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CITY OF COLLEGE STATION

GIS Based Sustainable


Growth Model for South
College Station
By Pallavi Prakash Jha

http://workspall.blogspot.com

9/14/2010
Contents
Executive Summary ...................................................................................................... 1 

Introduction ................................................................................................................... 5 

Background ................................................................................................................... 6 

Water Conservation:........................................................................................................ 8 

Bikeways and Pedestrian Street enhancement: .............................................................. 9 

Strategic implementation of Alternate source of Energy:............................................... 10 

Statement of Purpose ................................................................................................. 10 

Goals and Objectives .................................................................................................. 10 

Methodology ................................................................................................................ 12 

Process with Model Description ................................................................................ 12 

Conclusion................................................................................................................... 46 

Bibliography ................................................................................................................ 47 

Note: The video presentation for this project can be viewed at


http://workspall.blogspot.com
Executive Summary

“In order to meet the needs of a growing community, the City of College Station must be
proactive in planning for adequate public facilities and services for its residents” (City of
College Station, Texas, 2009).The south College Station area has a population density
of 227 persons per square mile as per Census 2002 (city-data, 2010). With the
population growth and geographic expansion, the city has experienced tremendous
change over the past ten years, increasing the demand on all city services (City of
College Station, Texas, 2009). It is observed that the expansion has been occurring
towards the southern city limits, beyond William D. Fitch Parkway [SH 40] since 1990
(City of College Station, 2010). Although the southern area of College Station has yet
not reached a relatively high population density as compared to its other parts, it will
soon begin to bear the urban thrust with the upcoming developments. The city therefore
calls for an advanced planning for allowing a balanced growth assuring a clean, safe
and comfortable environment for the future.

This project has developed a growth model for south College Station area,
exploring the viability of incorporating sustainable development concepts in a real world
scenario. The methodology involves participatory approach for multi objective decision
making with GIS based analytical process. The project uses analytical hierarchy
process in map overlays and map algebra for locating community swimming facility;
uses vector analysis for incorporating street furniture on bike and pedestrian ways
and for finding target areas to implement sustainable energy practices. The project
recommends strategies for developing the upcoming south College Station area through
the defined goals and objectives attributing to the cause of sustainable development in
an incremental way, and then using them in a GIS based analysis for practical
implications. The goals and objectives in compliance with the comprehensive plan 2009
have made sustainable and cost effective recommendations.

The project’s first goal is to identify the most favorable site for the allocation of a
community swimming facility against many upcoming private pools, addressing the
issue of water conservation in the city of College Station. The site suitability analysis

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based on Analytical Hierarchy Process has been used for this goal using the criteria of
land use plans, walkibility to the existing neighborhoods, proximity to the new
development areas, access to the main roads and market land values in GIS based
modeling. The participatory approach in this analysis has helped achieve unbiased
results in the weighted overlay map outputs. The second goal aims for identifying sites
for installing street furniture that will also suffice the need of natural surveillance on
streets. The installation is planned in a prioritized manner by conducting GIS based
vector analysis for this goal. The installation will take place dispersively in phases for
benefiting a larger population in one go than pouring the initial resources in a
concentrated area. Recycled materials are recommended to be used for the
construction at the least possible cost and solar powered advertisement billboards have
also been recommended on some of the street furniture for recovering the cost in the
long run.The third goal is to find the areas most suitable for implementing Grid Tie Solar
system using market land value, land ownership pattern, income level and house condo
value as the criteria for evaluating the stratigic locations. The fourth goal is to set an
example for the future site planning that will be based on smart growth principles and
climate responsive planning.

The Images below illustrate the result from the goal 1,2 and 3. The details of the
analysis are further discussed in the paper with image results at every stage. A site plan
will be developed for detailing goal 4 using CAD, GIS and 3D visualization techniques in
the next task. The project for this goal would also grow itself into further detailing of
material study for better results.

