 01

SUBMITTED TO:
Dr.Nazmul Amin Majumder
SUBMISSION DATE : 27thMarch 2017

Submitted

by:

S.N ID Name

01 1610665 MD.Kamrul Islam

02 1721199 Kazi Nazmul Alam

03 1721319 Sonia Sultana

04 1510684 Rifat Azim

05 1510608 Rezwana Alam Tustee

06 1610652 Nurjahab Alam Pinky

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Letter Of Transmittal

27th March 2017

Dr .Nazmul Amin Majumder

Human Resource Management (MBA 509, sec-1)

Faculty member of School of Business,

Independent University Bangladesh (IUB)

Subject: A report on “Mentoring at Coca-Cola Foods.”

Dear Sir,

With due respect, I would like to inform you that I have complete report on “Mentoring at
Coca-Cola Foods”. It is immense pleasure for us because we have successfully completed
this report by receiving your continues guideline as a supervisor. We have endeavoured to
prepare this report from our level of best to accumulate relevant case & insightful
information. If we are included any wrong information in unconsciously so please forgive us
as your student. It is a great experience for us to make this report. We have tried to make the
report comprehensively within the schedule time & limited resource.

You’re sincerely

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Table of Contents
Introduction:............................................................................................................................................ 5
History .................................................................................................................................................... 5
Mission ................................................................................................................................................ 6
Vision................................................................................................................................................... 6
SWOT Analysis: ................................................................................................................................... 8
Products .............................................................................................................................................. 9
Competitors: ..................................................................................................................................... 10
Objective 1: ........................................................................................................................................... 12
Discuss the difference between mentoring and coaching based on the information in the case. .......... 12
Objective 2: ........................................................................................................................................... 15
Evaluate the ten part mentoring process used by Coca-Cola Foods? ................................................... 15
Obejctive:3 ............................................................................................................................................ 18
What conditions are important for the success of mentoring programme?........................................... 18
Recommendation: ................................................................................................................................. 19
References ............................................................................................................................................. 20

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Executive Summary

This report gives a detailed about the “Mentoring at Coca-Cola Foods”. It starts off by briefly
examining history of the brand to see how it becomes the world’s largest beverage company.
It also introduces the various products that the company offers.

This report goes on to introduce the various strategies that the company employs conducting
their operations. This report shows the company strength, weakness, opportunities and
threats. This report shows the managerial view to the company along with the Human
Resource Management. This report also shows the mentoring process and also gives the
details about the 10 part of mentoring process that helps the company to become more
successful.

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Introduction:

The Coca-Cola company is the world’s largest beverage company and is the leading producer
and marketer of soft drinks. Today, Coca-Cola is consumed throughout the world at the rate
of more than 600 million times per day and this figure is continuing to rise. However Coca-
Cola is not the sort of company to live in its past glories instead it looks to the future as a
challenge and constantly seeks new markets and ways of increasing its market share in areas
where it currently has a strong presence. It is the world’s largest producer and distributer of
syrups and concentrates for soft drinks. As we all know, the Coca is today’s one of the
biggest corporation that offers different refreshment in form of a soft-drink. But aside from
their historical success, the Coca Cola Company is still a typical business that is affected and
at the same time affecting the different type of communities. Coca-Cola has sold more than
one billion servings every day. More than 10,450 beverages are consumed every second. The
company achieved earnings of $4,347,000,000 in 2003. It is present on all seven continents
and is recognized by 94% of the world population. How did Coca-Cola grow from its humble
roots as a home-brewed Georgia-based patent medicine to be the international soft drink
powerhouse that it is today? Coca-Cola used numerous technologies to achieve its rise to the
top of the soft drink industry, defining new technologies and establishing paradigms that
popped the status quo like a cap from a soda bottle. Through technology, Coca-Cola
perfected Coke as a beverage and spread it throughout the world. Even today, the US soft
drink industry is organized on this principle. "The Coca-Cola Company" is now the largest
soft drink company in the world. Every year 800,000,000 servings of just "Coca-Cola" are
sold in the U.S alone.

