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com
JANUARY 18-24, 2012
The renovation
of the Titusville
House by Inside
Architecture
has earned the
Hopewell-based
firm a spot on
the forthcoming
Marvin Windows
website.
Photos
Special to The Sun
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Childrens theater
Come out and see Alice in
Wonderland Jr. next month. PAGE 8
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
The facelift of a Craftsman-
style home in Hopewell is get-
ting some national attention.
The project of local archi-
tectural firm Inside Architec-
ture was chosen recently to be
featured for the initial launch
of the Marvin Window Co.s
new Web initiative, which fo-
cuses on high-quality residen-
tial renovation projects and
that is intended to be a re-
source for both homeowners
and building professionals
alike.
That recognition, IA
founder Vince Piacente said,
only adds to the pleasure of
once again working with con-
tractor Dave Murphy, of Mur-
phy Contracting, of Penning-
ton, on the unique project.
We are very happy to have
this national recognition, the
owner of the 20-year-old com-
pany said. And very happy to
have teamed up with Dave
Murphy.
The featured home, he said,
was constructed in two parts
in 1911 and 1925 and exhibits
such architectural details as
exposed sculpted rafter tails,
roof brackets and a collection
of windows of all types and
sizes.
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
James Burd and Micheal
Markulec have switched jobs on
the township committee for 2012.
Markulec, who served as
deputy mayor in 2011, was elected
mayor by his fellow township
committee members Jan. 5, and
Burd, who served as mayor last
year, was elected deputy mayor.
Sworn into three-year terms on
the committee were the re-elected
Vanessa Sandom and newcomer
Alan Cannon.
Cannon is chief operations of-
ficer at Mary Thomas Inc., and
previously served as program
manager/analyst, as well as a
training manager, in the United
States Army. Id really like to
thank my family for all the sup-
port theyve given me, the new
mayor said at the reorganization
meeting. This is a thankless job.
There are lots of hours to it, and
sometimes the people closest to
you are the ones who get neglect-
ed.
The mayor also thanked the
township staff, and said, I hear
nothing but good things about
Home project gains attention
Craftsman-style
home is chosen
for website
please see WINDOWS, page 2
Year
begins
with
change
please see TOWNSHIP, page 4
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN JANUARY 18-24, 2012
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It was the finding of those win-
dows, one of which is a 6-foot-
wide spring-loaded double-hang
style, that brought the project to
the attention of Marvin Win-
dows.
The have a variety of window
styles, Piacente said. These are
not off-the-shelf type of windows.
Not everyone makes those. One
day, the rep called and said the
company wanted to use our proj-
ect on the new website.
The home, Piacente said, had a
kitchen with a servants entrance
and a back staircase off the
kitchen to the servants quarters.
It also had what he called
front-door confusion.
The house actually was fo-
cused on the river, he explained.
You had to go to the back of the
house to get to the door.
Our design challenge was to
create a porch and kitchen addi-
tion that would both integrate
and compliment the authentic
character of this special home,
said architect Carolyn Chaiko,
the chief project designer.
The house is beautiful and
unique, but it had been ill-cared
for a lot of years, Piacente said.
There were a lot of deferred
maintenance improvements that
had to be made, and the house
had to be painted in a period-ap-
propriate color.
The addition to the house cre-
ated a better flow from the living
area through the kitchen, Pia-
cente said.
The latest homeowners, Alli-
son and Ross MacLean, are the
first residents of the house in 95
years who were not part of the
family of the original builders.
They have taken such loving
care of this house; it was wonder-
ful to be able to work with them
on this effort, Piacente said. We
are very pleased to have a unique
project such as this one recog-
nized by an industry-leading win-
dow manufacture like Marvin.
The selection of this project is
certainly a reflection on the quali-
ty of that can be realized when
the architect and contractor work
closely together. I was very happy
that Dave was able to apply his ex-
ception skill and care to this en-
deavor.