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Figure 1: Result for the goal 1 showing possible sites for locating community swimming facility

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Figure 2: Street furniture model designed for goal 2

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Figure 3: Pebble Creek identified as the potential area for implementing the Grid Tie Solar system

Introduction

City of College Station considers sustainability an important issue to be addressed for


achieving planning goals and objectives. The City has been striving to incorporate this
concept in every sector of development by various means and approaches. The City
adopted the Bicycle, Pedestrian and Greenways Master Plan on January 28, 2010 as a
component of the City’s Comprehensive Plan for creating a bicycle and pedestrian
friendly community for healthy living. The layout strategically connects important
destinations such as parks, schools and businesses for the convenience of bikers and
pedestrians. The city is intensely working on developing action plans that target the
areas of water conservation, viability of alternate sources of energy, air quality,

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transportation, land use and green building (City Of College Station). This project
explicitly aims at looking into some of these areas for finding the scope of sustainable
development concept’s pragmatic application starting from micro level and developing
detailed strategies for achieving the defined goals in an incremental way. The actual
feasibility of the plan is tested on an upcoming area to the south of College Station
within the zip code of 77845 with defined goals and objectives by creating a working
model. Different criteria are identified for achieving the defined goals which form
objectives in GIS based analysis.

“To be effective in a broad range of decision making contexts, GIS procedures for multi
objective decision making need to be participatory in nature—where participatory
implies that the decision maker plays an active role in decision process and finds the
procedures used to have a simple intuitive understanding“ (Eastman, 1993). A similar
approach has been attempted in doing the site suitability analysis using a GIS based
participatory multi objective decision making technique for goal 1. Group participation
was commenced by considering planners’ votes for evaluating criteria in the analysis.
The analytical hierarchy process was used for deriving the weights for criteria
developed by Thomas L. Saaty for raster calculations via map overlays and map
algebra for taking decisions.

Background

The City of College Station is located in the state of Texas, having an estimated
population of 73,000 persons as per the Census 2002. It is observed that the growth of
College Station has been moving towards the southern city limits, beyond William D.
Fitch Parkway [SH 40] since 1990 (City of College Station, TX, 2010). The numerical
change in the population size within two years, from 2000-2002 has been 2717 with 4%
rate of change. The estimated population for the year 2009 is 93,149 persons with a
projection of 134,000 persons by the year 2030 (City of College Station). Looking at the
map below, it is very evident that the south of College Station has yet not reached a

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relatively high population density as compared to its other parts but will bear the urban
thrust very soon in the near future.

The population in the south of College Station within the zip code of 77845 is 29,171
persons as per Census 2000 with population density of 227 persons per square mile.
Pebble Creek and Castle gate are the most significant pieces of lands within this area
developed as single family residences. Both these areas offer exclusive living style with
home prices ranging from $197,000 to $979,000 in Pebble Creek. The Pebble Creek
subdivision residents enjoy a ten acre park complete with two playgrounds, soccer and
baseball fields, basketball courts, and jogging trails (city-data, 2010). The Oldham
Goodwin Group has proposed five prime commercial tracts in South College Station
located within the proposed Tower Point development, ranging in size from 2.3 acres to
17.7 acres.

Figure 4: Population Density

Sources: City of College Station, Brazos County Appraisal District, and 2000 U. S. Census.

