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JANUARY 11-17, 2012
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Young journalist
Area student has been chosen as
a young reporter. PAGE 4
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
Its not every day that Toll Gate
Grammar School physical educa-
tion teacher Linda Gardner has a
nationally known singing group
of 16 young men, including one of
her former students, serenade
her in front of the entire student
body.
But thats just what happened
Dec. 8, when the Dartmouth
Aires, the college a cappella
group that took second place on
NBCs all-vocal competition se-
ries The Sing-Off, visited Toll
Gate on their winter tour, bring-
ing a bit of Hollywood to
Hopewell Valley.
Claiming theyd just written a
special song a few minutes before
in the hallway, the acclaimed
group sang to Gardner to the de-
light of her students, who howled
with appreciation.
The song was one of a set that
thrilled Toll Gate students, who
were particularly excited to wel-
come back Aires member Robbie
Hoffman, who grew up in Pen-
nington and attended the school.
Im not the kind of person
who likes to be in the spotlight,
but they took care of me,
laughed Gardner, who has taught
at Toll Gate for 21 years and, by
no small coincidence, was Hoff-
mans teacher.
A few hours later, the Aires ap-
peared at Hopewell Elementary
School, where they had sung last
Mayor
reflects
on past
Mayor Paul Anzano had a
look back at 2011 in Hopewell
before looking forward and
being sworn into another term
as mayor of Hopewell Bor-
ough on Jan. 3.
First of all, I am grateful to
be re-elected, he said. I think
2011 was a good year for the
borough. We renegotiated a
sanitation contract, to great
savings for the town and
repaved Broad Street. We also
had the streetscape program.
It looks like we have a new
town.
There is not one vacant
storefront in town, Anzano
said, adding he is not the only
one who has noticed the posi-
tive difference in the town.
We have gotten some won-
derful comments from people
outside the community, he
said. They like what they are
seeing in town, and its been a
really positive atmosphere.
Anzano also had positive
feedback for the council mem-
bers.
Weve listened to each
other and tried to find com-
mon ground, he said. Weve
also listened to residents. We
dont pretend to know every-
thing going on in town, so we
rely on the publics input,
ALICIA BROOKS WALDMAN/Special to The Sun
The Dartmouth Aires, with Pennington native Robbie Hoffman in Santa hat, serenade Toll Gate Grammar physical education teacher Linda
Gardner at a performance at the school in December. Hoffman is a former Toll Gate student.
Toll Gate teacher serenaded
please see STUDENTS, page 2
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
please see MAYOR, page 3
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN JANUARY 11-17, 2012
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year before their appearances on
NBC.
In a live season finale of The
Sing-Off on Nov. 28, the group
came within inches of taking the
grand prize of $200,000 and a
recording contract, losing out to
the five-member, co-ed group Pen-
tatonix. Throughout the season,
the Aires wowed the Sing-Off
judges with their performances
ranging from pop tunes to coun-
try to rhythm and blues.
At Toll Gate, Hoffman, whose
parents, Penny and Rob, still live
in Pennington, recalled his time
at the school.
See that shark up there? he
asked the students, pointing to a
sea-life mural that hung in the
gym where they were perform-
ing. I painted that shark!
At Hopewell Elementary, the
Aires were greeted with a panel of
three judges, students imitat-
ing the Sing-Off judges, who com-
mented after each Aires number.
Hopewell Elementary fifth-
graders also serenaded the group
at the concerts end with a song
called Youre the Most Wonder-
ful Choir, Dartmouth Aires!
sung to the tune of Its the Most
Wonderful Time of the Year.
HES students presented the
Aires with a $1,000 check, culled
from piggy banks and snack
money, for the charity Saving
Strokes, which supports stroke
survivors.
The Aires did a fundraiser for
the group while competing in The
Sing-Off last summer.
Hoffman, who also went to
Timberlane Middle School and
the Lawrenceville School, and is
currently a junior at Dartmouth,
said his whirlwind exposure to
Hollywood was grueling. The
group, which auditioned and then
taped the competition over 10
weeks working 10- to 12-hour days
arranging and rehearsing their
numbers for the show, had almost
no downtime.