The launch of the new feature
is scheduled for mid-January.
The website can be viewed at
marvin.com.
WINDOWS
Continued from page 1
Windows brought the project
to the attention of Marvin
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
Visit us online at
hopewellsun.com
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN JANUARY 18-24, 2012
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these employees from residents.
Im excited about this year. There
are lots of great things going on
in the Hopewell Valley, and we
have an opportunity to make this
a sustainable community here in
the valley, and I look forward to
working hard for that.
Burd, in his remarks, wel-
comed Cannon to the committee,
saying: His new and fresh out-
look on topics brought before the
committee will be beneficial to
the entire community. It has been
and will continue to be a privilege
to serve. It was truly an honor to
serve as mayor last year. During
that time, the township was con-
fronted with significant snow-
falls, phenomenal heat waves,
record-breaking rainfall, Hurri-
cane Irene and, of course, the in-
famous October snowstorm. All
of these were unpredicted and
impacted all of us.
Burd praised the volunteer fire
department, the police and public
works departments: that certain-
ly went the extra mile for the safe-
ty of all the members of our com-
munity.
He listed the opening of the
Capital Health Center, the forma-
tion of the deer management
committee and the Marshalls
Corner Pennytown Development
Task Force, which won a state-
planning award, as major accom-
plishments in 2011.
Then there was something
that received international
press, he said, pulling a small
rubber chicken from underneath
the dais, The Chicken Ordi-
nance.
The township, in April, passed
an ordinance requiring roosters
introduced into barnyards for
mating purposes be proven
healthy before interacting with
the hens, and limits the interac-
tion time to 10 days a year.
The idea of the ordinance was
to protect flocks against diseased
birds.
Chickens are Hopewells only
exception to a five-acre require-
ment for keeping livestock.
We can laugh a little about
this, he said, as the ripple of
laughter through the room died
down. But from conception to
approval, it took four years, and
that is an example of the energy
and dedication every one of the
members of our boards and com-
missions puts into every single
issue brought before them.
It is that kind of involvement
that makes Hopewell a communi-
ty to be proud of, he said.
Burd echoed Markulec in
thanking his family, especially
for waiting up for me until I re-
turned from township committee
meetings, even if they went a lit-
tle past 10:30, (the committee
rule for adjournment of meet-
ings.)
Township had number of
accomplishments in 2011
TOWNSHIP
Continued from page 1
Send us your Hopewell news
Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at 856-427-
0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
Visit us online at
hopewellsun.com
JANUARY 18-24, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
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The following items were re-
ported by Hopewell police:
A 48-year-old Hopewell woman
was charged with possession of
CDS, possession of drug para-
phernalia, CDS in a motor vehi-
cle, failure to inspect and driving
while suspended Jan. 3 after
being stopped at 1:56 p.m. on
Route 31 for having an expired in-
spection sticker.
She was charged at police head-
quarters and released, and the
case will be forwarded to the Mer-
cer County Prosecutors Office for
review.
Sometime between Dec. 30 and
Jan. 2, someone entered a North
Greenwood home through an un-
locked back door and took two
muzzle-loader rifles, a shotgun
and cash. The loss was estimated
at $1,100, police said.
A 57-year-old driver of a
Carnevale Disposal Co. garbage
truck dumped his load of garbage
in the parking lot of the Penning-
ton Shopping Center Jan. 3 at 6:14
a.m. after reportedly seeing
smoke and fire in the container of
the truck.
The pile of garbage was extin-
guished by the Pennington Fire
Department and personnel from
Hopewell Valley Emergency Serv-
ices.
The truck sustained minor
damage.
Sometime between 7 p.m. and
11:30 p.m. Jan. 4, someone forced
open the front door of a Wilfred
Avenue home and took a pewter
cup and a framed certificate, po-
lice said. The loss was estimated
at $50.