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Water Conservation: The City of College Station is making enormous efforts for water
conservation. The city is vigorously working towards eliminating wasteful use of water
by educating people about careful uses via awareness programs, by changing
development ordinances and by implementing conservation rate system. Besides
developing mechanisms and strategies for water conservation by means of reusing
water, harvesting rain water and encouraging use of water saving devices, the city is
also focusing on identifying worthwhile investment strategies for minimizing wasteful
water consumption in day to day life (City of College Station). One of the steps taken for
enforcing this concept is by providing a high quality community swimming facility for
minimizing the further development of private pools that hog up resources and is a
wasteful water usage when accommodated at almost every household level. South of
College Station is the current area being studied for identifying a site for providing such
an amenity based on land suitability analysis using GIS based modeling. The existing
community pools at College Station are not included in this GIS based land suitability
analysis as they are not within walking distance fom the site being studied. There are all
together three public swimming pools in College Station, namely Thomas Pool at 1300
James Parkway, Adamson Pool at 1900 Anderson St and Hallaran Pool at 1600 Rock
Prarie Rd. Hallaran Pool marked as ‘C’ in map is 4.7 miles from the South of College
Station area with a fast moving traffic on TX-6 Frontage.

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Figure 5: Google Map

Bikeways and Pedestrian Street enhancement: The city of College Station adopted
the Bikeway and Pedestrian Master Plan in the year 2002, highlighting the necessasity
of bicycle facilities, multi-use paths and greenway trails for bicyclists and pedestrians.
On January 28, 2010 the Bicycle, Pedestrian and Greenway Master Plan got
incorporated as a componet of the College Station Comprehensive Plan (City of College
Station, TX, 2010). The city plans for the enhancement and beautification of these
pedestrian and bike ways by providing street furniture, dust bins and landscaping
elements. The allocation of street furniture on nodes and other appropriate locations
will not only serve as rest stations for adults and children after every six minutes walk,
but will also enhance the spatial quality of streets by adding to the aesthetics and by
inculcating natural survelliance on streets. Recycled materials will be used in making
these street furniture at the least possible cost for a cleaner and greener environment.
The Street furniture will be installed strategiclaly following the incremental development
approach by planning a priority based phase wise construction. The priority based
phases for street furniture installation would allow the city to use its funds for this

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development in a more managable way. Some street furniture may also have solar
powered advertisement billboards on them which can help the city to recover the cost in
future. The installation in every phase would start dispersively for benefiting a larger
population by encompassing a larger area in one go, rather than concentrating
resources for single area that would serve smaller population in one phase investment.

Strategic implementation of Alternate source of Energy: Average Adjusted Gross


Income in the year 2004 within the zip code 77845 in south College Station was
$64,880 which is high as compared to the average adjusted gross income of state
which is $47,880. The estimated median household income in the year 2008 was
$95,091 and that of the state was $50,043. The estimated median house/condo value in
the year 2008 was $203,788 where as that of the state was $126,799 (city-data, 2010).
The affluent demographics of south of College Station brings better opportunities for
sustainable development implications such as switching to a solar powered grid tie
system, where the profits on these alternate sources of energy still remains long term,
which does not allure the present oriented people with less than median level income.

Statement of Purpose

The main purpose of this project is to explore the workability of some sustainable
development concepts in planning by developing a detailed working model for south
College Station in a real world situation with the incremental growth approach, adhering
to the comprehensive plan of the city of College Station and using group participation in
GIS based modeling.

Goals and Objectives

Goal1: To find an appropriate site for allocating a community swimming facility as


a strategy for water conservation, to restrict further development of private pools.

Objective 1.1: Identify all eligible sites qualifying for allocation of a community
swimming facility development as per land use plan.

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Objective 1.2: Identify eligible sites based on walkability to the swimming facility from
existing neighborhoods

Objective 1.3: Identify eligible sites based on their proximity to future development

Objective 1.4: Identify sites based on accessibility to the main roads

Objective 1.5: Identify eligible sites based on affordability of land

Goal2: To find appropriate sites for locating recycled material street furniture for
the enhancement of bicycle and pedestrian ways encouraging natural
surveillance on streets

Objective 2.1: Identify sites at six minute walk interval (1500 ft) on existing and
proposed pedestrian ways

Objective 2.2: Identify sites on every intersections of streets

Goal 3: To find areas most suitable for implementing Grid Tie Solar system

Objective 3.1: Identify single family residences which can afford implementing Grid tie
Solar System based on market land value as most houses in this area are owner
occupied.

