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The Atlantic
103 min read
Politics

Trump's Interests vs. America's, New Delhi Edition

President Donald Trump’s international real-estate empire continues to grow. According to The Washington Post, two new Trump-branded buildings—one residential development and one office tower—will soon be going up in Gurgaon, a suburb of New Delhi, India, “known for rapacious development and poor planning.” As with many of the company’s other international projects, the deals create new conflicts of interest as they bring the Trump Organization into contact with more investors, partners, and governments that may seek to influence the president’s decisions. The nature of the real-estate busines
Nautilus
18 min read
Self-Improvement

Why Your Brain Hates Other People: And how to make it think differently.

As a kid, I saw the 1968 version of Planet of the Apes. As a future primatologist, I was mesmerized. Years later I discovered an anecdote about its filming: At lunchtime, the people playing chimps and those playing gorillas ate in separate groups. It’s been said, “There are two kinds of people in the world: those who divide the world into two kinds of people and those who don’t.” In reality, there’s lots more of the former. And it can be vastly consequential when people are divided into Us and Them, ingroup and outgroup, “the people” (i.e., our kind) and the Others. The core of Us/Them-ing is
New York Magazine
29 min read
Politics

Citizen Clinton

When I walk into the Chappaqua dining room in which Hillary Clinton is spending her days working on her new book, I am greeted by a vision from the past. Wearing no makeup and giant Coke-bottle glasses, dressed in a gray mock-turtleneck and black zip sweatshirt, Hillary looks less Clinton and more Rodham than I have ever seen her outside of college photographs. It’s the glasses, probably, that work to make her face look rounder, or maybe just the bareness of her skin. She looks not like the woman who’s familiar from television, from newspapers, from America of the past 25 years, but like the 6
  • audiobook
Alex P., Scribd Editor
From the Editors

Nuanced perspective…

William D. Cohan uniquely sees both sides of the stock market: As a former investment banker and respected financial journalist who has frequently criticized the excesses of Wall Street, he nonetheless believes in the necessity of the institutions for a well-functioning society. It’s a fascinating and nuanced read that does a great job of countering the current waves of contempt without implying that the finance sector should have a free pass.