A 21-year-old Lambertville
man was charged with drunken
driving, reckless driving, failure
to maintain lane, leaving the
scene of an accident, failure to re-
port an accident, driving without
a license and receiving stolen
property, after a one-car accident
Jan. 1 at 9:48 a.m.
Police responded to Route 29
for the report of the accident, and
found a 1997 Nissan on its roof in
the middle of the road. Passing
motorists reported that the driver
had fled the scene on foot. A short
time later, the driver was spotted
by police along Route 29. After
performing a field-sobriety test,
he was placed under arrest and
transported to police headquar-
ters for processing.
Further investigation revealed
that the Nissan had been stolen
out of Philadelphia. The driver
was later released to an acquain-
tance, and the case will be for-
warded to the Mercer County
Prosecutors Office for review.
Sometime between Dec. 20 and
Jan. 2, someone cut down a 25-foot
tall Blue Spruce tree on a proper-
ty along Pennington Titusville
Road. The top portion of the tree,
approximately 6 feet, was then
taken from the property. It ap-
pears that an axe was used to cut
the tree down. The loss was esti-
mated at $100.
Sometime between Dec. 23 and
Jan. 2, someone damaged the
spindles on the gazebo located
near the Hopewell Elementary
School playground. A thermome-
ter in the garden was also broken.
An estimate of the damage was
unavailable.
The Route 518 Bridge between
Route 31 and Stony Brook Road
has been repaired and was re-
opened on Friday, Jan. 6, at ap-
proximately 4:30 p.m.
POLICE REPORTS
Send us your
Hopewell news
Drop us an email at
news@hopewellsun.com. Fax
us at (856) 427-0934. Call the
editor at (609) 751-0245.
in our opinion
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN JANUARY 18-24, 2012
103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300
Princeton, NJ 08540
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300,
Princeton, NJ 08540. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
H
ad things not changed, right
now presidential hopefuls
would be gearing up for New
Jerseys Feb. 7 primary election. They
would have, in theory, been canvassing
the state, spending big dollars and oth-
erwise putting the state in the spot-
light similar to what happens in
Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina
and Florida early in the primary
process.
But, last year, the state moved the
primary date back to June. June 5, to
be exact.
Now, you might be wondering
why the state would do such a thing.
Wouldnt it be grand to have CNN and
Fox News trucks and reporters all
over the place while the hopefuls
shook hands at diners and attempted
to navigate traffic circles?
Not really. Not if the costs out-
weighed the benefits.
And, in this case, the costs were too
much to handle.
The first problem was that the polit-
ical parties were not happy when a
bunch of states decided that earlier
was better when it came to holding
primaries and caucuses. The parties
kind of like the way things are now,
with Iowa first, New Hampshire sec-
ond, etc. So, when New Jersey and
other states started to make noise
about moving their dates, the parties
took exception and threatened to
whack the number of delegates and do
other mean things.
Second, the February election
would be a second primary election
for the state, as it still would have had
one in June. Elections cost money. Mil-
lions of dollars. Why not save that
money and just hold one election, in
June?
Who knows? Maybe the late election
one day will prove to be a benefit.
Maybe the race wont be over after
Super Tuesday. Maybe well get all
of the attention and campaign dollars.
Or not. Either way, lets give the
state pols some credit for doing the
wise thing this time around.
Sometimes later is better
Moving the presidential primary back to June made sense (and cents)
See you in June
The states decision to move our pres-
idential primary to June was a practi-
cal one. The parties arent mad and
taxpayers will end up saving millions
of dollars.
Posted on sun news
Oceans 11, downloads, jumper, tire fire
Group calling itself Oceans 11
charged with 15 burglaries
For some reason, a group of accused
burglars allegedly called themselves the
Oceans Eleven Gang, The Times of Tren-
ton reported even though there were only
five of them.
Also, their alleged crimes didnt show a
lot of class. They just allegedly committed
a lot of them.
Police in Hamilton charged the group
with more than 15 residential burglaries.