It wasnt until after the com-
petition was over and we could sit
back and watch the show that we
were able to think about the expe-
rience, he said. We learned so
much as a group about music,
performing and rehearsing, from
Students present
check for charity
STUDENTS
Continued from page 1
please see GROUP, page 7
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email
at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
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ideas and comments about what
their concerns are.
That cooperation he said,
has led to a very positive atmos-
phere in Hopewell Borough.
The mayor said he also was im-
pressed by how many residents
volunteered for borough boards
and commissions.
We actually had more volun-
teers than positions available, he
said. That shows that the public
is anxious to serve in the commu-
nity. There is a sense of pride, and
I am proud to say that all posi-
tions have been filled.
The mayor said he is looking
forward to the opening of the new
municipal building on Broad
Street this spring, noting, This is
the last swearing-in ceremony at
this building.
The new building, across from
Elm Street in the renovated Ma-
sonic Temple, will include about
3,000 square-feet on the main level
for municipal meetings and mu-
nicipal court and 3,000 square-
feet on the second level for munic-
ipal offices.
Still, Anzano says, theres a lot
to be done in the coming year.
We need to work on the budg-
et, on rebuilding the surplus and
on property taxes, the mayor
said.
Anzano was sworn in by
state Sen. Shirley Turner, and
Councilmen Schuyler Morehouse
and Robert Lewis were sworn
in by Assemblyman Reed Guscio-
ra.
Mayor: Plenty to do this year
JIM WRIGHT/The Sun
Mayor Paul Anzano is sworn in to a second four-year term as mayor
of Hopwell Borough as his family looks on Jan. 3 at the borough
council reorganization meeting.
MAYOR
Continued from page 1
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN JANUARY 11-17, 2012
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Established Over 70 Years
Timberlane eighth-grader Tay-
lor Galgano was recently chosen
to be a member of the Scholastic
News Kids Press Corp.
Scholastic, a childrens pub-
lishing and media company, has
chosen 59 students, ages 10 to 14,
from around the country to re-
port and write news for kids, by
kids to be published on their
website, scholastic.com, and in
other media.
The reporters will cover topics
ranging from the 2012
presidential election to entertain-
ment to other current events.
Kid reporters have interviewed
everyone from President Barack
Obama to director Steven
Spielberg to Jeff Kinney, author
of the Wimpy Kid book
series.
Taylor, who is in honors lan-
guage arts at Timberlane, applied
for the post during the summer
by filling out an application and
writing an article about her 9-
year-old brothers baseball team
winning the mid-Atlantic region-
al finals.
Taylor said she would get as-
signments from her editor at
Scholastic as well as coming up
with ideas of her own.
I really like writing and I like
current events, too, so I thought
this would be a really cool
thing to try, said Taylor, who
lives in Pennington and who
went to Stony Brook Elementary.
Im really excited to get
started.
Student reporter chosen
ALICIA BROOKS WALTMAN/Special to The Sun
Ruth Mamo, Timberlane Middle School seventh-grade honors language arts teacher, left, and Karen
McCarville, eighth-grade honors language arts teacher at TMS, right, are seen with student Taylor
Galgano.
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Borough council weighing
traffic options for bridge
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
The borough council is looking
at two options to make left turns
from Front Street on to the Green-
wood Avenue Bridge safer.
Front Street residents had
written a letter Nov. 29 with con-
cerns that the arc of the bridge
made it difficult to see traffic
when making a turn, and also
that the guardrail obscured the
view of oncoming traffic on the
bridge.
Borough engineer Dennis
ONeal said on Jan. 3 that he had
met with engineers from Mercer
County and the state Department
of Transportation about two
weeks ago and was presented
with the options of removing the
guiderail completely or removing
a 12.5-foot section to create better
sight lines at the Front Street in-
tersection.
The bridge was built to state
DOT standards, but is to be
turned over to Mercer County.
The county is more comfort-
able with a guardrail on the
bridge, ONeal said.
Councilman David Mackie
asked if a higher curb could be
installed on the bridge if the
guardrail was removed, since
there is a four-inch curb over the
bridge and a six-inch curb along
Greenwood Avenue.