History

Coca-Cola Enterprises, established in 1986, is a young company by the standards of the


Coca-Cola system. Yet each of its franchises has a strong heritage in the traditions of Coca-
Cola that is the foundation for this Company. The Coca-Cola Company traces it’s beginning
to 1886, when an Atlanta pharmacist, Dr. John Pemberton, began to produce Coca-Cola
syrup for sale in fountain drinks. However the bottling business began in 1899 when two
Chattanooga businessmen, Benjamin F. Thomas and Joseph B. Whitehead, secured the

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exclusive rights to bottle and sell Coca-Cola for most of the United States from The Coca-
Cola Company. The Coca-Cola bottling system continued to operate as independent, local
businesses until the early 1980s when bottling franchises began to consolidate. In 1986, The
Coca-Cola Company merged some of its company-owned operations with two large
ownership groups that were for sale, the John Lupton franchises and BCI Holding
Corporation's bottling holdings, to form Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. The Company offered its
stock to the public on November 21, 1986, at a split-adjusted price of $5.50 a share. On an
annual basis, total unit case sales were 880,000 in 1986. In December 1991, a merger
between Coca-Cola Enterprises and the Johnston Coca-Cola Bottling Group, Inc. (Johnston)
created a larger, stronger Company, again helping accelerate bottler consolidation. As part of
the merger, the senior management team of Johnston assumed responsibility for managing
the Company, and began a dramatic, successful restructuring in 1992.Unit case sales had
climbed to 1.4 billion, and total revenues were $5 billion.

Mission

The Coca Cola Company Mission. Our mission is: To refresh the world in mind, body and
spirit. To inspire moments of optimism and happiness through our brands and actions.”

Vision

The vision of Coca-Cola is the framework for their guides of every aspect of its business. It is
presented in 6Ps:

1. People: Be a great place to work where people are inspired to be the best they can be.

2. Portfolio: Bring to the world a portfolio of quality beverage brands that anticipate and
satisfy people's desires and needs.

3. Partners: Nurture a winning network of customers and suppliers, together They create
mutual, enduring value.

4. Planet: Be a responsible citizen that makes a difference by helping build and support
sustainable communities.

5. Profit: Maximize long-term return to shareowners while being mindful of our overall
responsibilities.

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6. Productivity: Be a highly effective, lean and fast-moving organization.

The Coca Cola Company Values

Our shared values guide our actions and describe how we behave in the world:

 Leadership: The courage to shape a better future


 Collaboration: Leverage collective genius
 Integrity: Be real
 Accountability: If it is to be, it's up to me
 Passion: Committed in heart and mind
 Diversity: As inclusive as our brands
 Quality: What we do, we do well

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SWOT Analysis:

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Products

Coca-Cola:

Coca-Cola is the most popular and biggest-selling soft drink in history, as well as one of the
most recognizable brands in the world.

Sprite:

Sprite is another product from Coca-Cola. It was introduced in 1961, Sprite is the world's
leading lemon-lime flavoured soft drink. Sprite is sold in more than 190 countries and ranks
as the No. 3 soft drink worldwide.

Fanta:

Introduced in 1940, Fanta is the second oldest brand of The Coca-Cola Company and our
second largest brand outside the US.

Diet Coke:

Diet Coke, also known as Coca-Cola light in some markets, is a sugar- and calorie-free soft
drink. It was first introduced in the United States on August 9, 1982, as the first new brand
since 1886 to use the Coca-Cola Trademark.

Coca-Cola Zero:

Coke Zero was Coca-Cola's largest product launch in 22 years and launched in 2005,
reaching billion-dollar status in 2007. Coca-Cola Zero offers great Coke taste, uplifting
refreshment and zero sugar.

Coca-Cola Life:

Coca-Cola Life is a reduced-calorie cola sweetened with cane sugar and stevia leaf extract.

Ciel:

Ciel is purified, noncarbonated bottled water that has been enjoyed by consumers since 1996.
Ciel Mineralizada, a bottled mineral water, became available in Mexico in 2001.

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Poweade:

Poweade combines carbohydrates, electrolytes with fluids for energy and hydration. It
quenches thirst and replenishes minerals and carbohydrates lost during sports or other intense
activities.

Coca-Cola light:

Diet Coke, also known as Coca-Cola light, is a sugar- and calorie-free soft drink.

Competitors:

Pepsi, the flagship product of PepsiCo, The Coca-Cola Company's main rival in the soft drink
industry, is usually second to Coke in sales, and outsells Coca-Cola in some markets. RC
Cola, now owned by the Dr Pepper Snapple Group, the third largest soft drink manufacturer,
is also widely available.