Accused of burglary and theft are
Christopher S. Tew, 21, Terrance M. Clark,
18, John M. Dori, 20, William J. Barrett, 21,
and Nicole Salvatore, 20 all of Hamilton.
Barry Lank
Queen of illegal downloads
goes to prison
A North Brunswick woman who helped
people illegally download films and TV
shows has been sentenced to almost 22
months in prison, the Associated Press re-
ported.
Hana Beshara, 30, who founded Nin-
jaVideo, was sentenced recently in federal
court in Alexandria, Va.
Beshara was known online among Inter-
net piracy groups as Queen Phara, and
her site enabled nearly 1 million down-
loads a week of films and TV shows, in vio-
lation of copyright laws.
Prosecutors said Beshara made more
than $200,000 from the web site.
With NinjaVideo down, other sites are
already replacing it, blogger NateBlack
noted on Lionsdenu.com.
Barry Lank
Man allegedly jumps into river
to avoid paying bar tab
A man in New Hope, Pa., jumped into
the Delaware River recently rather than
pay a $25 bar tab, witnesses told The Times
of Trenton.
The Lambertville Rescue Squad joined
the New Hope Eagle Volunteer Fire Com-
pany cruising the river until firefighters
found the man on shore, not far from
where hed jumped. The customer arrived
at the Sandbar on Main Street around 6:30
p.m., drank five beers and would not pay, a
bar server told the paper.
Barry Lank
Dont miss a thing!
This is a sampling of what you can find
everyday on The Central Jersey Sun,
online at http://cj.sunne.ws.
A Philadelphia resident drove past a pa-
trol officer, hit a concrete divider, spun
her car 360 degrees and stopped in the
middle lane of the highway, police said.
Local author and singer/song-
writer Camden Joy will perform
with his guitar at Penningtons
Veridian Gallery, at 43 S Main St.,
on Jan 19.
The show begins at 8 p.m., and
is free of charge.
Many of the songs Joy will
play are from the Presidential
Coins series, his musical re-
sponse to the recent demise of the
$1 presidential coin.
In the mid-1990s, Camden
Joy (the stage/pen name of Pen-
nington resident Tom Adelman)
attained an unusual notoriety for
his NYC postering projects and
street manifestos. The publica-
tion of these posters within a se-
ries of small tracts garnered
praise in Spin magazine and a
great many other publications.
NPRs Ira Glass lauded him as
one of this countrys most origi-
nal music writers.
He has authored six fiction
books, and his prose style earned
comparisons to Frank OHara,
Lester Bangs and Hunter S.
Thompson.
JANUARY 18-24, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
Shear Madness
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Preschool classes for children ages 2-5.
We nurture the social, developmental, emotional and spiritual lives of children.
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Camden Joy performs
at Veridian gallery
Pennington Presbyterian
Church at 13 South Main St., Pen-
nington, is thrilled to announce
that they are hosting Afraid!
the Gospel of Mark, a one-man
dramatic play written and per-
formed by Frank Runyeon, for-
merly of Hopewell.
Afraid! will be held on Sun-
day, Jan. 29, at the 10:15 a.m. serv-
ice. It will be the majority of the
service that morning.
Runyeon has gained national
acclaim in recent years as a trans-
lator and performer of biblical
texts. He has performed the
gospel for hundreds of thousands
of people in almost every state in
America.
He is probably still best known,
however, from his many years on
television. He starred opposite
Meg Ryan on As the World Turns,
as Father Michael Donnelly on
the Emmy award-winning Santa
Barbara and as tycoon Simon
Romero on General Hospital,
opposite Emma Samms. He has
also guest-starred in recurring
roles on L.A. Law as talk show
host Brooks Tapman, on Falcon
Crest as chess genius Jovan
Dmytryk, on Melrose Place as
Father Tom and on All My Chil-
dren as Forrest Williams.
He also starred in the feature
film Dark Streets.
For more details about Frank
Runyeon, visit
www.frankrunyeon.com.