Ive always questioned why
there was a guardrail on the
bridge to begin with, said Front
Street resident James Freeman,
one of the signers of the letter to
the council. A car could jump a
curb just about anywhere. Wheels
arent 13 inches anymore, they
are 20. I dont think raising the
curb from four inches to six
would make a whole lot of differ-
ence.
Councilman Sky Morehouse
suggested engineers look into
possible technology that allows a
flashing light to be triggered by
traffic coming over the bridge,
making it easier for residents to
determine whether their left turn
is safe.
I would encourage you to
think outside the box and try to
come up with some creative solu-
tions, Freeman said.
Mayor Paul Anzano said the
council would likely discuss the
options again at its next meeting.
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (856) 427-0933.
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN JANUARY 11-17, 2012
103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300
Princeton, NJ 08540
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300,
Princeton, NJ 08540. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
T
he state recently announced,
with great pride, that New Jer-
sey will be getting $38 million
in federal funding through the Race to
the Top program.
Now, getting $38 million is way bet-
ter than not getting $38 million. But,
still, this is a reminder that, a couple
of years ago, when there was $400 mil-
lion on the table, the state dropped the
ball.
You might recall that thats when
then-Education Commissioner Bret
Schundler messed up some paper-
work, or Gov. Christie messed up a
compromise application, depends
whos talking. The result was that
New Jersey fell a few points short of
getting the money. Back then, the com-
petition for Race to the Top funds was
fierce. Now, well, its kind of like get-
ting named Miss Congeniality.
But, with school budget time almost
upon us, money is money. And those
districts that signed up to be a part of
the program will split half of the
money, with the other half going to-
ward education reform, the governors
office said.
So, the good news is that, this time,
nobody messed anything up, and the
state is getting some money from the
federal government.
The bad news will be apparent in
the weeks ahead as school districts
begin to study their budgets. Since
school taxes make up the lions share
of your property tax bill, you should
pay attention to what they are doing
long before the April voting date ar-
rives.
There probably wont be the budget
chaos we saw a couple of years ago,
but there still will be struggles over
taxes and services. And it wont be
easy for any district to make the num-
bers match up.
Many districts invite the public into
the decision-making process. They
seek feedback and ideas. They actually
pay attention.
So, dont drop the ball. Get involved.
Its your money.
State still short $362 million
Recent school funding announcement brings back bad memories
It beats getting nothing
On one hand, its not $400 million. On
the other hand, getting $38 million
beats getting shut out again this year
due to messed up bureaucracy.
Posted on sun news
Police reports topped last weeks news
Full-sized pit bull attacks,
mauls 3-year-old in Plumsted
A full-sized pit bull attacked a 3-year-old
girl in Plumsted recently, and authorities
airlifted the child to a trauma center, the
Asbury Park Press reported.
She is being treated for severe bite
wounds to her back and head. Nothing has
been reported so far about the pit bull or its
owner. Township EMTs arrived at E. Mill-
stream Road and treated the girl, eventual-
ly deciding to airlift her from a landing
zone at New Egypt Speedway to Jersey
Shore University Medical Center in Nep-
tune.
She was conscious and alert the whole
time we were treating her, David Rogers
Jr., Chief of New Egypt EMS, told the
Press.
Barry Lank
Huge fight in parking lot
of chicken restaurant
This is a ridiculous year in Ewing al-
ready.
Police had to break up a huge fight in the
parking lot of a chicken restaurant early
New Years Day a melee that included two
men allegedly kicking and punching a
woman who was on the ground, The Times
of Trenton reported.
Township police were called to the
Prince Fried Chicken restaurant on North
Olden Avenue at 2:24 a.m. New Years Day
and found approximately 30 people fight-
ing and running from the front of the shop.
They also allegedly saw the men beating
up on the woman. Police ordered the men
to stop, but they reportedly continued until
officers deployed pepper spray. One man
men fled across Prospect Street into a
wooded area, but police caught the other
man Devon Bell, 28, of Trenton and
charged him with simple assault.
Barry Lank
Teen called cops, falsely said
he had hostages, demanded pot
A teenager in Ocean Township is ac-
cused of calling 911, falsely claiming he
had three hostages, and demanding mari-
juana, the Asbury Park Press reported.
The Tower Motel on Route 35 ended up
getting locked down for more than three
hours recently while police negotiated
with 19-year-old Tyler Seward, who lives at
the motel with his mother.