Around the world, many local brands compete with Coke. In South and Central
America Kola Real, known as Big Cola in Mexico, is a growing competitor to Coca-Cola. On
the French island of Corsica, Corsica Cola, made by brewers of the local Pietra beer, is a
growing competitor to Coca-Cola. In the French region of Brittany, Breizh Cola is available.
In Peru, Inca Kola outsells Coca-Cola, which led The Coca-Cola Company to purchase the
brand in 1999. In Sweden, Julmust outsells Coca-Cola during the Christmas season. In
Scotland, the locally produced Irn-Bru was more popular than Coca-Cola until 2005, when
Coca-Cola and Diet Coke began to outpace its sales. In the former East Germany, Vita Cola,
invented during Communist rule, is gaining popularity.

In India, Coca-Cola ranked third behind the leader, Pepsi-Cola, and local drink Thums
Up. The Coca-Cola Company purchased Thums Up in 1993. As of 2004, Coca-Cola held a
60.9% market-share in India. Tropicola, a domestic drink, is served in Cuba instead of Coca-
Cola, due to a United States embargo. French brand Mecca Cola and British brand Qibla
Cola are competitors to Coca-Cola in the Middle East.

In Turkey, Cola Turka, in Iran and the Middle East, Zamzam Cola and Parsi Cola, in some
parts of China, China Cola, in Slovenia, Cockta and the inexpensive Mercator Cola, sold only
in the country's biggest supermarket chain, Mercator, are some of the brand's competitors.
Classiko Cola, made by Tiko Group, the largest manufacturing company in Madagascar, is a

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serious competitor to Coca-Cola in many regions. Laranjada is the top-selling soft drink
on Madeira.

Coaching and mentoring are not recent phenomena. Edification of some kind has existed
since Homer’s Mentor advised Odyssesus and thus lent his name to this very human activity.
It was probably the goddess Athena herself, disguised as Mentor, Who guided Odyssesus son
Telemachus in search for his father. Whatever the case, these “wise and trusted counselors”
have remain a feature human interaction throughout the history. The common noun “mentor”
was first recorded in 1750. Interestingly, the etymology of the noun “coach” is actually
Hungarian. It is derived from the word for a vehicle or a carriage- the idea brings that
instructors carried their pupils!

Of course the connotations of both these words have widened significantly since they were
first recorded. Their relatively recent adoption into HR theory and practice has turn them into
verbs, implying institutionalized training strategy. According to the survey of training
managers by the CIPD in 19999, some 87 percent of UK companies have some kind of
coaching and mentoring scheme. There is certainly no shortage of books, papers and
conferences on the subject.

There are many kinds of coaching and mentoring-from life coaching to mentoring schemes
designed exclusively for women or minorities to corporate per-to-per mentoring or “buddy”
system.

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Objective 1:

Discuss the difference between mentoring and coaching based on the information in the
case.

Befor discussing about the differnce beteween mentorship and coaching , let give some idea
about them first.

Mentor:

Mentor is an experienced, productive senoir employee who hep to develop less expewrienced
employee.

Coaching:

Aper or an manger who works with an employee to motivate the employees. Help him or her
to develop skills and provie reinforcement and feedback.

Through mentorship and coaching we can develop interpersonal skills. Interpersonal skills
are various type of soft and hard skills. Soft skill are communication skil, leadership skill,
learn corprorate culture, decision making skill etc. And hard skills are various type of
technical skills.

PepsiCo SEO Indra Nooyi looks for mentors in all aspects of her life. She said “If i had
not had mentors, I wouldn’t be here today. I’m a product of great mentoring and
coaching...Coach and mentor are very important.” She credit the mentoring she receive
from people arround her for helping to break her glass ceilings in business.

Coaching

 A coaching process which involves people discussing their performance in


relationship to business goals is a process for building commitment.
 Coca-Cola Foods views coaching as an interaction that has the purpose of enhancing
performance. By providing goals, techniques, practice and feedback
 Coca-Cola Foods considers coaching a method for increasing accountability,
renewing commitment and facia ting continual learning.

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 Since coaching involves goal setting and feedback and environment is which
enhances continual and purposeful learning.
 The one on one discussion with one boss talking about performance enhancement
“wires in” accountability.
 The coach helps the person increase competency and profanity of success.
 The expected result are more highly skilled people who performed better and have
better working relationship.
 In coaching relationship is not of almost importance, rather the agreement that the
coaching is valuable critical element.
 Coaching can occur down the hierarchy, up it for laterally.