For more details about this spe-
cific event, call the church at
(609)737-1221, or check out the
website at
pennpres.org/frank-runyeon.
Afraid! the Gospel of Mark being performed
Jan. 29 at Pennington Presbyterian
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The Hopewell Valley Chil-
drens Theatre will be presenting
Disneys Alice in Wonderland
Jr. Feb. 4 at 7 p.m. and Feb 5 at 1
p.m. at the Performing Arts Cen-
ter at Hopewell Valley Central
High School, 259 Pennington-Ti-
tusville Road.
The cast features Caroline Her-
bert as Alice, Hudson Orfe as the
Caterpillar, Mathew Sing as the
White Rabbit, Gillian Lee as
Tweedle Dum, Sasha Gardee as
Tweedle Dee, Zachary Benedetti
as the Mad Hatter, Jillian Mannix
as the March Hare, Chloe Lam-
ond as the Queen of Hearts, Tris-
tan Lee as the King of Hearts,
Annabelle Stocks as Little Alice
and Zoe Dec as Big Alice.
HVCTs production of Alice
brings together 41 area students
from a variety of towns and ele-
mentary schools including, Stony
Brook, Toll Gate, Bear Tavern,
Hopewell Elementary, Lore,
Princeton Charter School, An-
theil Elementary, Village Elemen-
tary and West Amwell.
The HVCT creative staff be-
hind the production of Alice in-
cludes producer/director Cathy
Sing, music directors Bernadette
Furlong and Vicki Krampf, chore-
ographer Jessica Furlong, cos-
tume designers Carol Sanford
and Sheri Crerand, administra-
tive director/artistic consultant
Moira Sandford and technical/set
directors Billy Brown and Chris-
tian Lambert.
Supporting the cast and staff
are a host of middle- and high-
school interns, who volunteer
their time and energy mentoring
the elementary-school-age cast.
The intern staff includes Katina
Angelakis, Sarah Ehrenberg,
Brian Sandford, Alyssa Sanford,
Lindsay Sanford, Emily Sing, Jil-
lian Sing and Hannah Solomon.
Tickets are $12 for adults, $7 for
students and senior citizens, and
are on sale now at
www.Showtix4u.com. For group
sales of 20 or more, discounts are
available ... please email
hvctstaff@gmail.comfor details.
For information about HVCT
and upcoming events, such as en-
rollment for 2012 summer camp
sessions for elementary through
high school students, visit,
www.hvct.org or call (609) 649-
3042.
WEDNESDAY
January 18
FOR ALL
Senior Advisory Board Meeting: 2
p.m. at HV Senior Center, 395 Read-
ing Street Pennington.
Edit Your Holiday Photographs: 7
p.m. at the Hopewell Branch Library.
Call (609) 737-2610 for more infor-
mation.
THURSDAY
January 19
FOR ALL
State of the County Address:
MRCC Power Luncheon at Stone
Terrace, 2275 Kuser Road, Hamilton.
Member $5, Future Member $65.
Call (609) 689-9960 ext. 14 for
more information.
Open Space Advisory Committee
Meeting: 7:30 p.m. at Municipal
Building.
Hopewell Fire District No. 1 Meet-
ing: 7 p.m. at Municipal Services
Building.
MONDAY
January 23
FOR ALL
Township Committee Meeting: 7
p.m. at Municipal Building.
Book Sale Preview: 6-8 p.m. at the
Hopewell Branch Library.
TUESDAY
January 24
FOR ALL
New Jersey Writers Society Sup-
port Group: 6 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch Library.
Book Sale: 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. at
the Hopewell Branch Library.
calendar PAGE 8 JANUARY 18-24, 2012
COMPILED BY ALAN BAUER
Want to be listed?
To have your meeting listed,
information must be
received two weeks prior to
the date of the event.
The Best BageIs in New Jersey
Enjoy your Holidays and Guests!