Objective 3.2: Ownership pattern

Objective 3.3: Income level

Objective 3.4: House Condo Value

Goal 4: Identifying basis for layout patterns of future development of residential


areas allocated by comprehensive land use plan, based on climate responsive
building, green practices and smart growth.

Objective 4.1: Street patterns and building orientation

Objective 4.2: Designing at unit level

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Methodology

Figure 6

Process with Model Description

Goal1: To find an appropriate site for allocating a community Swimming Facility


as a strategy for water conservation, to restrict further development of private
pools.

Process:

Five objectives have been identified for striking this goal. Each of the five objectives was
first dealt as an independent single objective multi criteria evaluation problem as

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explained in the abstract of Eastman. The results of these were used in finding the
solution with single output map algebra, eliminating the less significant areas. Group
participation technique was used in determining the relative importance of each land
parcel in the analysis of first objective and then the same method was used for the next
three objectives too. A hierarchy of criteria was made for the goal 1 which was
evaluated and rated by planners using voting. Weights were calculated for the
objectives 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3 using pair wise comparison in this analytical hierarchy
process. A nine point relative scale was used for the pair wise comparison and for
determining the relative importance of each land parcel in the first objective. Thus single
objective land allocation maps were created for all five objectives with the logic of
reclassified raster ranking which was finally overlaid to produce multiple objective land
allocation maps using Single Objective Map Algebra (SOMA).

Single objective multi criteria evaluation

Objective 1.1: Identify all eligible sites qualifying for the allocation of community
swimming facility development as per land use plan where Existing Land use plan and
Comprehensive Land use Plan form the criteria.

The existing land use plan and the comprehensive land use plan layers were used in
this model to produce a weighted overlay map where the existing land use plan was
given 45% weight and the comprehensive land use plan was given 55 % weight. The
weights were decided based on voting by six planners, on a scale of 100 and the
average value was considered for the raster calculation. Reclassified Raster maps were
created for both the polygon layers using the site suitability scores in producing the final
weighted overlay map. The site suitability scores on a scale of 9 were also decided by
voting in this analysis. Median value was considered as the final score for each land use
type. The tables1 and 2 illustrate the planner’s votes for the land suitability analysis for
objective 1.1 based on existing and comprehensive land use plan.

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Figure 7

Figure 8: Existing Land Use Plan

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Figure 9: Comprehensive Land Use Plan

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Votes for land suitability for the development of a community swimming facility as per
Existing Land Use Plan on a scale of 1, 3,5,7,9 where 1 = lowest suitability, 3 = low
suitability, 5 = moderate suitability, 7 = high suitability, 9 = highest suitability (0 indicates
no consideration)

Table 1

Planners Votes

V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V
Existing Land uses Venessa Lance Mathew Barbara Lindsy Pallavi Final

1 Undeveloped platted 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 9.00 9.00 3.00

Undeveloped
2 unplatted 9.00 0.00 3.00 1.00 7.00 7.00 7.00

Transportation/Utilities/
3 Communications 3.00 0.00 5.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

4 Storm water detension 3.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00

Single Family
5 Residential Detached 7.00 7.00 9.00 9.00 1.00 7.00 7.00

6 Semi Public Religious 3.00 3.00 5.00 5.00 1.00 3.00 3.00

7 SFRES 7.00 7.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00

Rural Large lot


residential more than 5
8 acres 5.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

9 Public Facilities 7.00 9.00 0.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00

10 Park Dedication 9.00 9.00 5.00 5.00 7.00 9.00 9.00

11 Park include cemetery 5.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

Mobile Manufactured
12 Home 3.00 5.00 5.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

13 Median 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00

14 Easement 0.00 0.00 5.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00

15 Common Space 3.00 5.00 9.00 9.00 3.00 5.00 5.00

Commercial Retail
16 (bank, hotels etc) 3.00 1.00 5.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