Mentoring

 Mentoring achieve his purpose primarily through building a relationship.


 It is a formal relationship structured around the development needs of the “mentee”.
In most case the mentor and mentee from different department so that there are no
direct reporting relationship involve. Mentoring at Coca-Cola Foods is the creation of
formal relationship between two different department and status in the organization.
 The mentor is usually someone “higher” up in the organization, someone who has
experience and knowledge about who’s who, what’s what and how things get done.
 The goal of mentoring relationship is to help the mentee understand the organization
and their role in better with the help of some one better in the organization.
 The mentee learns more about the culture, mission and context of how things get done
than he/she would if working alone
 Additionally mentee gains a confidant through neutral coach and observer who can
help the mentee plan a career within the organization.

Summaries the above discussion the difference among coaching and mentorship are

Mentorship Coaching
Helps to develop less experience employee Coaching helps to develop skills which is
for future career current job related.

Develop certain attitude and behavior which Develop certain hard skill within a certain
require long term relationship. period.

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May be formal or informal It’s formal process

Voluntary participation Mandatory participation

Mentoring is a long term process Coaching is a short term process

Very hard to reverse and re-learn Highly repetitive and re- learn

The mentor is usually someone “higher” up Coaching can occur down the hierarchy, up it
in the organization, for laterally.

Mentors helps mentee through providing Coach helps through day to activities,
career guideline reinforcement and feedback.

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Objective 2:

Evaluate the ten part mentoring process used by Coca-Cola Foods?

Coca-Cola Foods believes that human resource development is a key to building competitive
advantage through people and to the creation of a high performing organization. Coca-Cola
foods uses a ten part mentoring process. Now we evaluate the ten part mentoring process
used by Coca-Cola -----

1. Protege Identification
2. Identifying developmental needs
3. Identifying potential mentors
4. Mentor-protege matched
5. Orientation for mentors and proteges
6. Contracting
7. Periodic meeting to execute the plan
8. Periodic reports
9. Conclusion
10. Evaluation and follow-up
1. Protege identified :

In this step Coca-Cola Foods identifies the group of people who are eligible for the
mentoring programme. This can be done in a variety of ways such as looking at certain job
levels, departments, employee characteristics etc.

2. Identifying developmental needs :

In this step the developmental needs are determined and individual development plan is
prepared. And Coca-Cola Foods uses to develop their people is clearly a developmental tool
that involves leaders in the organization. This help considerably to strengthen the link
between development and business strategy. Coca-Cola Foods wants to make a formal
relationship structured around the developmental needs of the protege.

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3. Identify potential mentors :

This step produces a pool of individuals who can serve as mentors. Coca-Cola Foods identify
their mentor is higher up in the organization , someone who has experience and knowledge
about the culture and dynamics of the organization .Coca-Cola Foods selected the mentors
who have been successful, enjoy working for organization.

4. Mentor-protégé matching:

A mentor is selected for a specific protégé after considering the skills and knowledge needed
by the protégé and the ability of the mentor to provide practice or guidance in those area.

5. Orientation for mentors and protégés:

The mentor and protégé are from different departments so that there are no direct reporting
relationships involved. So before starting the mentoring relationship Coca-Cola Foods make
an orientation for both mentors and protégé.

6. Contracting:

A clear agreement is an essential foundation for a good mentoring relationship. The goal of
the Coca-Cola Foods mentoring relationship are to help protégés understand the organization
and their role in it better The emphasis on formal development and training programs in the
organizations is declining in favour of the greater interest in approaches to on-the-job
development worldwide. Consequently, coaching and mentoring are becoming increasingly
popular as the most important on-the-job learning techniques. But it will be naïve to take
coaching and mentoring as elixir to all the development related ailments. Rather, their
success depends upon the needs and the culture of the organizations.

7. Periodic meetings to execute the plan:

Most mentors and protégés meet for performance planning, coaching, and feedback sessions.
Coca-Cola Foods views coaching as an interaction that enhances performance. By providing
goals, techniques, opportunities to practice and feedback, the coach helps the person increase
competence and the probability of success. The agreement that the coaching is valuable is the
critical element.