Let Deli on a Bagel Caf do the work
Deli on A Bagel Cafe
Shoppes at Straube Center
21 Route 31 Pennington, NJ
609-737-5730
Must present coupon at time of purchase. Expires 1/31/12.
Offers cannot be combined with any other offers.
Specializing in sandwich and bagel platters with all the
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Warm wishes to you and your family from ours!
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WINTER
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Special to The Sun
Performing in the Hopewell Valley Childrens Theatre production of Alice In Wonderland Jr. are, from left,
Zachary Benedetti as the Mad Hatter, Jillian Mannix as the March Hare and Mathew Sing as the White
Rabbit.
Hopewell Valley Childrens Theatre putting
on Alice in Wonderland Jr. twice next month
JANUARY 18-24, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
Mortgage rates are effective March 16, 2011. This rate is on a thirty year fixed mortgage. Offer is subject to credit approval and
may change without notice. *Minimum loan amount is $200,000, maximum LTV 80%.
4.750
%
30 YEAR FIXED
MORTGAGE
FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS
can purchase a new home with as little
as 3.5% down payment.
American Wide Loans has some of the
best Mortgage Rates and nationwide
home loans for all your mortgage needs.
We have a no points and no fees option
available for refinancing and purchasing
your home.
For more information about todays
lowest rates, call (888) 765-9960 or apply
online at http://elauw.it/amwideloans.
Bttgt//eIuw.It/stuyvesmtBumt
Located a short distance from Albany, NY, Stuyvesant Outdoor Adventures offers custom tailored
packages and accommodations for serious and casual hunters alike. All of our packages include a
full hunting excursion, licensed guide, field dressing, as well as all meals and accommodations at
our newly remodeled lodge - Stuyvesant Manor; the former estate of Hollywood Icon Sidney Poitier -
which is also licensed as a bed and breakfast.
Whether you're looking for a short getaway, a corporate retreat, a camping weekend or even a seminar
with guest speakers and instructors, Stuyvesant Outdoor Adventures is a perfect spot.
Foz InIoznatIon, to nake a zesezvatIon oz to zeach
ouz tzIp-pIannIng concIezge, caII
(888} 690-0041
FALL AND 8PRINO
Turkey, WhitetaiI Deer
(archery, rifIe, muzzIeIoader),
Pheaaant (fieId and tower),
Coyote, Rabbit and WaterfowI
FBOm WHITBTAIL DBBB AND WILD T0BHBY TO
PHBASANTS, WATBBFOWL AND mOBB.
Honey Brook Organic
Farm to be featured on
Food Network
In September, Honey Brook Or-
ganic Farm in Pennington hosted
celebrity chef Michael Symon,
who filmed a segment of a Food
Network special intended to high-
light the amount of waste in our
food system. The show, The Big
Waste, was to air on Jan.14 and
Jan. 15.
Parks and Recreation
hosting trip to flower
show March 8
The Hopewell Township Parks
and Recreation Department is
sponsoring a trip to the Philadel-
phia Flower Show on Thursday,
March 8 for all Hopewell Valley
residents and their guests.
Be prepared to be whisked
away on the tranquil winds of the
Hawaiian Islands and celebrate
this years theme, Hawaii Is-
lands of Aloha!
Native and tropical plants will
rise in a living wall amid cas-
cades of orchids and thundering
waterfalls. Hula dancers, torch-
twirlers and 3-D images of crash-
ing waves and rumbling volca-
noes will honor Pele, Goddess of
Fire.
As always, the flower show
marketplace will offer quality
tools, sculptures, plants, artwork,
orchids and cut flowers in more
than 150 vendor booths.
Spend a leisurely afternoon
amid the beautiful floral
landscapes and the allure of
Hawaii.
The trip departs from Inde-
pendence Park at 9 a.m. and re-
turns at 4 p.m. The cost of $49 per
person ($45 for Hopewell Twp. res-
idents) and includes admission
and transportation with lunch on
your own.