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17 Commercial Other 3.00 1.00 5.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

18 Commercial Office 3.00 1.00 3.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

Commercial Industrial
19 (wearhouse etc) 3.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

Single Family Res


detached and attached
20 like Town Houses 5.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 3.00 7.00 7.00

Figure 10: Reclassified raster map for existing land use plan

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Votes for land suitability for the development of Community Swimming Facility as per
Comprehensive Land Use Plan on a scale of 1, 3,5,7,9 where 1 = lowest suitability, 3 =
low suitability, 5 = moderate suitability, 7 = high suitability, 9 = highest suitability (0
indicates no consideration)

Table 2

Planners Votes

Comprehensive
Planning Land V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V
uses Venessa Lance Mathew Barbara Lindsy Pallavi Final

1 Business Park 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

2 Estate 5.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

3 General Commercial 5.00 0.00 5.00 5.00 1.00 5.00 5.00

4 General Suburban 9.00 5.00 9.00 9.00 5.00 9.00 9.00

5 Institutional/ Public 7.00 7.00 5.00 5.00 7.00 7.00 7.00

Natural Areas
6 Protected 5.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00

Natural Areas
7 Reserved 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 5.00 5.00

8 Restricted suburban 5.00 5.00 9.00 7.00 9.00 5.00 5.00

9 Rural 5.00 3.00 1.00 0.00 5.00 5.00 5.00

Suburban
10 Commercial 7.00 1.00 7.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

11 Urban 9.00 1.00 9.00 9.00 5.00 9.00 9.00

12 Utilities 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00

13 water 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00

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Figure 11: Reclassified raster map for comprehensive land use plan

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Weights on a scale of 100 for Comprehensive land Use Plan vs Existing land Use
Plan

Table 3

V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V
Criteria Venessa Lance Mathew Barbara Lindsy Pallavi Final

Comprehensive Plan Land


use 50.00 60.00 50.00 50.00 60.00 60.00 55.00

Existing Land Use 50.00 40.00 50.00 50.00 40.00 40.00 45.00

Figure 12: Weighted Overlay Map for Objective 1.1

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Pair wise Comparison for objectives 1.2, 1.3, and 1.4

Voting for Pair wise comparison

Table 4

Planners Votes

V1 V2 V3 V6 V
Venessa Lance Mathew Pallavi Final

Walkability / Access to main


road 9.00 7.00 5.00 7.00 7.00

Walkability /Proximity to ND 7.00 0.17 9.00 0.17 0.17

Access to main road/


Proximity to ND 9.00 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

Table 5

Walkability to
existing Access to main Proximity to new
neighborhood roads development

Walkability to existing
neighborhood 1.00 7.00 0.17

Access to main roads 0.14 1.00 3.00

Proximity to new
development 6.00 0.33 1.00

SUM 7.14 8.33 4.17

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Final Weights

Table 6

Walkability to Access to Proximity to


existing main new
neighborhood roads development

Walkability to existing
neighborhood 0.14 0.84 0.04 0.34

Access to main roads 0.02 0.12 0.72 0.29

Proximity to new
development 0.84 0.04 0.24 0.37

SUM 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

Objective 1.2: Identified eligible sites based on walkability to the swimming facility from
existing neighborhoods

Figure 13

Process:

The site was first clipped with the address points layer for locating area with maximum
household density and then the points were converted to thiessen polygon for
conducting buffer analysis. The Buffers were created around the selected areas having
maximum address points with distances of 2000 ft, 1500 ft, 700 ft, 300 ft and 100 ft.
These buffers were then converted to reclassified raster map with 2000 ft having score

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of 1; 1500 ft having score of 3; 700 ft having score of 5; 300 ft having score of 7 and 100
ft and less having score of 9.