The incident began at about 9:49 p.m.
and went until nearly 2 a.m., a witness told
the Press. Occupants in nearby rooms were
evacuated to safety, as police established
communication with Seward and negotiat-
ed for the release of his nonexistent vic-
tims. Seward was eventually drawn out of
his room and taken to Monmouth Medical
Center in Long Branch for evaluation.
He was later charged with creating a
false public alarm and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Police said they found no
weapons or hostages.
Barry Lank
Dont miss a thing!
This is a sampling of what you can find
everyday on The Central Jersey Sun,
online at http://cj.sunne.ws.
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each other and from the other
groups.
In between taping the competi-
tion last summer and returning
to Los Angeles at the end of No-
vember to appear in the live fi-
nale and a Sing-Off Christmas
special, Hoffman managed to
squeeze in a semester abroad in
Barcelona, Spain.
Its been a crazy year, said
Hoffman, who planned the
Barcelona semester well before
The Sing-Off. We never really
expected to make it to the finale.
We didnt have high expectations;
it was a week- to-week thing. I re-
ally tried not to think about
Barcelona too much I just want-
ed to soak up the Sing-Off experi-
ence.
Now, being on national televi-
sion is just starting to sink in, he
says.
People talk so much about the
show to us on this tour, and think
were famous, he said.
The last stop, however, may be
the one that reinforced that new-
found notoriety the most: the
Aires sang at the White House
last month.
In the spring, Hoffman will
balance his other passion, a posi-
tion on Dartmouths varsity
lacrosse team, with his Aires
schedule. And while he doesnt
think hell pursue performing as
a career, hell always have The
Sing-Off.
This really is not an experi-
ence that Im ever going to for-
get, he noted.
Group sang at
White House
GROUP
Continued from page 2
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
WEDNESDAY
January 11
FOR ALL
MRCC Breakfast Workshop Series:
Franchising, Take Controlof Your
Future...Consider Other Options
At Capital Health, Hamilton Campus.
1445 WhiteHorse Mercerville Road,
Mercerville. Members free, future
members $35. (609) 689-9960 ext.
16.
MRCC Bordentown Chapter
Evening Networking: at HOB Tav-
ern. 146 Second Street, Bordentown.
Members $10, Future members $15.
(609) 689-9960 ext. 16.
Board of Adjustments Meeting:
7:30 p.m. at Municipal Building.
THURSDAY
January 12
FOR ALL
MRCC GRO Chapter Luncheon:
Speaker Marc Edenzon, CEO of Spe-
cial Olympics. Ruth Cris Steak
House, 2 Village Boulevard, Prince-
ton. $35 for members, $55 for
future members. 11:30 a.m. until 7
p.m.
MRCC YPC Business Card
Exchange: MRCC Confernce Room,
1A Quakerbridge Plaza Dr. Suite 2,
Mercerville. (609) 689-9960 ext.
24.
Hopewell Fire District No.1 Meet-
ing: 7 p.m. at Municipal Services
Building.
FRIDAY
January 13
FOR ALL
MRCC New Members Workshop: 8
a.m. MRCC Conference room, 1A
Quakerbridge Plaza Dr. Suite 2, Mer-
cerville Admission is free. (609)
689-9960 ext. 12.
TUESDAY
January 17
FOR ALL
Recreation Advisory Committee: 7
p.m. at Municipal Services Building.
Historic Preservation Commission
Meeting : 7:30 p.m. at Municipal
Services Building.
Environmental Commission Meet-
ing: 7:30 p.m. at Municipal Services
Building.
Yoga: 5 p.m. at the Hopewell Branch
Library. Call (609) 737-2610.
calendar PAGE 8 JANUARY 11-17, 2012
COMPILED BY ALAN BAUER
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The following items were taken
from reports on file with the
Hopewell Police Department:
Sometime between Dec. 21 and
Dec. 27, someone removed a 2-ton
hydraulic snowplow, valued at
$7,500, which was being stored in
a parking lot.