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8. Periodic reports:

It is easy to evaluate the success of the mentoring programme if periodic status report
submitted by Coca-Cola Foods mentors and protégés. Good rapport is also important because
coaching and mentoring are powerful relationships that are open to abuse from both sides.
The participants need to agree clear rules and boundaries before the process begins and stick
to the same parameters throughout. Unless there is total trust, openness and commitment to
confidentiality, the scheme will quite simply be unsuccessful.

9. Conclusion:

A mentoring relationship concludes when the items delineated in the initial agreement have
been accomplished or when time or business or budget constraints prevent the relationships
from continuing. A coaching style of management should be the adoption of a non-
judgmental questioning method used to empower staff to reflect on their own actions and
behaviour and therefore internalise any necessary changes. It is the opposite of the command
and control paradigm which has been so prevalent in management. A part of every manager’s
job, in other words, should be this facilitating process that consists of questioning, rather than
instruction.

10. Evaluation and follow up:

After the relationship concludes Coca-Cola Foods ensures that the mentor is comfortable with
being a listener, with being asked questions, and with being a teller of advice and perspective.
Protégés, on the other hand need to be ready for a relationship in which they understand the
fact that they do not know a lot of things and hence need to learn. The protégés need to be
comfortable question asking questions and revealing concerns.

Coca-Cola Foods has tied mentor programme to business goals, it would seem that the
company approach is in line with both the scientific evidence and with recent idea of
achieving competitive advantage through people.

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Obejctive:3

What conditions are important for the success of mentoring programme?

Successful mentoring programmes generally need voluntary participation from both mentor
and mentee outside the normal hierarchy relationships, one-on-one relationships, and
integration with other developmental efforts. Commitment to programme by the boss of
mentee, the creation and communication of policies and procedures. The policies and
procedures should include a process for no-fault conclusions, a format for contracting, a
requirement of confidentiality, meeting and feedback guidelines, and a duration limit for
formal programme.

Some caveats

Some concerns are that there is a potential for mentee to play the mentor against the boss and
that the relationship can lead to breaches of confidentiality which may hurt the parties
involved. Mentees can be the focus of gossip and jealousy and may develop unrealistic
expectation about their potential; finally the mentee may not take responsibility for his/her
own development.

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Conclusion:

Coaching is a relationship activity designed to increase performance. Generally, coaching is


informal and occurs between the boss and employees. Mentoring is a more formal process,
based on a one-on-one relationship with someone distant in the organization. While a mentor
can use all of the coaching types, their purpose is broader in scope than that of a coach. Coca-
Cola foods believes that both processes are an important part of its human resource
development effort and that human resource development is a key to building competitive
advantage and to the creation of high performing organization. As stated previously, the
struggle at Coca-Cola foods has been maximize and/or optimize HRD’S contribution to
business success. Because there is a great deal of evidence regarding the important
contributions which mentors make to career success and because Coca-Cola has tied both
coaching and mentor programmes to business goal, It would seem that Coca-Cola food
approach is in line both the scientific evidence and with recent proponent of achieving
competitive advantage through people.

Recommendation:

Whatever matching approach decides to take, make sure that to meet the coach and mentor
before the process gets underway as good rapport between participants is essential. The
participate need to agree clear rules and boundaries before the process begins and stick to the
same parameters throughout. Unless there is a total trust, openness and commitment to
confidentiality, the scheme will quite simply be unsuccessful. Companies should ensure that
there is a proper feedback mechanism at the end of and coaching or mentoring undertaken.
This should enable and honest evaluation of its success and provide the relevant information
for any follow up action. Feedback should ideally be sought at regular intervals. This creates
a timely opportunity to identify be sought at regular intervals. This creates a timely
opportunity to identify potential trouble spots and rectify any mistake. There should be a
report at the end detailing result and recommendation, based on the analysis of resources
(including time and money) and participant’s feedback. It is important that usual constraints
of structured planning and control are applied to coaching/mentoring scheme. Some sort of
performance measurement and cost-benefit analysis is necessary. Company should produce
hard data weather qualitative or quantitative about the success or failure of the programme.

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There must be a clear objective form the outset against which progress can be measured. The
organization also aware of the following issue

 The incorrect matching of mentors/coaches and learners.


 The lack of top-down support.
 The resentment felt by those not involved in the scheme or the perception of
favouritism.
 The creation of false promotional expectation.
 The overdependence of the mentor are mentee.
 Gender issue
 Blurring of role boundaries and so on.

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