Figure 14: Multiple ring buffers around address points

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Figure 15: Reclassified raster of multiple ring buffers for rating walkability

Objective 1.3: Identify eligible sites based on proximity to future development

Figure 16:

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Process:

Buffers with same distances were created around the new development areas, which
was then converted to reclassified raster.

Figure 17: New Development Areas

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Figure 18: Reclassified raster for rating proximity to new development areas

Objective 1.4: Identify Sites based on accessibility to the main roads

Figure 19

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Process:

The main streets were identified for the analysis and buffers were created along them
with the distances 2000ft, 1500ft, 700ft, 300ft, and 100ft. The buffers were then
converted to a reclassified raster with scores 1, 3,5,7,9 rating low to high for the above
mentioned distances.

Figure 20: Street Selection

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Figure 21: Reclassified Raster for rating access to streets

Objective 1.5: Identify eligible sites based on affordability of land value

Figure 22

Process:

Land parcels with market value were selected and were classified in five categories
starting from low to high land values. The existing single family land parcels with built

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forms were eliminated form this consideration. The five categories with low to high land
values were then ranked on a scale of 9 for incorporating the criteria in the raster
calculation.

Figure 23: Vector Classification

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Figure 24: Reclassified raster for rating market land value

Multi Objective Decision making based on Single Objective Map Algebra (SOMA)

Finally all of the above mentioned five objectives were overlaid to produce the final
output map based on Single output map algebra (SOMA). The output result indicates
the most favorable areas in magenta for locating the site for community swimming
facility based on the five objectives.

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Figure 25: Model for Goal 1

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Figure 26: Result of Single Output Map Algebra

Recommendation: A high quality community swimming facility would be built on one of


the sites identified as most suitable based on criteria selected as existing and
comprehensive land use plans, walkibility to existing neighborhoods, proximity to new
development, access to main roads and land values. The Community swimming facility
should make use of solar powered design guidelines. Taiwan recently finished
construction of a 50,000 seat solar powered stadium that generates 100% of its
electricity from photovoltaic technology designed by Toyo Ito (Inhabitat-Green Design,
2009).

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Figure 27

Source: Diane Pham, 05/20/09

Goal2: To find appropriate sites for locating recycled material Street furniture for
the enhancement of bicycle and pedestrian ways and encouraging natural
surveillance on streets

Process:

All the sites on pedestrian pathways at an interval of 6 min walk (1500 feet) were first
identified. These are the ideal number of street furniture that could possibly be made by
the end of last phase construction. However, the aim is to get reasonable figure for the
number of strategic points that can make phases of construction manageable with
limited funds as they come. Next, all the points on intersections were identified and
multiple rings buffers of 100ft, 350ft, 700ft, and 1300ft were created around them. These
buffer distances were then intersected with 1500 ft interval site points for achieving the
strategic locations for street furniture.

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Figure 28: Pedestrian Plan Status

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Objective 2.1: Identified sites at six minutes walk interval (1500 ft) on existing and
proposed pedestrian ways

Figure 29: Points with six minutes walk interval

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Objective 2.2: Identified sites on intersections of streets

Figure 30: Points on Intersections

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Figure 31: Multiple ring buffers on the street intersections

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Figure 32: Best 1500 feet interval points selected by intersection with multiple ring buffers

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Figure 33: Sites for installing street furniture in prioritized phases

The national university of Singapore has developed a technique for using recycled
aggregate/concrete into non structural constructions like building of street furniture. The
recycled aggregates obtained from the renovation or demolition of old buildings can be
used for a useful purpose thus creating a sustainable and green environment
(Designboom, 2008). Recommendations for implementing a similar concept has been
made for the pedestrian street enhancement program for creating a clean and green
environment in the neighborhoods of south College Station. Two types of model
furniture have been designed to set examples for this task. One uses recycled
aggregate/ concrete as designed by Cilicon Faytory in Singapore and the other uses the
metal rods and other useful parts from scrap buses.