A 63-year-old Lawrenceville
man was charged with drunken
driving after a two-car crash on
Blackwell Road Dec. 27 at 3:42
p.m. Police said the man was driv-
ing a 2009 Subaru when he hit the
rear of a 2003 Mercedes driven by
a 22-year-old Skaneatesles, N.Y.,
woman, who was stopped waiting
to merge on to Pennington-
Lawrenceville Road.
Police said the man had an
odor of alcohol on his breath and
was placed under arrest after
performing field-sobriety tests.
He was processed at police head-
quarters where he also was
charged with reckless driving
and failure to exhibit an insur-
ance card.
He later was released to an ac-
quaintance and the case will be
heard in municipal court.
The woman suffered a minor
abrasion on her head, but refused
medical treatment, police said.
Sometime between Dec. 7 and
Dec. 24, someone removed a con-
crete lion statue, valued at $150,
from the base of a driveway along
Stony Brook Road.
A 21-year-old Pennington man
was charged with careless driv-
ing, failure to maintain a lane and
failure to wear a seatbelt after a
motor-vehicle crash on Marshalls
Corner Woodsville Road Dec. 28
at 5:30 p.m.
Police said they found a 1994
Toyota Camry off the road and
against a utility pole. The driver
complained of neck pain and was
taken to an area hospital by
Hopewell Valley Emergency Serv-
ices personnel.
Police said the 21-year-old pas-
senger was treated at the scene
for a minor cut on his hand.
Sometime between Dec. 29 and
Jan. 1, someone is alleged to have
removed a Trimmer Avenue
street sign, valued at $50, from its
post.
Sometime between Dec. 23 and
Dec. 26, someone threw two rocks
through a bathroom window of
the Hopewell Borough Train Sta-
tion building. Damage was esti-
mated at $100.
police
reports
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www.hopewellsun.com
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classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
JANUARY 11-17, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
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We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
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20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
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80per month Only
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25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
856-356-2775
BOARD YOUR
DOG IN A
LOVING HOME!
NOT A KENNEL!
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
FREE ESTIMATES
856-381-0249
NJ License #13VH06184500
CSI Group International
Absolutely all concrete problems solved
Repair and Restoration
Cracks are our specialty.
Residential and Commercial Services
Decorative Concrete
New Concrete
Seal Coating Power Washing
Mudjacking
Concrete Leveling
Stain Removal
Concrete Repair
Dog Boarding Autos
ATTENTION
JUNK CARS WANTED
Sell your junk car for $300 and up. We buy flood cars.
for more info call Mike at 609-820-8643
licensed salvage yard
EIectricaI Services
SDK SERVICES
Let us do your homework.
Gutter Cleaning
& Repairs
Soffitt Fascia
Rotten Wood
Door Installation
Painting
Kitchens
Fully Insured Licensed
609-200-4043
24 hour
Emergency
Service
Lic# NJ 13VH05972600
SNOW REMOVAL
Home Improvement
Roofing
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 2/8/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 2/8/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
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roofing
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Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 2/8/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 2/8/12.
FREE
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With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
DOG WALKING/PET CARE
Insured and Bonded
www.kittykissesandpuppypaws.com
732-616-2634
Dog WaIking
Handyman Services
Large or Small Repairs
Dependable, Family-based
Call Buddy Today! 609-468-0585
FREE ESTIMATES!
Fully Insured Lic. #13VH01208100
When you
mention this ad. 10% OFF
CHECK OUT THE SUN CLASSIFIEDS!
Firewood
Tutoring If youre reading your competitors ad?
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Special Classified offers available.
Dont delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933 x 512
INTO ACTION!
Has your high water alarm
gone off recently?
J WHALEN AND SON
PUMP SERVICE
Sewage and Sump Pumps
Installed and Repaired
Call 609-737-2722
Pump Services
Academic Success :
TUTORNG Certified K-12
Honors Graduate
Over 25 years exp.
Caring, ndividualized
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SAT Reading, Writing,
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to Pre-Calc., History Elem.
Phonics, Reading, Math;
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Excellent Ref.
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Pat Osander
"A Lady of Petigree"
House / Pet-Sitting
Phone: 609-896-0082
E-mail:garfdoggy@aol.com
FIREWOOD
Delivered Dumped
All 14-18 inches long
Split Aged Full Cord
SALE $195
Call: 908-359-3000