To register, call the recreation
department at 737-3753, or visit
the office in-person at the
Hopewell Township Municipal
Building.
BRIEFS
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
JANUARY 18-24, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
$
80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
856-356-2775
BOARD YOUR
DOG IN A
LOVING HOME!
NOT A KENNEL!
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
FREE ESTIMATES
856-381-0249
NJ License #13VH06184500
CSI Group International
Absolutely all concrete problems solved
Repair and Restoration
Cracks are our specialty.
Residential and Commercial Services
Decorative Concrete
New Concrete
Seal Coating Power Washing
Mudjacking
Concrete Leveling
Stain Removal
Concrete Repair
Dog Boarding Autos
ATTENTION
JUNK CARS WANTED
Sell your junk car for $300 and up. We buy flood cars.
for more info call Mike at 609-820-8643
licensed salvage yard
EIectricaI Services
SDK SERVICES
Let us do your homework.
Gutter Cleaning
& Repairs
Soffitt Fascia
Rotten Wood
Door Installation
Painting
Kitchens
Fully Insured Licensed
609-200-4043
24 hour
Emergency
Service
Lic# NJ 13VH05972600
SNOW REMOVAL
Home Improvement
Roofing
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 2/8/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 2/8/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 2/8/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 2/8/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
DOG WALKING/PET CARE
Insured and Bonded
www.kittykissesandpuppypaws.com
732-616-2634
Dog WaIking
Handyman Services
Large or Small Repairs
Dependable, Family-based
Call Buddy Today! 609-468-0585
FREE ESTIMATES!
Fully Insured Lic. #13VH01208100
When you
mention this ad. 10% OFF
CHECK OUT THE SUN CLASSIFIEDS!
Firewood
LET
THE
SUNS
WORK
FOR
YOU!
Call
(856)
427-0933
for
Advertising
info.
Tutoring
Has your high water alarm
gone off recently?
J WHALEN & SON
PUMP SERVICE
Sewage and Sump Pumps
Installed and Repaired
Call 609-737-2722
Pump Services
Academic Success :
TUTORNG Certified K-12
Honors Graduate
Over 25 years exp.
Caring, ndividualized
instruction
SAT Reading, Writing,
Math, Subject Tests CT, All
Standardized Tests H.S.
Eng, Lit. and Writing; Math
to Pre-Calc., History Elem.
Phonics, Reading, Math;
Study Skills; E.S.L.
Excellent Ref.
609-924-2610
Pat Osander
"A Lady of Petigree"
House / Pet-Sitting
Phone: 609-896-0082
E-mail:garfdoggy@aol.com
FIREWOOD
Delivered Dumped
All 14-18 inches long
Split Aged Full Cord
SALE $195
Call: 908-359-3000
2012 VCLVC S601S
Lease for
36 Month
$ *
Adaptive Cruise Control
Pedestrian detection with Full Auto Brake
Collision Warning with Full Auto Brake
Blind Spot Information System
Rear Park Assist Camera
Safer interior materials
Fuel-saving design
85% recyclable
Cleaner exhaust
Minimum drag
CUk NLIGn8CknCCD VCLVC DLALLkS
Closer Than You Think!
*Acquisition fee $695. No security deposit required. Available to qualified customers. Stock #212449. All prices
with tax, tags, registration and documentation fees additional. 36 month, 10,000 mile lease. Expires 1/31/12.
**MSRP $32,025. Total due at signing $3,293. Visit retailer for details.
Volvo builds the cars, we build relationships.
VCLVC CI kINCL1CN
2931 U.S. 1 South
Lawrencev|||e, NI 08648
(609) 882-0600
8kIDGLWA1Lk VCLVC
1028 U.S. 22 Last
Somerv|||e, NI
(908) S26-7700
VCLVC CI LDISCN
842 U.S. 1 North
Ld|son, NI
(732) 248-0S00
VCLVCCCUN1k.CCM