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Figure 34: Recycled concrete furniture, designed by Cilicon faytory and produced by Compac Green
Singapore pte ltd.

Source: (Designboom, 2008)

Figure 35: Designed example furniture

Another recommendation for the bicycle and pedestrian street enhancement is


incorporating use of pervious concrete in construction of proposed bicycle and

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pedestrian ways. Pervious concrete was used for the Stratford Place project in
Washington for making surfaces like driveways, sidewalks and the main street that
works best for storm water management and eliminates cost of storm water catch
basins, detention vaults with lid, city/county future maintenance of roadway and storm
system etc. The Pervious concrete efficiently allows rainwater to strain through the
paved surface into the earth or a storage container (concretenetwork.com 2010).

Figure 36

Source: (Washington Aggregates & Concrete Association)

Goal 3: To find areas suitable for implementing use of Grid Tie Solar system

Process:

The income level in the area within zip code 77845 of south College Station is more
than the state average. The average Adjusted Gross Income in the year 2004 was
$64,880 and estimated median household income in the year 2008 was $95,090.
Estimated median house/condo value in the year 2008 was $203,788 (city-data, 2010).
Since the benefits of Grid tie solar system in terms of savings still remains long term,
the south College Station area would be a more apt area to target for implementing the
environment friendly solar system as more number of people can afford the starting
cost. The south College Station area having majority of owner occupied residences
would make this task even easier as HOA and Neighborhood partnership programs can

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play its role in organizing events for guiding people about assistance provided by the
city and private organizations. Market land value, ownership pattern, income level and
house condo value are the four identified objectives for achieving this goal. Land
parcels based on market land value when categorized from low to high indicate the
possible target areas for implementing the grid tie solar system based on objective 3.1.
The objectives 3.3 and 3.4 were not taken into consideration in the GIS based analysis
due to the lack of data but they were considered in the decision making process based
on their influence as seen in the demographics.

Objective 3.1: Identify single family residences which can afford implementing Grid tie
Solar System based on market land value as most houses in this area are owner
occupied.

Objective 3.2: Ownership pattern

Objective 3.3: Income level

Objective 3.4: House Condo Value

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Figure 37: Result for goal 3 by vector classification

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Figure 38: HOA Subdivision Site

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Figure 39: Land Ownership Pattern

Goal 4: Identifying basis for layout patterns of future development of residential


areas allocated by the comprehensive land use plan, based on climate responsive
building, green practices and smart growth.

Sub objective 4.1: Street patterns and building orientation

Sub objective 4.2: Designing at unit level

Note: This Goal will be further studied in greater details in the next research.

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Conclusion

The GIS based sustainable growth model for the south of College station is a strategy
based planning method which focuses on project viability in terms of cost, time and
resources. Issues of water conservation, environment, neighborhood safety and
aesthetics are tackled by using GIS based modeling with raster and vector calculations.
Multi Objective Decision making, using Single Output Map Algebra (SOMA) was used
with a participatory approach in evaluating scores by pair wise comparison in the
analytical hierarchy process that has brought less biased results in map outputs.

The GIS based south College Station growth model is just a start in the process of
making this area sustainable and environment friendly. Goals 3 and 4 would further aim
at exploring its scope and viability with detailed research and analysis on topics like
smart growth and green practices. A site plan will be developed attributing to the above
mentioned goals and objectives using CAD, GIS and 3D visualization techniques for
better understanding. The project will also grow itself into further detailing of material
study for better results.

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Bibliography

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City of College Station. (n.d.). Water Conservation. Retrieved August 03, 2010, from
Green College Station: http://www.cstx.gov/index.aspx?page=3189

City of College Station, Texas. (2009). Muncipal Services and community Facilities.
College Station.

City of College Station, TX. (2010). Bicycle, Pedestrian,and Greenways Master Plan.
College Station.

city-data. (2010). 77845 Zip Code Detailed Profile. Retrieved September 13, 2009, from
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